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Re: Need help with "skipping" problem

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  • ballendo
    Fair enough. (FWIW, I posted my replies before seeing your subsequent posts..) Hope the new control fixes things for you! Ballendo ... I ... my ... and ...
    Message 1 of 33 , Apr 8, 2005
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      Fair enough.

      (FWIW, I posted my replies before seeing your subsequent posts..)

      Hope the new control fixes things for you!

      Ballendo

      --- In Xylotex@yahoogroups.com, "squeakylizard2002" <bcgraves@c...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Sorry dude I won't say. I am not here to bash anyone or anything,
      I
      > am just looking for some help fixing my problem. If you had read
      my
      > last post you would have seen that I sent the control back to him
      and
      > he is getting me another. All of the info I have gotten has been
      > helpful and has made me a little more aware. I am not use to
      Stepper
      > motors, I have always used Servo motors.
      >
      > Thanks again for everyone's input.
      >
      > --- In Xylotex@yahoogroups.com, "ballendo" <ballendo@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hello,
      > >
      > > Who was the seller who won't help you? What kind of machine is
      this?
      > >
      > > (Yes, a Mill<G>, but which brand?)
      > >
      > > Thank you,
      > >
      > > Ballendo
      > >
      > > --- In Xylotex@yahoogroups.com, "squeakylizard2002"
      <bcgraves@c...>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I bought a cnc mill with a Xylotex drive and can't get any help
      > > from
      > > > the place I bought the mill. It is only 4 months old. The
      > problem
      > > I
      > > > am having is the y-axis is "skipping" while cutting. It
      appears
      > to
      > > do
      > > > it only when both the x & y axis are moving together. Like
      > cutting
      > > > circles or diaginal lines. It doesn't do it on the first cut
      but
      > > will
      > > > start after that. Sometimes I can cut the same part 4 times
      and
      > it
      > > > won't do it and sometimes is will start on the very next pass.
      > At
      > > > first I thought it was a bad motor, but I swapped motors and it
      > > still
      > > > had the skip on the y-axis. I have been able to isolate it to
      > one
      > > > cable. Which ever motor I plug the cable into, that axis will
      > > skip.
      > > > It will do it in a dry cycle as well as in the cut so I know
      that
      > I
      > > am
      > > > not putting to much load on it. I don't think it is heat
      because
      > > we
      > > > have not had any days over 80 degrees yet. Any help would be
      > much
      > > > appreciated.
    • ballendo
      David, If you re going to post that I m incorrect; please ALSO post what you feel is the correct answer. I didn t say the design was necessarily a good one; I
      Message 33 of 33 , Apr 10, 2005
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        David,

        If you're going to post that I'm incorrect; please ALSO post what you
        feel is the correct answer.

        I didn't say the design was necessarily a good one; I just explained
        how it came to be what it is.

        So, what WAS the primary failure component of the early pc's?

        Interestingly, you say nope,wrong again in the second part of your
        reply; then go on to restate just what I've said. That the poor
        design was kept through inertia(follow the leader) and backward
        compatibility (human response)...

        Ballendo

        --- In Xylotex@yahoogroups.com, "David Lee" <dslee@t...> wrote:
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: ballendo [mailto:ballendo@y...]
        > Sent: Saturday, April 09, 2005 01:15 PM
        > To: Xylotex@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Xylotex] Re: Need help with "skipping" problem
        >
        > Hello,
        >
        > You might rather ask why every pc on the planet NOW has a SEPARATE
        > fan blowing air directly on the uP heat sink...
        >
        > Here's your answer. PC's are/were meant to be as inexpensive as
        > possible. The fan in the first pc's was primarily concerned with
        > keeping the POWER SUPPLY cool. Any additional cooling of the cabinet
        > was somewhat incidental--though planned for-- and not terribly
        > necessary at the original low speeds and component density. Also
        > large boxes, remember? Meaning convection cooling and ambient were
        > enough, so why pay more? Just be sure the power supply is cool
        > enough, and go from there.
        >
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        --------
        > ----
        >
        > What you say above may be true but, notwithstanding the fact that
        even in
        > THAT application, the fan would have been more efficient if it were
        blowing
        > ON the power supply rather than trying to suck the air through it.
        It
        > doesn't change that fact that EE's should do the EEing and give way
        to the
        > ME's to do the MEing.
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        --------
        > ----
        >
        >
        > BTW, do you recall what was the primary failure component of the
        > early PC's? Yep, power supply.
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        --------
        > ----
        >
        > Nope - wrong!
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        --------
        > ----
        >
        >
        > From that point in time on out it became a business and
        > product "inertia" and "backward compatibility" thing. Which worked
        > for awhile.
        >
        > When it stopped working we saw huge amounts of attention given to
        > ADDITIONAL at-the-source cooling...
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        --------
        > ----
        >
        > Nope, wrong again! It was a typical human response of follow the
        leader.
        > The first guy didn't do his homework and the others just fell in
        line with
        > him.
        >
        > --------------------------------------------------------------------
        --------
        > ----
        > And now we see folks "modding" higher end, high heat systems in
        > exactly the way described...
        >
        > Not hard to understand at all if you trace it through the years
        >
        > Ballendo
        >
        >
        > --- In Xylotex@yahoogroups.com, Richard Garnish <rdg@m...> wrote:
        > > So why does every PC on the planet (and almost every other item of
        > > rack-mount equipment I've seen or used) use fans to draw air
        > through the
        > > cabinet and blow outwards through the fan? If it's more efficient
        > to
        > > use the fans to force air into the cabinet, why isn't this done
        all
        > the
        > > time?
        > >
        > > Richard
        > >
        > > On Fri, 2005-04-08 at 12:45, David Lee wrote:
        > > > An over-educated MBA once bought us a bunch of bargain basement
        > HP's. Every
        > > > one of them except the one next to the door to the shop would
        die
        > at between
        > > > 10:00 and 11:00 AM. I noticed the one next to the shop door was
        > blasted by
        > > > the cooler shop air every time the door was opened so I secretly
        > reversed
        > > > the fan in mine so that it blew inward. Voila! My box stayed
        > alive while
        > > > the others didn't. I then reversed the fan in everyone's except
        > the MBA's
        > > > and his was the only one that died.
        > > >
        > > > No, I never did change his. Tough apples, huh?
        > > >
        > > > David Lee
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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