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Yoga Sutras 3.9-3.12: Three Types of Transitions

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  • Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati
    Yoga Sutras 3.9-3.12 THREE TYPES OF TRANSITIONS http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-30916.htm#3.9 ************************ YOGA SUTRAS 3.9-3.12:
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      Yoga Sutras 3.9-3.12
      THREE TYPES OF TRANSITIONS
      http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-30916.htm#3.9

      ************************
      YOGA SUTRAS 3.9-3.12:
      ************************

      That high level of mastery called nirodhah-parinamah occurs in the
      moment of transition when there is a convergence of the rising
      tendency of deep impressions, the subsiding tendency, and the
      attention of the mind field itself. The steady flow of this state
      (nirodhah-parinamah) continues by the creation of deep impressions
      (samskaras) from doing the practice. The mastery called samadhi-
      parinamah is the transition whereby the tendency to all-pointedness
      subsides, while the tendency to one-pointedness arises. The mastery
      called ekagrata-parinamah is the transition whereby the same one-
      pointedness arises and subsides sequentially.

      ************************
      YOGA SUTRA 3.9:
      ************************

      That high level of mastery called nirodhah-parinamah occurs in the
      moment of transition when there is a convergence of the rising
      tendency of deep impressions, the subsiding tendency, and the
      attention of the mind field itself.
      (vyutthana nirodhah samskara abhibhava pradurbhavau nirodhah ksana
      chitta anvayah nirodhah-parinamah)

      vyutthana = emergence, coming out, rising
      nirodhah = mastery, coordination, control, regulation, setting aside
      of
      samskara = subtle impressions, imprints in the unconscious, deepest
      habits
      abhibhava = disappearance, subsiding
      pradurbhavau = manifesting, appearance
      nirodhah = mastery, coordination, control, regulation, setting aside
      of
      ksana = with the moment, instant, infinitesimal time (3.53)
      chitta = of the consciousness of the mind-field
      anvayah = connection with, conjunction
      nirodhah-parinamah = transition to nirodhah (nirodhah = mastery,
      coordination, control, regulation, setting aside of (1.2); parinamah
      = transition, transformation, of change, result, consequence,
      mutative effect, alteration) (2.15)

      LETTING GO OF THE AUDIENCE:

      Imagine that you are in a lecture hall several minutes before the
      speaker has come to give his or her talk. All of the people are
      standing around the lecture hall, and the room is filled with a loud
      rumble of the collective voices of many conversations. You are
      watching this, taking it all in, with your mind pulling your senses
      here and there. Then, the speaker enters the hall, walks to the
      podium, and begins to speak. Two things happen simultaneously: your
      attention moves away from all of the other people, while at the same
      time, your attention becomes directed towards the speaker.

      MASTERY OVER TRANSITIONS:

      The transition away from the people in the audience is somewhat like
      nirodhah parinima (the transition of suspension), and the companion
      transition of attention moving towards the speaker is somewhat like
      samadhi parinima (the transition to absorption, 3.11). When the
      attention repeatedly remains with the speaker, this is somewhat like
      ekagra parinima (the transition where the same absorption repeatedly
      arises and subsides, 3.12). It is the mastery over that process of
      transition itself that the Yogi is seeking. If you have mastery over
      these processes of transition, then you have mastery over all of the
      thought patterns, which might otherwise control your mind, thoughts,
      actions, and speech.

      THERE IS A CONVERGENCE WITH THE TRANSITIONS:

      The samskaras or deep impressions naturally arise through a
      transition phase between inactive and active. Those samskaras also
      naturally return from the active phase to the inactive. When there is
      a convergence (anyaya) of the attention with the rising and falling
      transitions, a high degree of mastery comes. This is an extremely
      subtle process of samyama (3.4-3.6).

      ************************
      YOGA SUTRA 3.10:
      ************************

      The steady flow of this state (nirodhah-parinamah) continues by the
      creation of deep impressions (samskaras) from doing the practice.
      (tasya prashanta vahita samskarat)

      tasya = its (referring to the mind in the state of nirodhah-
      parinamah, in the last sutra)
      prashanta = undisturbed, steady, continuous, peaceful, calm, tranquil
      vahita = flow
      samskara = subtle impressions, imprints in the unconscious, deepest
      habits

      CREATING SUBTLE GROOVES IN THE MIND FIELD:

      More surface level, or worldly habits often control our actions,
      speech, and thoughts. Here, at even this extremely subtle level of
      practice, new habit patterns are intentionally formed as a result of
      repeated practice. However, in this case we are intentionally forming
      extremely deep habit patterns of how to stay in such a deeply
      tranquil state whenever we want. That deep tranquility is the new
      habit pattern. Recall that one of the two foundation practices
      (abhyasa and vairagya, 1.12-1.16) has to do with seeking stable
      tranquility (1.13).

      ************************
      YOGA SUTRA 3.11:
      ************************

      The mastery called samadhi-parinamah is the transition whereby the
      tendency to all-pointedness subsides, while the tendency to one-
      pointedness arises.
      (sarvarathata ekagrata ksaya udaya chittasya samadhi-parinamah)

      sarvarathata = many pointedness, all pointedness, experiencing all
      points
      ekagrata = one-pointedness
      ksaya = dwindling, destruction, decay
      udaya = rising, uprising
      chittasya = of the consciousness of the mind-field
      samadhi-parinamah = transition to samadhi (samadhi = meditation in
      its higher state, deep absorption of meditation, the state of
      perfected concentration; parinamah = transition, transformation, of
      change, result, consequence, mutative effect, alteration)

      ALL POINTEDNESS:

      The state of all-pointedness refers to the tendency of the mind to be
      drawn in countless different directions. In the state of samadhi-
      parinamah being described, this tendency towards all-pointedness
      subsides. It does not mean that those countless objects themselves go
      away, as they are not destroyed. What it does mean is that the
      inclination of the mind towards this stance of all-pointedness
      subsides. In other words, it is only one thing that is subsiding, and
      that is the tendency towards the endless diversity presented to the
      mind.

      ONE-POINTEDNESS:

      The state of one-pointedness refers to the tendency of the mind to
      concentrate or focus on a single point. If you observe your own
      mental functioning, you can easily see both tendencies. The mind
      tends both to the diversity of all-pointedness, as well as to one -
      pointedness. We all experience both of these tendencies in daily
      life. Here in this sutra, it is this one-pointedness that is
      arising.

      ONE RISES, WHILE THE OTHER FALLS:

      Here, in the high state of samadhi-parinamah, there is witnessing of
      this transition into samadhi, whereby the all-pointedness subsides,
      and the one-pointedness arises.

      ************************
      YOGA SUTRA 3.12:
      ************************

      The mastery called ekagrata-parinamah is the transition whereby the
      same one-pointedness arises and subsides sequentially.
      (tatah punah shanta-uditau tulya-pratyayau chittasya ekagrata-
      parinimah)

      tatah = then
      punah = again, sequentially
      shanta-uditau = the subsiding and arising, past and present
      tulya-pratyayau = having similar
      chittasya = of the consciousness of the mind-field
      ekagrata-parinimah = transition of one-pointedness (ekagrata = one-
      pointedness; parinamah = transition, transformation, of change,
      result, consequence, mutative effect, alteration)

      RISING AND SUBSIDING OF THE SAME ONE-POINTEDNESS:

      In the last sutra, it was described that all-pointedness subsided and
      one-pointedness arose. Now, in this sutra, the subject is where that
      one-pointedness subsides, only to arise again. The many-pointedness
      is not there, only the cycling and recycling of the one-pointedness.
      It is this transition that is being witnessed.

      THREE TRANSITIONS:

      Thus, we are referring to three forms of transition in sutras 3.9-
      3.12. The first one related to the transition of the mastery of
      thought patterns itself. The second related to the transitioning rise
      of one-pointedness of mind, along with the subsiding of the many-
      pointedness. The third (in the current sutra) relates to the
      transition of the repeated rising and subsiding of the same one-
      pointedness.

      MASTERY OVER TRANSITIONS:

      Once again, this witnessing and mastery over transitions themselves
      gives mastery over the underlying thought patterns and processes
      themselves. In other words, master the transitions, and you master
      the thought process; master the thought process, and you can go
      beyond, ultimately to experience the center of consciousness (1.3).

      http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras.htm
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