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Re: [Y-Mail] Facile mail reading (was New Yahoo Mail Basic - How to select all emails on screen and where is yahoo notes?)

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  • Shal Farley
    Bruce, ... Yup. They definitely missed Ctrl+click functionality. ... Quite. By the way, I hope you weren t taking my questions/suggestions as unsympathetic. I
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 18, 2013
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      Bruce,

      > Here is what I used to do in Yahoo Classic. I would open my inbox and
      > scan through my messages, right clicking/opening in new tab any mails of
      > interest. I could continue to scan my inbox opening new emails as those
      > emails would be opening.

      Yup. They definitely missed Ctrl+click functionality.

      > Does that answer your question, Shal?

      Quite.

      By the way, I hope you weren't taking my questions/suggestions as unsympathetic. I don't use web mail at all (except at times like this when I'm poking at it to see how it works) so even though I am a long-time Firefox user, the nuanced interactions between the browser's UI and Yahoo Mail's coding, classic or new, are unfamiliar to me (getting to be "were").

      > PS I tried right clicking an email and opening in a new tab and all it
      > did was open a new tab with the same inbox.

      Hmm... I wonder if that's a browser difference. But further poking shows me that opening a new browser tab from a message tab in Yahoo Mail wasn't doing what I thought. The browser tab that loaded in the background opened on the bottommost (oldest) message in my inbox. Essentially a random mail message, as "bottommost" is a moving target (look there and more load into the list).

      Regardless though, even if I can end up with a multitude of browser tabs each opened on a desired message from my inbox, the effort required to do so completely misses a key attribute of your usage in classic: background loading of the desired mails while you continue scanning the inbox. In other words, something that is /facile/ rather than awkward.

      I use that very technique all the time when scanning the Suggestions board, Answers, my groups' Messages lists, and other forums and boards with a list of items of interest. So I get how broken you feel.

      > I am just incredibly frustrated that they would take away something that
      > was near perfect and give us something that is virtually worthless for
      > me. Who does that?

      Altogether too many companies. My wife and I have often complained that just when we find something we like and that works, they discontinue it. And that's not even talking web sites -- physical products.

      I wish I knew of a way to ensure that the Yahoo Mail developers would read it.

      I think if I cared about the functionality of Yahoo Mail I'd take your observations and break them into discrete, bite-sized, cogent suggestions and feed them to the Feedback form ("Send Feedback" link in the gear icon on the extreme right). Crafting a compelling suggestion usually takes me quite a bit of effort.

      The core suggestion I think I'd make is to ask that the relevant browser short-cuts (Ctrl+click, Shift+click, Ctrl+Shift+click) be allowed to work as if the subject (and from?) text are links to the message: that they open the message in a new tab, window, or tab and switch, respectively. The objection the developer may have is that Ctrl+click and Shift+click are already assigned to the usual list functionality of toggling or extending selection, respectively. I would preemptively answer that by saying the selection function could be kept in the other columns (especially in the checkbox column where it is most natural), but that the subject column specifically should be treated as links.

      I would also suggest that the open in browser tab and browser window functions (without switching) be added to the context (right-mouse) menu. I'd have to think about whether I'd make that a separate suggestion or part of the other one.

      -- Shal
    • Bruce Lund
      ...   Not at all Shal. I know how active (and helpful) you are here and I also like that you try to drill down. That is part of getting to the bottom of
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 20, 2013
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        >>>By the way, I hope you weren't taking my questions/suggestions as unsympathetic.
         
        Not at all Shal. I know how active (and helpful) you are here and I also like that you try to drill down. That is part of getting to the bottom of things. (That is almost redundant, isn't it, drilling down is what helps you to get to the bottom of things!) And you are clearly trying to do that with your questions and comments. And your responses also indicate that you "get it." You use tabs in much the same way as I do, even if not in mail.

        It is kind of like when I am reading an article on the web and there are links for other articles. I don't just go click on the link and start reading the new article, abandoning what I was reading. That would be just silly. I open it in a new tab so when I finish the article I am reading I just close the tab on that one and, voila, the next article is just waiting for me to read.

        Same thing with Classic (Basic) mail. When I am scrolling through my inbox, I don't necessarily want to abandon going through my inbox to read any particular email at just that moment. I just want it to be there when I finish going through my inbox.

        And I know I said it at the end of one of my other emails, but I will say it again. Thanks for your interest and help. It is much appreciated, especially because webmail.is not your method of choice for reading email.

        Bruce Lund

        PS I am seriously considering sending a snail mail "message" to Marissa Mayer. One of the downsides to email and all of the social media is that it is so easy to send messages that anything that gets sent is likely to get lost in the flood of other messages. Until all of the homeland security measures, that was the best way to reach elected officials, although now your mail is literally fried (well, not "literally" fried, although definitely affected) by radiation before it reaches its destination. I suspect a letter to the CEO would be more likely to be read by a "real" human being than yet another complaint/suggestion to their automated system.



        From: Shal Farley <shal@...>
        To: Y-Mail@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, July 18, 2013 2:58 AM
        Subject: Re: [Y-Mail] Facile mail reading (was New Yahoo Mail Basic - How to select all emails on screen and where is yahoo notes?)

        Bruce,

        > Here is what I used to do in Yahoo Classic. I would open my inbox and
        > scan through my messages, right clicking/opening in new tab any mails of
        > interest. I could continue to scan my inbox opening new emails as those
        > emails would be opening.

        Yup. They definitely missed Ctrl+click functionality.

        > Does that answer your question, Shal?

        Quite.

        By the way, I hope you weren't taking my questions/suggestions as unsympathetic. I don't use web mail at all (except at times like this when I'm poking at it to see how it works) so even though I am a long-time Firefox user, the nuanced interactions between the browser's UI and Yahoo Mail's coding, classic or new, are unfamiliar to me (getting to be "were").

        > PS I tried right clicking an email and opening in a new tab
        and all it
        > did was open a new tab with the same inbox.

        Hmm... I wonder if that's a browser difference. But further poking shows me that opening a new browser tab from a message tab in Yahoo Mail wasn't doing what I thought. The browser tab that loaded in the background opened on the bottommost (oldest) message in my inbox. Essentially a random mail message, as "bottommost" is a moving target (look there and more load into the list).

        Regardless though, even if I can end up with a multitude of browser tabs each opened on a desired message from my inbox, the effort required to do so completely misses a key attribute of your usage in classic: background loading of the desired mails while you continue scanning the inbox. In other words, something that is /facile/ rather than awkward.

        I use that very technique all the time when scanning the Suggestions board, Answers, my groups' Messages lists, and other forums and boards with a list of items of interest. So I get how broken you feel.

        > I am just incredibly frustrated that they would take away something that
        > was near perfect and give us something that is virtually worthless for
        > me. Who does that?

        Altogether too many companies. My wife and I have often complained that just when we find something we like and that works, they discontinue it. And that's not even talking web sites -- physical products.

        I wish I knew of a way to ensure that the Yahoo Mail developers would read it.

        I think if I cared about the functionality of Yahoo Mail I'd take your observations and break them into discrete, bite-sized, cogent suggestions and feed them to the Feedback form ("Send Feedback" link in the gear icon on the extreme right). Crafting a compelling suggestion usually takes me quite a bit of effort.

        The core suggestion I think I'd make is to ask that the relevant browser short-cuts (Ctrl+click, Shift+click, Ctrl+Shift+click) be allowed to work as if the subject (and from?) text are links to the message: that they open the message in a new tab, window, or tab and switch, respectively. The objection the developer may have is that Ctrl+click and Shift+click are already assigned to the usual list functionality of toggling or extending selection, respectively. I would preemptively answer that by saying the selection function could be kept in the other columns (especially in the checkbox column where it is most natural), but that the subject column specifically should be treated as links.

        I would also suggest that the open in browser tab and browser window functions (without switching) be added to the context (right-mouse) menu. I'd have to think about whether I'd make that a separate suggestion or part of the other one.

        -- Shal
      • Shal Farley
        Bruce, ... Ordinarily I would scoff at the idea, but your explanation to Sasafrass is so lucid that I think a message conveying that use case might be well
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 20, 2013
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          Bruce,

          > PS I am seriously considering sending a snail mail "message" to Marissa Mayer.

          Ordinarily I would scoff at the idea, but your explanation to Sasafrass is so lucid that I think a message conveying that use case might be well received.

          In part it is about the user experience of not waiting for page loads, but it is really more about maintaining ones mental "flow" during the separate activities of evaluating messages and acting on them. People who live with gigabit access and latest generation hardware might not understand the former, but the latter ought to make sense even to those who fancy themselves "multi-taskers".

          -- Shal
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