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'Naked streets' and safe chaos

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  • On Behalf Of Paul Barter
    This is a follow-up to an old sustran-discuss thread that began in April (as [sustran] FW: Traffic in India) when I posted a link to a video of a chaotic
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 3, 2006
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      This is a follow-up to an old sustran-discuss thread that began in April
      (as [sustran] FW: Traffic in India) when I posted a link to a video of a
      chaotic looking Indian intersection. It provoked debate on the merits of
      traffic discipline versus chaos and later moved on to some other related
      issues. All of this resonates with debates about shared space or naked
      streets approaches to streets and the public realm.

      Then I noticed the proliferation of what you might call 'traffic
      exotica' video clips on the GlobalSouth Mobility group at YouTube -
      http://www.youtube.com/group/globalsouth. This got me
      thinking about this issue again - and if or how shared space idea might
      apply to lower income cities.

      So I decided to blog about it - with more questions than answers I must
      admit. See
      http://urbantransportasia.blogspot.com/2006/08/naked-streets-and-safe-ch
      aos.html

      The entry is called: 'Naked streets' and safe chaos

      And it begins:
      "I recommend taking a look at YouTube's GlobalSouth group which has more
      than 60 short videos now on transport in developing countries. A
      striking number of the videos are simply footage of streets or
      intersections in countries like India, China or Vietnam. Most of them
      show traffic that at first glance looks completely and utterly CRAZY,
      often with a mind-boggling diversity of road users doing anything and
      everything you could imagine."

      Feedback welcome. I am sure some of you may know a lot more about this
      than I do.

      Paul
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