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Yoga Sutras 2.1-2.9: Minimizing gross colorings that veil the Self

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  • Swami Jnaneshvara Bharati
    Yoga Sutras 2.1-2.9: Minimizing gross colorings that veil the Self http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras/yoga-sutras-20109.htm (for more info) ... Reduce colorings
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 15, 2004
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      Yoga Sutras 2.1-2.9:
      Minimizing gross colorings that veil the Self
      http://www.swamij.com/yoga-sutras/yoga-sutras-20109.htm
      (for more info)

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      Reduce colorings by Kriya Yoga: In these first few sutras of Chapter
      2, specific methods are being introduced on how to minimize the gross
      colorings (kleshas) of the mental obstacles, which veil the true Self.
      (The later sutras of this chapter deal with the the subtle colorings
      of mental obstacles).

      Living the three practices of Kriya Yoga: The first part of the
      process of minimizing the gross coloring is called Kriya Yoga, and
      leads one in the direction of samadhi. Kriya Yoga involves three parts
      (2.1-2.2):

      1. Training the senses (tapas)
      2. Studying yourself in the context of teachings (svadhyaya)
      3. Surrender of klishta (colored) thought impressions (ishvara
      pranidhana)

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      2.1 Yoga in the form of action (kriya yoga) has three parts: 1)
      training and purifying the senses (tapas), 2) self-study in the
      context of teachings (svadhyaya), and 3) devotion and letting go into
      the creative source from which we emerged (ishvara pranidhana).

      2.2 That Yoga of actions (kriya yoga) is practiced to bring about
      samadhi and to minimize the colored thought patterns (kleshas).

      2.3 There are five kinds of coloring (kleshas): 1) forgetting, or
      ignorance about the true nature of things (avidya), 2) I-ness,
      individuality, or egoism (asmita), 3) attachment or addiction to
      mental impressions or objects (raga), 4) aversion to thought patterns
      or objects (dvesha), and 5) love of these as being life itself, as
      well as fear of their loss as being death.

      2.4 The root forgetting or ignorance of the nature of things (avidya)
      is the breeding ground for the other of the five colorings (kleshas),
      and each of these is in one of four states: 1) dormant or inactive, 2)
      attenuated or weakened, 3) interrupted or separated from temporarily,
      or 4) active and producing thoughts or actions to varying degrees.
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