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Yoga Sutras 3.19-3.20: Ideas from the mind of another

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  • Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati
    Yoga Sutras 3.19-3.20 IDEAS FROM THE MIND OF ANOTHER http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-31737.htm#3.19 By samyama on the notions or presented ideas comes
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 6, 2008
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      Yoga Sutras 3.19-3.20
      IDEAS FROM THE MIND OF ANOTHER
      http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-31737.htm#3.19

      By samyama on the notions or presented ideas comes knowledge of
      another's mind. But the underlying support of that knowledge remains
      unperceived or out of reach.
      [Samyama has been described in previous sutras as the three-fold
      process of dharana, dhyana, and samadhi, which is concentration,
      meditation, and deep absorption]

      ************************
      YOGA SUTRA 3.19
      ************************

      By samyama on the notions or presented ideas comes knowledge of
      another's mind.
      (pratyayasya para chitta jnana)

      pratyayasya = notions, presented ideas, of the content of the mind,
      conceptions
      para = other
      chitta = of the mental images, consciousness, of the consciousness of
      the mind-field
      jnana = knowledge

      IDEAS ARE PRESENTED ONTO OUR OWN MIND FIELDS:

      We, as inner observer, are actually watching the inner screen of our
      own mind field. Whether we are talking about the thought process of
      another person, or the data brought in through the eyes, ears, or
      other senses, that information is imprinted on our own field of mind,
      somewhat like a movie is projected on a screen. Then, we, as the
      inner observer, experience the presentation on that screen. Here's a
      brief outline of this process:

      1) Samskaras in the other mind: The deep impressions in the other
      person's mind awaken and come forward into active mental process.

      2) Presented ideas or notions: Having awakened, the mental process
      from these impressions is now active in the field of mind of the
      other person.

      3) Impressions coming to our mind: That mental process now comes to
      our mind, as viewer, with which we practice samyama (concentration,
      meditation, samadhi, 3.4-3.6)

      OBSERVING WHAT'S ON THE SCREED:

      If we observe the inner screen in visual terms, we come to know the
      nature of the form, shape, and color of the objects on the screen,
      and from that we can intuit the nature of the actual object itself.
      The same is true for hearing. The important concept is that there is
      an intermediary, in that the data is imported, it is presented on the
      screen, and then we experience. That mental screen is the key
      concept.

      INTUITING THE THOUGHT IMPRESSIONS:

      If you observe the mental information on the screen, you not only get
      information about the data on the screen, but also intuit the nature
      of the source of that mental data, which is the mind of the other
      person. In this way, you come to know the general state of the
      conscious mind of the other person. However, you do not gain insight
      about the subliminal, deeper impressions or samskaras that were the
      driving force behind those conscious thoughts (as explained in the
      next sutra, 3.20).

      TRAINING OUR MIND; NOT MANIPULATING OTHERS:

      The point here is not to manipulate other people through some sort of
      mind control. The value is in seeing the way that your own mind is
      affected by the presented thoughts from others, along with the
      insights about the other mind from which they are being projected.
      From that we can deal with our own mental conditioning in response to
      that which might otherwise control our own actions, speech, and
      thoughts.

      WE CAN THEN GAIN FREEDOM FROM OUR CONDITIONING:

      If we can do that observation, we can gain insight about, and freedom
      from our own mental conditioning that is normally unconscious. This
      is yet one more aspect of the uncoloring (aklishta) of our own deep
      impressions, which has been mentioned throughout the Yoga Sutras
      (1.5, 2.1-2.9). It is our reaction that is the mental process to be
      purified. Recall that four attitudes were suggested in sutra 1.33 in
      relation to other people. These were based on the conditioning of our
      own mind, not changing the other people. Here, in Chapter 3 a subtler
      aspect of our mental processing is being described. It leads to
      increasing freedom from attachments and aversions (1.12-1.16).

      ATTAINMENTS AND OBSTACLES:

      As with the other subtle experiences this is seen to be both an
      attainment and an obstacle, and is set aside (3.38) with non-
      attachment (1.15).

      ************************
      YOGA SUTRA 3.20
      ************************

      3.20 But the underlying support of that knowledge (of the other
      persons mind, in 3.19) remains unperceived or out of reach.
      (na cha tat salambana tasya avisayin bhutatvat)
      [Note: This sutra is not included in all renditions]

      na = not
      cha = but
      tat = that
      salambana = with support
      tasya = its
      avisayin = unperceived, not within reach, not being the subject of,
      absent from
      bhutatvat = to be, beingness

      THE YOGI IS NOT VIEWING THE OTHER'S DEEP IMPRESSIONS:

      The last sutra (3.19) described how the yogi can become aware of
      another person's mind, by the method of focusing on the effect (or
      imprint) of that other person's thought on the yogi's own mind. Here,
      in sutra 3.20, it is being acknowledged that the observing yogi also
      does not have access to the deeper source from which that thought
      process arose. Here is the same brief outline of the process that was
      in 3.20:

      1) Samskaras in the other mind: The deep impressions in the other
      person's mind awaken and come forward into active mental process.

      2) Presented ideas or notions: Having awakened, the mental process
      from these impressions is now active in the field of mind of the
      other person.

      3) Impressions coming to our mind: That mental process now comes to
      our mind, as viewer, with which we practice samyama (concentration,
      meditation, samadhi, 3.4-3.6)

      In other words, by samyama on the presented ideas or notions (#2),
      there comes knowledge about the nature of the mind of which the are a
      part. The deeper level of samskaras, which are the source of that
      more surface knowledge, (#1) is not available in this process of
      observation. Once again, the important part for our own sadhana
      (practice) is in dealing with the coloring of our own reactions to
      the mental process we experience.

      ATTAINMENTS AND OBSTACLES:

      As with the other subtle experiences this is seen to be both an
      attainment and an obstacle, and is set aside (3.38) with non-
      attachment (1.15).

      http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras.htm
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