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The nature of a sage who knows the Self

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  • Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati
    Excerpted from: CREST JEWEL OF DISCRIMINATION (Vivekachudamani) By Adi Sankaracharya, 788-820 CE, Translated by Swami Madhavananda Published by Advaita Ashram,
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 28 7:36 AM
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      Excerpted from:
      CREST JEWEL OF DISCRIMINATION (Vivekachudamani)
      By Adi Sankaracharya, 788-820 CE,
      Translated by Swami Madhavananda
      Published by Advaita Ashram, Kolkattaranslation

      THE NATURE OF A SAGE WHO KNOWS THE SELF

      The knower of the Atman, who wears no outward mark and is unattached
      to external things, rests on this body without identification, and
      experiences all sorts of sense-objects as they come, through others'
      wish, like a child.

      Established in the ethereal plane of Absolute Knowledge, he wanders
      in the world, sometimes like a madman, sometimes like a child and at
      other times like a ghoul, having no other clothes on his person
      except the quarters, or sometimes wearing clothes, or perhaps skins
      at other times.

      The sage, living alone, enjoys the sense-objects, being the very
      embodiment of desirelessness – always satisfied with his own Self,
      and himself present at the All.

      Sometimes a fool, sometimes a sage, sometimes possessed of regal
      splendour; sometimes wandering, sometimes behaving like a motionless
      python, sometimes wearing a benignant expression; sometimes honoured,
      sometimes insulted, sometimes unknown – thus lives the man of
      realisation, ever happy with Supreme Bliss.

      Though without riches, yet ever content; though helpless, yet very
      powerful, though not enjoying the sense-objects, yet eternally
      satisfied; though without an exemplar, yet looking upon all with an
      eye of equality.

      Though doing, yet inactive; though experiencing fruits of past
      actions, yet untouched by them; though possessed of a body, yet
      without identification with it; though limited, yet omnipresent is he.

      Neither pleasure nor pain, nor good nor evil, ever touches this
      knower of Brahman, who always lives without the body-idea.

      Pleasure or pain, or good or evil, affects only him who has
      connections with the gross body etc., and identifies himself with
      these. How can good or evil, or their effects, touch the sage who has
      identified himself with the Reality and thereby shattered his bondage?

      http://www.swamij.com
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