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Re: [WorldTransport Forum] environment award

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  • Tramsol@aol.com
    ... charge is the rigorous management of the space resource. 1) apply the UK statute that roads are provided SOLELY for the passing and repassing of traffic -
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 2, 2004
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      In a message dated 02/04/04 20:20:21 GMT Daylight Time, ktsou@... writes:

      I think that bus and bicycle lanes is a much better (and easier) solution.
      If the goal is to move people from private cars to public transit (in an
      egalitarian way - not just prohibiting through monetary charges to the less
      privileged to drive), then the difference of the required time between the
      two modes is important, not only the absolute time spent for the trip. And
      obviously roads could be crossed with more safety when they are congested,
      since the speed of cars is lower. Car needs are quite different from
      pedestrian or bicyclists needs (and in most cases conflicting).

      One method of control, which is perhaps more equitable than a congestion charge is the rigorous management of the space resource.

      1) apply the UK statute that roads are provided SOLELY for the passing and repassing of traffic - in its widest sense, embracing pedestrians, cyclists, and all powered vehicles.  Use of roads for any other purpose will not be tolerated, save for the grace and favour arrangement of allowing a vehicle to stop momentarily to take on or offload goods or passengers.

      2) with this pretext the provision of space to park a vehicle becomes a marketable resource, but equally one which can be rationed by land use regulation - and plain commonsense.

      3) It has been well demonstrated by the Commonwealth Games in Manchester, and various projects to enhance cycle parking at rail stations thet the traffic volume can be significantly affected by the amount of parking available.  Indeed structured parking charges (penalising arrivals at certain times of day, or racking up the rate for long stay parking - famously £440.00 for 24 hours on Glasgow Central and Edinburgh Waverley Stations, but free (at the same locations) for the first 20 minutes).

      Thus access to all activities is equitably given to any person walking in the door, but the issue then becomes the detail of what they do with their mode of transport.  Pedestrians have the edge here, and cyclists can park their vehicles in very small spaces, for which many accept they may need to pay, bus, train, and taxi users enjoy the fact that their vehicle is taken away by a driver, and indeed car users can have the same facility, at a price, either of a driver, or a paid for space within walking distance.

      Of course making roads solely for moving traffic greatly simplifies the issue over parking restrictions with signs and painted lines - if its a road then there is no parking - period....Hoare-Beleisha worked that one out... where did we start to go wrong?

      Dave Holladay
      Glasgow

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