Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Carbide bench grinders - How coarse for the diamond and white?

Expand Messages
  • Jim
    Thanks to everyone. I bought the HF grinder and was able to get the manager to honor the internet $119 price tag - thanks again. I plan to replace the wheels
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 4, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Thanks to everyone. I bought the HF grinder and was able to get the
      manager to honor the internet $119 price tag - thanks again.

      I plan to replace the wheels as others have and would like to know
      which coarseness I should buy. It looks like the diamonds are
      available in coarse (100), medium (180) and fine (320). Any
      suggestions? I plan to use it to sharpen (and shape as needed)
      carbide braze-ons and maybe HSS end mills if I'm ambitiuos enough to
      build the tool holder mentioned earlier.

      I've also read that many of you put a white wheel on the other side
      for HSS and general grinding. I see that KDC and others have a 46-K
      wheel and ENCO has a 60, 80, and 100 wheel available. Any
      suggestions?

      I read earlier in another thread that someone was having trouble with
      his green wheel (it was taking forever) and was likely due to filling
      because it was too fine (100?) Is this true for the other wheels?

      My guess is that a moderately coarse white wheel (60 (or maybe 80))
      and maybe a coarse diamond (100) would make for a good combination to
      achieve what the supplied 100 grit green wheels are supposed to
      provide with much greater productivity.

      Thanks for your help.

      Jim
    • Alan Wright
      My diamond wheel is medium (150) grit, and it cuts carbide a little too fast. I think in the future I will try something finer, probably the 220. The 150
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 4, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        My diamond wheel is medium (150) grit, and it cuts carbide
        a little too fast. I think in the future I will try something
        finer, probably the 220. The 150 produces a smooth finish on
        the carbide, however.

        My white wheel, which is a Norton 38A at 80 grit, also seems
        to be a little coarse for HSS. I will probably up that to 100
        or 120 grit next time. However, if you grind larger tool bits
        from scratch fairly often, then you may prefer the coarser
        wheel. I most often grind just the one surface on a "diamond"
        tool (1/4"), which is very quick.

        It's tough to choose when you have only one of each wheel.
        Ideally I'd like to have coarse and fine in both types of
        wheel. :-)

        Alan

        --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "Jim" <schifferjb@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks to everyone. I bought the HF grinder and was able to get
        the
        > manager to honor the internet $119 price tag - thanks again.
        >
        > I plan to replace the wheels as others have and would like to know
        > which coarseness I should buy. It looks like the diamonds are
        > available in coarse (100), medium (180) and fine (320). Any
        > suggestions? I plan to use it to sharpen (and shape as needed)
        > carbide braze-ons and maybe HSS end mills if I'm ambitiuos enough
        to
        > build the tool holder mentioned earlier.
        >
        > I've also read that many of you put a white wheel on the other
        side
        > for HSS and general grinding. I see that KDC and others have a 46-
        K
        > wheel and ENCO has a 60, 80, and 100 wheel available. Any
        > suggestions?
        >
        > I read earlier in another thread that someone was having trouble
        with
        > his green wheel (it was taking forever) and was likely due to
        filling
        > because it was too fine (100?) Is this true for the other wheels?
        >
        > My guess is that a moderately coarse white wheel (60 (or maybe
        80))
        > and maybe a coarse diamond (100) would make for a good combination
        to
        > achieve what the supplied 100 grit green wheels are supposed to
        > provide with much greater productivity.
        >
        > Thanks for your help.
        >
        > Jim
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.