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X1 thrust bearings?

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  • dfaprinting
    I have everything I need to install thrust bearings in the X, Y, and Z axis of my X1, how hard are the mounts? It looks kind of like cast material which might
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 11, 2012
      I have everything I need to install thrust bearings in the X, Y, and Z axis of my X1, how hard are the mounts? It looks kind of like cast material which might be kind of hard to get through the "skin" so I was looking for insight before I wreck a bunch of mills trying to cut the mounts for the bearings.

      Lacking a lathe I intend to use a bolt hole circle with over lapping holes to produce the cutout for the bearings.

      Or would I be better off with some chunks of aluminum and creating new mounts? I did buy an extra set of stock mounts so it isn't like I'll render my machine useless if I mess one of these up.
    • johann_ohnesorg
      In case you don´t know how hard a material is grab a file and try to file it. Soft material will be filed, hardened stuff lets the file slide over the
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 12, 2012
        In case you don´t know how hard a material is grab a file and try to file it. Soft material will be filed, hardened stuff lets the file slide over the material.

        The mounts are cast iron an easy to work.

        Concerning your bearing seats: Get a boring head for your mill or find someone with a lathe and a 4 jaw chuck to drill and bore them for you. Bearings are precison parts and need mouting surfaces that are parallel and in plane with the screws, otherwise they won´t work very well.

        Cheers,
        Johann
      • dfaprinting
        I can probably do a finish cut with them mounted to my rotary table to make sure the surface is flat enough for the bearing to the job properly. Also could I
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 12, 2012
          I can probably do a finish cut with them mounted to my rotary table to make sure the surface is flat enough for the bearing to the job properly. Also could I use the boring head in the mill, should be similar to using it in the lathe except the tool will be spinning instead of the work spinning.

          I did make some marks with my scribe, and the point didn't really sink in very far. I'll try a file and see where I get, I have a feeling I will need to grind the harder outside skin off before being able to cut the metal just like the last time I tried to work with cast iron. Once I was past the skin it wasn't too bad to work on.

          --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "johann_ohnesorg" <bigdukeone@...> wrote:
          >
          > In case you don´t know how hard a material is grab a file and try to file it. Soft material will be filed, hardened stuff lets the file slide over the material.
          >
          > The mounts are cast iron an easy to work.
          >
          > Concerning your bearing seats: Get a boring head for your mill or find someone with a lathe and a 4 jaw chuck to drill and bore them for you. Bearings are precison parts and need mouting surfaces that are parallel and in plane with the screws, otherwise they won´t work very well.
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Johann
          >
        • dfaprinting
          Did the Z axis today since it is easier to make out of the materials I have on hand if I messed up the extra part... Works great now, can t wait to cut the X
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 23, 2012
            Did the Z axis today since it is easier to make out of the materials I have on hand if I messed up the extra part... Works great now, can't wait to cut the X and Y and get everything upgraded.
          • dfaprinting
            FYI, this is so much better now that all 3 axis are done. Managed to take out almost all backlash, smoother control on the wheels. Also had to tighten the gibs
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 5, 2012
              FYI, this is so much better now that all 3 axis are done. Managed to take out almost all backlash, smoother control on the wheels. Also had to tighten the gibs now that I didn't have so much friction from the knobs so over all the machine is working better than ever. It was well worth the time and money spent.
            • wturchyn
              Did you figure out the mods on your own, or is there a web page somewhere which has these details? Photos, bearing part numbers, parts/adapters to make, and/or
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 7, 2012
                Did you figure out the mods on your own, or is there a web page somewhere which has these details? Photos, bearing part numbers, parts/adapters to make, and/or machining required to the original parts?


                --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "dfaprinting" <dfaprinting@...> wrote:
                >
                > FYI, this is so much better now that all 3 axis are done. Managed to take out almost all backlash, smoother control on the wheels. Also had to tighten the gibs now that I didn't have so much friction from the knobs so over all the machine is working better than ever. It was well worth the time and money spent.
                >
              • dfaprinting
                I pretty much figured it out myself. There are a few things on the web but mostly it is a measure and cut deal. If you are in the USA I can pull the
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 7, 2012
                  I pretty much figured it out myself. There are a few things on the web but mostly it is a measure and cut deal. If you are in the USA I can pull the McMaster-Carr part number of the bearings. Then it is just center up on the hole, cut X diameter and Y deep and you are done. Eventually I'll go back and drill a couple of small holes so I can inject fresh oil on the bearings.

                  --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "wturchyn" <walter_wpg@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Did you figure out the mods on your own, or is there a web page somewhere which has these details? Photos, bearing part numbers, parts/adapters to make, and/or machining required to the original parts?
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "dfaprinting" <dfaprinting@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > FYI, this is so much better now that all 3 axis are done. Managed to take out almost all backlash, smoother control on the wheels. Also had to tighten the gibs now that I didn't have so much friction from the knobs so over all the machine is working better than ever. It was well worth the time and money spent.
                  > >
                  >
                • wturchyn
                  If it s not too much trouble, would you be able to post those McMaster-Carr part numbers? No hurry, but might be a project that I and other readers might
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 8, 2012
                    If it's not too much trouble, would you be able to post those McMaster-Carr part numbers? No hurry, but might be a project that I and other readers might eventually do, and it'll be handy to have your work as a starting point. Much appreciated!

                    --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "dfaprinting" <dfaprinting@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I pretty much figured it out myself. There are a few things on the web but mostly it is a measure and cut deal. If you are in the USA I can pull the McMaster-Carr part number of the bearings. Then it is just center up on the hole, cut X diameter and Y deep and you are done. Eventually I'll go back and drill a couple of small holes so I can inject fresh oil on the bearings.
                    >
                  • dfaprinting
                    Remembered that McMaster stores your previous orders for a while, number is 6655K74 which is an 8mm stainless steel thrust bearing, 16mm OD and I remember that
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 8, 2012
                      Remembered that McMaster stores your previous orders for a while, number is 6655K74 which is an 8mm stainless steel thrust bearing, 16mm OD and I remember that they are 0.190 inch thick so I cut the pocket on the wheel side to 0.180 deep to make sure the wheel rides on the thrust bearing. I have a measurement for the screw side written down at work where the mill lives, somewhere around 0.460 inch deep but I'll have to check on Monday. I will advise buying a spare set of the stock mounts so if you make a huge mistake you are not down. The price on the stock mounts is pretty low so really worth having the back up. Check LMS for the stock mounts.

                      The carbide mills I used chopped right through the cast mount like it wasn't even there, made quick work out of the project except one of the screw side I didn't cut deep enough, not sure what happened but the nut does get all the way to the nylon lock part so I need to put some loctite on the control or do a little more machining. Loctite is a lot quicker right now so that's what will happen.

                      --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "wturchyn" <walter_wpg@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > If it's not too much trouble, would you be able to post those McMaster-Carr part numbers? No hurry, but might be a project that I and other readers might eventually do, and it'll be handy to have your work as a starting point. Much appreciated!
                      >
                      > --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, "dfaprinting" <dfaprinting@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > I pretty much figured it out myself. There are a few things on the web but mostly it is a measure and cut deal. If you are in the USA I can pull the McMaster-Carr part number of the bearings. Then it is just center up on the hole, cut X diameter and Y deep and you are done. Eventually I'll go back and drill a couple of small holes so I can inject fresh oil on the bearings.
                      > >
                      >
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