Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Introduction to Yoga Sutras 2.12-2.25 Breaking the Alliance of Karma

Expand Messages
  • Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati
    Introduction to Yoga Sutras 2.12-2.25 BREAKING THE ALLIANCE OF KARMA http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-21225.htm DISCONNECTING THE SEER AND SEEN: The key to
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 2, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Introduction to Yoga Sutras 2.12-2.25
      BREAKING THE ALLIANCE OF KARMA
      http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras-21225.htm

      DISCONNECTING THE SEER AND SEEN:
      The key to breaking the cycle of karma is that the connection
      between "seer" and that which is "seen" is set aside (2.17). This
      allows one to avoid even the future karmas that have not yet
      manifested (2.16). Ignorance, or avidya (2.5), is the cause of this
      alliance (2.24), and eliminating this ignorance is the means of
      ending the alliance (2.25). This, in turn, breaks the cycle of karma.

      CONSEQUENCES OF THE COLORINGS:
      The colorings (1.5, 2.3)(klishta/aklishta) lead to birth, span of
      life, and experiences (2.13). These are painful or not painful
      (2.14), though the yogi comes to see them all as painful (2.15), and
      thus wants to avoid these (2.16).

      See also this article on klishta/aklishta
      http://www.swamij.com/klishta-aklishta.htm

      THE SUBTLER PROCESS OF BREAKING THE ALLIANCE:
      Descriptions of the nature of the objects are given (2.18), along
      with the subtle states of the elements (2.19), and explanation of how
      the seer cognizes them (2.20). It is explained that the objects exist
      for the benefit of the seer (2.21), and that they cease to exist when
      one knows their true nature (2.22), though continuing to be
      experienced by others. Even so, it is explained, the relationship
      between seer and seen had to be there, so that the seer could
      eventually experience the subtler truth (2.23).

      FOUNDATION:
      The ability to break the alliance with karma as described in sutras
      2.12-2.25 is built on a foundation of prerequisites, including
      stabilizing the mind (1.33-1.39) and minimizing the gross colorings
      (kleshas) of the mind (2.1-2.9).

      KEY IS DISCRIMINATIVE KNOWLEDGE:
      The eight rungs of Yoga and discriminative knowledge are the key
      tools in this process, and are described in the next section (2.26-
      2.29).

      SUMMARY OF YOGA SUTRAS 2.12-2.25 ON BREAKING THE ALLIANCE OF KARMA:
      Latent impressions that are colored (karmashaya) result from other
      actions (karmas) that were brought about by colorings (kleshas), and
      become active and experienced in a current life or a future life. As
      long as those colorings (kleshas) remains at the root, three
      consequences are produced: 1) birth, 2) span of life, and 3)
      experiences in that life. Because of having the nature of merits or
      demerits (virtue or vice), these three (birth, span of life, and
      experiences) may be experienced as either pleasure or pain.

      A wise, discriminating person sees all worldly experiences as
      painful, because of reasoning that all these experiences lead to more
      consequences, anxiety, and deep habits (samskaras), as well as acting
      in opposition to the natural qualities. Because the worldly
      experiences are seen as painful, it is the pain, which is yet to come
      that is to be avoided and discarded.

      The uniting of the seer (the subject, or experiencer) with the seen
      (the object, or that which is experienced) is the cause or connection
      to be avoided.

      The objects (or knowables) are by their nature of: 1) illumination or
      sentience, 2) activity or mutability, or 3) inertia or stasis; they
      consist of the elements and the powers of the senses, and exist for
      the purpose of experiencing the world and for liberation or
      enlightenment. There are four states of the elements (gunas), and
      these are: 1) diversified, specialized, or particularized (vishesha),
      2) undiversified, unspecialized, or unparticularized (avishesha), 3)
      indicator-only, undifferentiated phenomenal, or marked only (linga-
      matra), and 4) without indicator, noumenal, or without mark
      (alingani).

      The Seer is but the force of seeing itself, appearing to see or
      experience that which is presented as a cognitive principle. The
      essence or nature of the knowable objects exists only to serve as the
      objective field for pure consciousness. Although knowable objects
      cease to exist in relation to one who has experienced their
      fundamental, formless true nature, the appearance of the knowable
      objects is not destroyed, for their existence continues to be shared
      by others who are still observing them in their grosser forms.

      Having an alliance, or relationship between objects and the Self is
      the necessary means by which there can subsequently be realization of
      the true nature of those objects by that very Self. Avidya or
      ignorance (2.3-2.5), the condition of ignoring, is the underlying
      cause that allows this alliance to appear to exist.

      By causing a lack of avidya, or ignorance there is then an absence of
      the alliance, and this leads to a freedom known as a state of
      liberation or enlightenment for the Seer.

      SEE ALSO THESE ARTICLES:
      Karma and the Sources of Action, Speech, and Thought
      http://www.swamij.com/karma.htm

      Archery and the Art of Reducing Karma
      http://www.swamij.com/archerykarma.htm

      Coordinating the Four Functions of Mind
      http://www.swamij.com/fourfunctionsmind.htm

      Uncoloring your Colored Thoughts
      http://www.swamij.com/klishta-aklishta.htm
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.