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Re: Suggestions on hearing protection with audio??

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  • Greg
    I ended up just ordering the new Worktunes PELTOR WTD2600, hopefully it will be a good device. Paid around $70.00 shipped. You can get the older version for
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 3, 2009
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      I ended up just ordering the new Worktunes PELTOR WTD2600, hopefully it will be a good device. Paid around $70.00 shipped. You can get the older version for about $20 less, but decided that the extra 4db of protection was worth the price. Hoping it works well with my underpowered audio player.
    • Paul Ramponi
      Let us know how it works.
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 5, 2009
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        Let us know how it works.
      • Greg
        ... Ok. So they arrived today, I still need to test them with a set of safety glasses to see how well they isolate noise, without glasses they do a very good
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 9, 2009
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          --- In X_Series_Mills@yahoogroups.com, Paul Ramponi <pramponi@...> wrote:
          >
          > Let us know how it works.
          >


          Ok. So they arrived today, I still need to test them with a set of safety glasses to see how well they isolate noise, without glasses they do a very good job blocking the noise and seem fairly comfortable. If they suck with a pair of saftey glasses on, I'll update this thread. Now on to what I don't like or think is stupid.

          The audio input is active all the time, if you plug in an external device and then turn on the radio, you can mix the two signals until one of them overrides the other. This is stupid!

          The limiting works with both the radio and external sources, but it is very crude! When you turn the volume up enough, every bit of strong bass like from a drum will get clipped in a very ugly way. Sound horrible. Thankfully since it seems to be completely passive I think it will be easy to bypass.

          There is an inner foam piece that helps prevent echoes inside the ear cavity, this foam is far too big and far too dense over the speaker. This really affects the audio quality. Pulling the foam out and putting it back in seems to have helped improve the audio. I'll have to find some replacement foam so that I can experiment with thinning it around the speaker and making it fit the enclosure a little better.

          Since the speaker to external device is pretty much passive, these do not work worth a damn with my Sony NWZ-E438F audio player. Avoid this player like the plague! It does not have enough drive for really anything except the included piece of junk earbuds. I'm going to send it back to Sony and see what they have to say about the lack of volume, probably a waste of shipping.

          Other than all this the radio has the capability of sounding decent if I can fix the issues with the foam and limiter.
        • Greg
          I ve pretty much decided that the best way to deal with a portable audio player is to get a decent FM transmitter so that I don t have the player attached to
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 11, 2009
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            I've pretty much decided that the best way to deal with a portable audio player is to get a decent FM transmitter so that I don't have the player attached to me. I'll get back with that device when I decide, need to consult with some other places first before I buy something.
          • Greg
            With decent safety glasses these are not all that great and the sound is not so good. With my regular eye glasses they work really well. Guess I need to get a
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 13, 2009
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              With decent safety glasses these are not all that great and the sound is not so good. With my regular eye glasses they work really well. Guess I need to get a set of wire temple safety glasses.

              The good news is that I can no longer here my vacuum running a foot away from me which is exactly what I wanted. Down side is that I can not hear what the mills are doing on the metal. And the other downside is that I probably can't hear the fire alarm now, may have to see about getting a xenon flasher installed in my shop at work.

              Probably going to get the C. Crane Fm transmitter as most reviews say it is great.
            • Greg
              I bought the C.Crane FM transmitter and it sounds pretty good. My big problem now is that if your music is at all dynamic, the audio limiter circuit will crush
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 22, 2009
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                I bought the C.Crane FM transmitter and it sounds pretty good. My big problem now is that if your music is at all dynamic, the audio limiter circuit will crush the quality. Every time a bass drum hits the amplifiers clip and distort or you need to run it at a very low volume to compensate for the more dynamic bits. I'm looking into audio processors to deal with this.

                That said the power output of the C Crane transmitter is extremely low! Thankfully others have gone before me and told me what to do. The case is held together with 3 screws (marked with arrows). Pull the case apart and you will see the one and only potentiometer. Turn that one way and see if you get more static on your receiver, if you do turn it the other way. Mine is turned all the way to the more signal side and it still barely covers 50 feet and does not get outside of the building I am in so it should still be legal. Another note is that most of your Europeans can run up to 1 watt of output power on an FM stereo transmitter, this will cover entire towns. Not sure what regulations you must follow, but you should have no problem covering a very large shop with that much available. In the USA we are limited to less than 1 milliwatt (250 microvolts measured at 3 meters to be exact), the FCC expects you should be able to get 200 feet but not really any farther.

                Now if you have a strong enough signal from just about any regular radio station, these hearing protectors sound pretty good with a decent level. Most any real FM station will have a lot of compression on the audio so that nothing ever gets above a certain point. This works in the favor of these headphones.

                I'm still trying to sort out the safety glasses issue and have another pair on order to see if they are better. I think the big thing is that most safety glasses are made for people with a wider head than mine. This make the temple stick out too far and push the earcushions out away from my head and let in far too much noise. My regular eye glasses have a better fit and just a thin wire running back to my ears and the sound isolation is extremely good with these glasses. I may have to go out and get some prescription safety glasses so that I have a better selection of frames and can bring these hear protectors with me to try them out.

                Over all, once I get all the bugs worked out, I'll be very pleased with the digital work tunes protectors. I'm glad the suggestion was made to try them. I bought them from a safety products retailer who also has an ebay store, they were about half regular price on ebay (about $70 after shipping). The 26db rating really blocks almost everything from the load vacuum right next to me so cutting on the mill is much more enjoyable now. Note that the Yellow ones are the older model and have a lower rating of 22db, every 3db is half (or double depending on which way you go) louder, so that 4db is a lot of noise blocked.
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