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Yoga Sutras 2.15-2.16: A discriminating person sees all experience as painful

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  • Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati
    Yoga Sutras 2.15-2.16: A DISCRIMINATING PERSON SEES ALL EXPERIENCE AS PAINFUL http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-21225.htm#2.15 YOGA SUTRAS 2.15-2.16: A wise,
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 20 8:27 PM
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      Yoga Sutras 2.15-2.16:
      A DISCRIMINATING PERSON SEES ALL EXPERIENCE AS PAINFUL
      http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-21225.htm#2.15

      YOGA SUTRAS 2.15-2.16: A wise, discriminating person sees all worldly
      experiences as painful, because of reasoning that all these
      experiences lead to more consequences, anxiety, and deep habits
      (samskaras), as well as acting in opposition to the natural
      qualities. Because the worldly experiences are seen as painful, it is
      the pain, which is yet to come that is to be avoided and discarded.


      YOGA SUTRA 2.15: A wise, discriminating person sees all worldly
      experiences as painful, because of reasoning that all these
      experiences lead to more consequences, anxiety, and deep habits
      (samskaras), as well as acting in opposition to the natural qualities.
      (parinama tapa samskara duhkhaih guna vrittih virodhat cha duhkham
      eva sarvam vivekinah)

      parinama = of change, transformation, result, consequence, mutative
      effect, alteration
      tapa = anxiety, anguish, pain, suffering, misery, torment
      samskara = subtle impressions, imprints in the unconscious, deepest
      habits
      duhkhaih = by reason of suffering, sorrows
      guna = of the qualities, gunas of prakriti (sattvas, rajas, tamas)
      vrittih = operations, activities, fluctuations, modifications,
      changes, or various forms of the mind-field
      virodhat = because of reasoning the contradictory
      cha = and
      duhkham = because of the pain, suffering, sorrow
      eva = is only
      sarvam = all
      vivekinah = to one who discriminates, discerns

      DISCRIMINATION COMES IN TIME:
      Seeing all worldly experiences as painful is not a mere opinion or
      belief system that one cultivates because of following some certain
      spiritual path. Rather, it comes from the process of discrimination,
      and this takes time and practice. By repeatedly seeing the process of
      the playing out of samskaras (karmashaya), leading to more deep
      impressions, and again recycling, the Yogi comes to conclude for
      himself or herself that the entire process is bringing nothing but
      pain in the long run.

      WISDOM, NOT DEPRESSION:
      To simply read this, that everything worldly brings pain, can seem
      rather depressing or fatalistic. This is definitely not the case.
      This insight comes with wisdom, with seeing clearly the nature of the
      temporal process. The Yogi feels a sense of joy in this insight, as
      it causes an even greater drive towards Self-realization, the direct
      experience of that eternal Self, which is not subject to change,
      death, decay, or decomposition.

      NAME AND FORM OF THE PRIME ELEMENTS:
      The Yogi comes to see that the primal elements or gunas (sattvas,
      rajas, and tamas) just keep changing names and forms. It is that
      incessant transitioning process that is seen to be not worthy of
      continuing unabated. Eventually, through the practices of Yoga, the
      gunas themselves are resolved back into their cause, leading to
      liberation (4.32-4.34).

      GOING IN THE WRONG DIRECTION:
      The Yogi also comes to see that all of these activities are outward
      bound, moving directly in the opposite direction from the eternal
      Self. Because of that insight, he or she wants even more strongly to
      go inward, in pursuit of the direct experience of pure consciousness,
      or Purusha (3.56, 4.34).

      SEE ALSO the article:
      Sankhya Yoga, Prakriti and its Evolutes:
      Returning to Self-realization
      http://www.swamij.com/prakriti-purusha-sankhya.htm


      YOGA SUTRA 2.16: Because the worldly experiences are seen as painful,
      it is the pain, which is yet to come that is to be avoided and
      discarded.
      (heyam duhkham anagatam)

      heyam = to be discarded, avoided, prevented
      duhkham = pain, suffering, sorrow
      anagatam = which has not yet come, in the future

      CURRENTLY MANIFESTING:
      The three consequences of birth, span of life, and experiences (2.13)
      may be playing out in the current time or life, and may be
      experienced as pain or pleasure (2.14). One has to deal with these
      impressions and their actions (karmas) in the here and now.

      MANIFESTING LATER:
      Other samskaras of the karmashaya (2.12) are not driven by their
      current coloring or life circumstance to play out at the present
      moment. They remain in their latent form in the latent part of the
      mind, destined to come to life and play out later.

      EXPLORE THE LATENT:
      The Yogi comes to the point of practices where it is not only the
      currently manifesting karmas that are dealt with. Rather, he or she
      intentionally explores the unconscious processing part of the mind
      and the latent part of the mind, so as to uncover, attenuate, and
      eliminate the coloring (klishta) (1.5, 2.3) of these deep
      impressions, as was described in sutra 2.4. In this way, the effects
      (karma) of those deep impressions are discarded, avoided, or
      prevented (hevam). Then the absolute or pure consciousness behind the
      veil can be experienced.

      SEE ALSO the article:
      Four Levels and Three Domains of Consciousness
      http://www.swamij.com/levelsdimensions.htm

      AS SENSITIVE AS THE SURFACE OF THE EYEBALL:
      In describing how the Yogi wants to avoid the pain that is still to
      come, the commentator Vyasa says that the Yogi's perception has
      become as sensitive as the surface of an eye-ball. It is because of
      this highly refined sense of self-awareness that he or she discovers
      the future karmas in the karmashaya, and wants to deal with them long
      before they have the chance to come to fruition.

      THE SEER AND THE SEEN:
      The key to this process of avoiding future karmas is breaking the tie
      between the seer and the seen (2.17), as described in the remaining
      sutras of this section.
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