Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Nudging People to Make Better Choices: Transport Applications

Expand Messages
  • Eric Britton
    This to my mind is my mind one of the very important tool sets for creating a New Mobility Agenda that works. We hope that Erel will be sharing with us the key
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 1, 2008
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment

      This to my mind is my mind one of the very important tool sets for creating a New Mobility Agenda that works. We hope that Erel will be sharing with us the key papers and results of this session.  

       

       

      Transport Studies Unit Open Seminar

      Wednesday 10 December 2008 - 3pm, Boardroom, OUCE, Dyson Perrins Building, South Parks Road, Oxford

      Nudging People to Make Better Choices: Transport Applications

      Dr Erel Avineri, Reader in Travel Behaviour, Centre for Transport & Society, University of the West of England, Bristol.

       

      Abstract

      Travel behaviour has been an area of great interest to practitioners and researchers ever since forecasting user choice was identified as crucial in the planning and management of transport systems. Travel behaviour arising from the choices of individuals is perhaps the most significant determinant of performance of transport systems and effectiveness of transport schemes. Realising that individuals' travel behaviour and choices do not necessarily lead to economic, social and environmental wellbeing, governments all over the world have been taking measures to change travel behaviour for the benefit of society - usually by regulating the transport market, reform pricing to improve efficiency, or (more recently) changing attitudes towards transport alternatives.

      Much of the behavioural theories in transport context are based on the assumption the individual traveller is a 'homo economicus', a rational economic human beings who, through choice-making, maximise her utilities. On the other hand, recent empirical studies provide much evidence that in real life the behaviour of travellers is typified by bounded rationality ('homo psychologicus'). It has been argued that travellers' limited cognitive resources have a strong effect on their travel-choice behaviour.

      Inspired by the works of cognitive psychologists (such as Tversky & Kahneman) and behavioural economists (such as Thaler & Sunstein) Dr Avineri and his colleagues tested some of the paradigms in travel behaviour and developed alternative models of travel-choice behaviour that can incorporate awkward but important aspects of travel behaviour. It was found that while travellers' choices can not be anticipated in a standard economic framework, they can be explained and predicted by cognitive psychology models. Moreover, it opens the opportunity to change travellers' behaviour towards better alternatives - in a way that does not limit their freedom of choice (or, as it is fashionable to say, people are 'nudge-able'). The seminar will provide theoretical background, empirical findings and potential applications in areas such as demand management, travel information systems, travel plans and traffic calming.

       

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.