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Re: [XSL-FO] difference in times

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  • Danelaw
    is the first time it uses a xslt how can time be reduced? using another parser? many thx for the response ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 1, 2005
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      is the first time it uses a xslt
      how can time be reduced? using another parser?


      many thx for the response
      On 12/1/05, J.Pietschmann <j3322ptm@...> wrote:
      >
      > Danelaw wrote:
      > > principally the first times, why the first time it uses one xml and
      > xslt is
      > > more slow than others?
      >
      > It depends what you mean by "first time".
      > First run after JVM startup -> the usual JVM warmup time.
      > First time using a new XSLT -> maybe reading and compiling the style
      > sheet, although this should be insignificant for most style sheets
      > and XSLT processors in practical use.
      > There are half a zillion more possible reasons, down to the OS file
      > cache and swapping out other applications.
      >
      > J.Pietschmann
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • J.Pietschmann
      ... Parser??? Unless your style sheet approaches the size of 1MB the parser should be really irrelevant. What XSLT processor are you using? How
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2005
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        Danelaw wrote:
        > is the first time it uses a xslt
        > how can time be reduced? using another parser?

        Parser??? Unless your style sheet approaches the size of 1MB the
        parser should be really irrelevant. What XSLT processor are you
        using? How large/complicated is the style sheet? Do you use
        xsl:include/xsl:import on a large scale? Are you sure you don't
        confuse this with the JVM warmup/class loading time?
      • Danelaw
        it is not the warm time of the jvm because if i use another xslt after the first time the times are more or less the same gen.transformar(msg1,xslt1);
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 2, 2005
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          it is not the warm time of the jvm because if i use another xslt after the
          first time the times are more or less the same
          gen.transformar(msg1,xslt1);
          gen.transformar(msg1,xslt1);
          gen.transformar(msg1,xslt1);
          gen.transformar(msg2,xslt2);
          gen.transformar(msg2,xslt2);
          gen.transformar(msg2,xslt2);
          the times are
          6852
          1856
          1571

          6923
          2152
          1999

          and these are more one of the xsl


          On 12/2/05, J.Pietschmann <j3322ptm@...> wrote:
          >
          > Danelaw wrote:
          > > is the first time it uses a xslt
          > > how can time be reduced? using another parser?
          >
          > Parser??? Unless your style sheet approaches the size of 1MB the
          > parser should be really irrelevant. What XSLT processor are you
          > using? How large/complicated is the style sheet? Do you use
          > xsl:include/xsl:import on a large scale? Are you sure you don't
          > confuse this with the JVM warmup/class loading time?
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • J.Pietschmann
          ... Given that you don t even cache the XSLT Templates object, I d say the difference is probably loading new classes and perhaps other low level caching
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 3, 2005
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            Danelaw wrote:
            > it is not the warm time of the jvm because if i use another xslt after the
            > first time the times are more or less the same
            > gen.transformar(msg1,xslt1);
            > gen.transformar(msg1,xslt1);
            > gen.transformar(msg1,xslt1);
            > gen.transformar(msg2,xslt2);
            > gen.transformar(msg2,xslt2);
            > gen.transformar(msg2,xslt2);
            > the times are
            > 6852
            > 1856
            > 1571
            >
            > 6923
            > 2152
            > 1999
            >
            > and these are more one of the xsl


            Given that you don't even cache the XSLT Templates object, I'd
            say the difference is probably loading new classes and perhaps
            other low level caching effects. I don't think there is much you
            can do about this, except perhaps doing a detailed profiling (using
            a real Java profiler).
            And you *should* try to write less confusing code.

            J.Pietschmann
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