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Eckankar listed among other New Age Frauds

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  • tygerpurr
    Ahh, so many mysterious masters from remote mountain ranges. : )) All of them holding in common the same Con tricks. Interesting quote from an article and a
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 8, 2008
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      Ahh, so many mysterious masters from remote mountain ranges. : )) All
      of them holding in common the same Con tricks. Interesting quote from
      an article and a book review.

      ; )

      http://csicop.org/si/9607/lenz.html

      There has been a spate of books geared for the spirituality seeker
      carried in recent decades by publishing houses hoping to tap the
      expanding New Age/metaphysical market. Lenz's book mimics many others
      that use literary devices such as a mysterious spiritual master from a
      mysterious and ancient spiritual order. The remote Himalayan cultures
      and exotic Tibetan teachers have been foils for many authors. Often
      these authors gain a cult following gullible enough to believe that
      the writer actually experienced what he wrote about. For instance,
      there have been hundreds of thousands of people who believed that the
      books by T. Lobsang Rampa -- the first was The Third Eye in 1956 --
      were true stories by a Tibetan monk who gained psychic powers. In
      reality, T. Lobsang Rampa never existed. The books were written by
      Cyril Henry Hoskin, the son of a British plumber. He had never visited
      the Orient.

      Lenz's spiritual adventure comes closer in type to another man's, who
      also posed as a student of a mysterious Tibetan master. Paul Twitchell
      published The Tiger's Fang in 1967 about his magical adventures with
      Eckankar Master Rebazar Tarzs. Tarzs, according to the book, has been
      around nigh 500 years and is a member of the ancient Vairagi Order of
      Soul Travelers. In reality, Twitchell based his Tarzs character
      partially on Kirpal Singh, a guru from a fringe Sikh organization, the
      Radhasoami Satsang, with whom Twitchell had studied. Twitchell was
      known to have plagiarized heavily in writing his "autobiography." The
      new religion of Eckankar is based on Twitchell's revelations, which
      curiously blend Theosophy with the Radhasoami tradition of India and
      Scientology. Twitchell had been a member of the latter group as well.
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