Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

NEW DEAL 2009 - a plan to rebuild American transportation

Expand Messages
  • andy@newurbanism.org
    From: andy@newurbanism.org UrbanDesign.org has put together what we call NEW DEAL 2009 - a plan to rebuild American transportation to create millions of jobs
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 12, 2008
    • 0 Attachment

      From: andy@...

      UrbanDesign.org has put together what we call NEW DEAL 2009 - a plan to rebuild American transportation to create millions of jobs and stimulate our economy while solving our mobility crisis, climate change, and peak oil.  Our plan includes the retooling of large companies in the transportation business including GM. 

       

      The plan is for a world-class national rail system to cover America.  It is a 3-tiered plan including a national high speed rail network, regional metros and commuter trains, and local light rail, trolley and trams.  Together these rail systems would greatly reduce our need for cars, and in turn reduce our oil addiction.

       

      Here is our plan:  http://www.UrbanDesign.org/newdeal2009.html

      ============================================================================

       

      We are a small group of urban designers who operate several websites to promote sustainability, urbanism, and green transportation. 

       

      Regards,

      Andy Kunz

      http://www.UrbanDesign.org

       

       

       

       

       

    • Richard Layman
      I think this is great except for two things (and I will still blog about it).   1.  You lay out three levels of transit -- national, regional, and local. 
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 12, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I think this is great except for two things (and I will still blog about it).
         
        1.  You lay out three levels of transit -- national, regional, and local.  There are (at least) four levels.  What you call regional is more "metropolitan" or subregional.   At least I don't think of the WMATA subway system (the image you used in your presentation) as a full regional rail system.  It's a part of a regional transportation system, but incomplete.  A regional railroad system in our area should provide service to Virginia Beach on the south (VA) to Wilmington (DE) and Harrisburg (PA) on the north, and throughout VA and WV on the west, and throughout southern and eastern Maryland.  That's a much much much greater span than the WMATA subway lines.
         
        National high speed railroads and regional higher speed and lower speed railroads are equally deserving of being considered separately and simultaneously with metropolitan transit networks.  (Sadly, even though I've sent my writings on "transit network" conceptualization to e-lists you're on, I guess it hasn't percolated.)
         
        2.  It's a waste of time to talk about retooling car companies as transit vehicle manufacturers.  Let new companies develop.  Fund them.  Workers at other companies can go apply for jobs there.  The auto companies haven't demonstrated that they are the companies you want to build transit vehicles.  Acknowledge that and move on.
         
        Better that you would have recommended rebuilding the rail systems and vehicle manufacturing infrastructure, building that capacity and skill here, without mucking it up with the auto industries.  There's nothing to prevent GE from restarting their "apparatus" division and I have no problem with govt. assistance to move that forward.  (The assets of the old Budd Company ended up with Bombardier.)
         
        Similarly, I have written that DC, MD, and VA should license, just like Oregon Iron Works did, the ability to manufacture Inekon streetcar vehicles, and set up a plant in the Ivy City Train yard in DC, and build cars for use in our region, which if all the plans were built out, would require 100s of vehicle sets.
        Otherwise, it's a good plan.
         
        Richard Layman
        urbanplacesandspaces.blogspot.com


        --- On Fri, 12/12/08, andy@... <andy@...> wrote:
        From: andy@... <andy@...>
        Subject: WorldTransport Forum NEW DEAL 2009 - a plan to rebuild American transportation
        To: WorldTransport@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, December 12, 2008, 4:23 AM

        From: andy@newurbanism. org

        UrbanDesign. org has put together what we call NEW DEAL 2009 - a plan to rebuild American transportation to create millions of jobs and stimulate our economy while solving our mobility crisis, climate change, and peak oil.  Our plan includes the retooling of large companies in the transportation business including GM. 

         

        The plan is for a world-class national rail system to cover America.  It is a 3-tiered plan including a national high speed rail network, regional metros and commuter trains, and local light rail, trolley and trams.  Together these rail systems would greatly reduce our need for cars, and in turn reduce our oil addiction.

         

        Here is our plan:  http://www.UrbanDes ign.org/newdeal2 009.html

        ============ ========= ========= ========= ========= ========= ========= ========= =

         

        We are a small group of urban designers who operate several websites to promote sustainability, urbanism, and green transportation. 

         

        Regards,

        Andy Kunz

        http://www.UrbanDes ign.org

         

         

         

         

         

      • Lee Schipper
        Are there not two big choices here 1. Build and rebuild in the same expansive mode, which means don t charge users short range marginal costs (capacity) or
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 12, 2008
        • 0 Attachment

          Are there not two big choices here
          1. Build and rebuild in the same expansive mode, which means don't charge users short range marginal costs (capacity) or long rante marginal costs (more expansive building)
          2.  Build in the sustainable mode, so that we face short term marginal costs with peak load pricing of roads AND transit, AND parking, we pay carbon and oil security taxes, etc.
           
          #2 means the amounts of $ to build are far less than #1. My fear is that in the name of jobs we'll just opt for #1 again and again, and, well its like that Disney Comic cover from the 1950s: Goofy is in a Marching Band and he cons pluto into carrying his bass drum. Goofy ties a fishing pole to the drum and hangs a hot dog on it in front of Pluto's eyes, and pluto just keeps marching forward.
          Isn't that our transport, our energy, our water, our health car, our housing (americans deduct all interest from their home mortgages), and even our banking system? Economic unsustainable.
           
          Wait, that's most of the US economy
           
          lee
           
           
          I think this is great except for two things (and I will still blog about it).
           
          1.  You lay out three levels of transit -- national, regional, and local.  There are (at least) four levels.  What you call regional is more "metropolitan" or subregional.   At least I don't think of the WMATA subway system (the image you used in your presentation) as a full regional rail system.  It's a part of a regional transportation system, but incomplete.  A regional railroad system in our area should provide service to Virginia Beach on the south (VA) to Wilmington (DE) and Harrisburg (PA) on the north, and throughout VA and WV on the west, and throughout southern and eastern Maryland.  That's a much much much greater span than the WMATA subway lines.
           
          National high speed railroads and regional higher speed and lower speed railroads are equally deserving of being considered separately and simultaneously with metropolitan transit networks.  (Sadly, even though I've sent my writings on "transit network" conceptualization to e-lists you're on, I guess it hasn't percolated.)
           
          2.  It's a waste of time to talk about retooling car companies as transit vehicle manufacturers.  Let new companies develop.  Fund them.  Workers at other companies can go apply for jobs there.  The auto companies haven't demonstrated that they are the companies you want to build transit vehicles.  Acknowledge that and move on.
           
          Better that you would have recommended rebuilding the rail systems and vehicle manufacturing infrastructure, building that capacity and skill here, without mucking it up with the auto industries.  There's nothing to prevent GE from restarting their "apparatus" division and I have no problem with govt. assistance to move that forward.  (The assets of the old Budd Company ended up with Bombardier.)
           
          Similarly, I have written that DC, MD, and VA should license, just like Oregon Iron Works did, the ability to manufacture Inekon streetcar vehicles, and set up a plant in the Ivy City Train yard in DC, and build cars for use in our region, which if all the plans were built out, would require 100s of vehicle sets.
          Otherwise, it's a good plan.
           
          Richard Layman
          urbanplacesandspace s.blogspot. com


          --- On Fri, 12/12/08, andy@newurbanism. org <andy@newurbanism. org> wrote:
          From: andy@newurbanism. org <andy@newurbanism. org>
          Subject: WorldTransport Forum NEW DEAL 2009 - a plan to rebuild American transportation
          To: WorldTransport@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Friday, December 12, 2008, 4:23 AM

          From: andy@newurbanism. org

          UrbanDesign. org has put together what we call NEW DEAL 2009 - a plan to rebuild American transportation to create millions of jobs and stimulate our economy while solving our mobility crisis, climate change, and peak oil.  Our plan includes the retooling of large companies in the transportation business including GM. 

           

          The plan is for a world-class national rail system to cover America.  It is a 3-tiered plan including a national high speed rail network, regional metros and commuter trains, and local light rail, trolley and trams.  Together these rail systems would greatly reduce our need for cars, and in turn reduce our oil addiction.

          Here is our plan:  http://www.UrbanDes ign.org/newdeal2 009.html

          ============ ========= ========= ========= ========= ========= ========= ========= =

          We are a small group of urban designers who operate several websites to promote sustainability, urbanism, and green transportation. 

          Regards,

          Andy Kunz

          http://www.UrbanDes ign.org

           

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.