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Creatures Humongous and diminutive.....

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  • Elizabeth Anne Ensley
    Writing is a strange animal. Writer s block, even more so than writing itself. I m finding myself blocked, perhaps because I ve done too much in the way of
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 19, 2004
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      Writing is a strange animal. Writer's block, even more so than
      writing itself.

      I'm finding myself blocked, perhaps because I've done too much in
      the way of plotting and outline before writing anything of
      substance. I have a lot written on later books and I'll return to
      them at a later point (it's a series, and I want to make sure that
      my starting point is the right one. I feel that it is, but I've made
      a few false starts). I've outlined the events at last, using my
      character's inputs, which is all well and good--but without the
      opener, it's just so much hash. In a very real sense, though, this
      first book is the glue that will bind them all together, as will the
      nebulous last book in the series.

      Has anyone else found themselves in a similar situation? I think the
      problem not only would apply to a series, but also to any given
      individual book. Thanks in advance for any discussion or input on
      this topic.



      Regards,
      Liz.
    • David Lettvin
      ... Liz: This may sound simplistic, but it works. Pick a place at random and start writing. Don t start at the begining. Beginnings are like word processors,
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 19, 2004
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        --- In Writers_Library@yahoogroups.com, "Elizabeth Anne Ensley"
        <elizabethanneensley@y...> wrote:
        > I want to make sure that my starting point is the right one.
        ... and
        > I've outlined the events at last, using my character's inputs,
        > which is all well and good--but without the opener, it's just so
        > much hash.

        Liz:
        This may sound simplistic, but it works.

        Pick a place at random and start writing. Don't start at the
        begining. Beginnings are like word processors, there is too much
        potential for fiddling around to try to perfect them.

        In the novel that I'm currently finishing I wrote (in order) chapter
        16, 17, 2, 3, 5, 6, 26, 1, 30, 1 (again), 4, 7, and so on.

        Write the pieces for which you have the clearest vision and let them
        inform you of your beginning.

        When I used to write in strict sequence, I would invariably bog down
        in the first chapter and never get to the rest of the book. I must
        have 30+/- failed beginnings sitting in my files.

        Another trick that works for me is that I write dialog first. It's
        almost like writing a play. Then I go back and start to fill in the
        descriptive passages, occasionally replacing dialog with action. As I
        said, it works for me but YMMV.

        --Doc
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