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"Travel-Time Budget" for Twitter et al

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  • eric britton
    Remember Yacov Zahavi of the World Bank and famous his Travel-Time Budget ? In a nutshell it read like this: The research showed that… a) most of the world
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 24, 2012
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      Remember Yacov Zahavi of the World Bank and famous his "Travel-Time Budget"? In a nutshell it read like this: The research showed that…

      a) most of the world spends about an hour a day in travel
      b) most commutes are under half an hour, and
      c) Families spend about 12-15% of their disposable income for mobility.

      What's the point in our present discussion context?  Well, it's a question really.

       

      As we talk about time spent/misspent with things that on the surface are supposed (at least in part) to be useful -- such as Twitter, Facebook, et al -- do we in fact have, individually and as groups, our own Time Budget for these kinds of "information commuting" activities.

       

      From a personal point of view I may be protected because I put a high value (?!) on my personal time, to which I can add a pretty low threshold for wasting my time.  So I think personally I am OK.  Thus far.

       

      But back to Zahavi, which is far more interesting than my personal case: There must be analysts who are working with this, and it would be interesting to know a bit more about them.  It can be argued that the social media are themselves a form of mobility.

       

      In the meantime I muddle on and post this reflection to Facebook, Twitter and one or two other hopefully somewhat efficient places..

       

      Eric Britton

          

      P Avant d'imprimer, pensez à l'environnement

       

    • Dave Holladay
      You might also consider some figures I ve noted lately At fringe meeting Stephen Joseph mentioned that the average private car in the UK sits idle for over 90%
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 24, 2012
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        You might also consider some figures I've noted lately

        At fringe meeting Stephen Joseph mentioned that the average private car in the UK sits idle for over 90% of the time (94 or 96% IIRC)

        Worryingly the UK in Europe is the market for over 30% of new car sales - to 12% of the total population.

        Moving out of car ownership to sensible P-A-Y-G car use will generally boost a household's disposable income by around 20% (for very low wage households the running costs of a car can eat up nearly 60% of their income).  That is a 20% boost to spending power with huge potential that is will be spent locally with local businesses, achieve by better use of resources - and no recourse to such false salvation as quantitative easing (AKA printing money).  No need to give the workforce a pay rise, and no penalty of the increased income tax burden that would bring on the workers - effectively money currently being wasted on idle assets is unlocked.  Maybe someone should tell 'Gideon' and his fellow finance ministers, about the whizzo idea.

        The Belgian scheme of giving free bus travel when a car owner scraps their vehicle, is in effect a far better use of £1000 than simply a 'bung' to the individual to go and buy a new car and carry on with the same flawed regime.  The UK even gets it wrong with electric cars and hybrids - rather than try and get individuals purchasing cars with a greater need for planned servicing and proper recycling, and with a cost that demands high utilisation, they should be putting more electric cars out in car share fleets.

        I'll close with a new vignette of another fellow passenger on the train, who considers the extra £900/year he is paying for the first class season ticket a good value treat, having sold the car he used to drive with and made savings of over £2000/year, by switching to cycling and train use to get to work.  Even that £900 cost is mitigated by the fact he gets a free coffee and snack on each trip, and free wifi when travelling and 250 days (typical annual commuting total) of £1.20 x 2 coffees makes a good value recovery on that extra cost.  This of course excludes the 'gym' outlays no longer needed.

        Dave

        On 24/10/12 12:15, eric britton wrote:

        Remember Yacov Zahavi of the World Bank and famous his "Travel-Time Budget"? In a nutshell it read like this: The research showed that…

        a) most of the world spends about an hour a day in travel
        b) most commutes are under half an hour, and
        c) Families spend about 12-15% of their disposable income for mobility.

        What's the point in our present discussion context?  Well, it's a question really.

         

        As we talk about time spent/misspent with things that on the surface are supposed (at least in part) to be useful -- such as Twitter, Facebook, et al -- do we in fact have, individually and as groups, our own Time Budget for these kinds of "information commuting" activities.

         

        From a personal point of view I may be protected because I put a high value (?!) on my personal time, to which I can add a pretty low threshold for wasting my time.  So I think personally I am OK.  Thus far.

         

        But back to Zahavi, which is far more interesting than my personal case: There must be analysts who are working with this, and it would be interesting to know a bit more about them.  It can be argued that the social media are themselves a form of mobility.

         

        In the meantime I muddle on and post this reflection to Facebook, Twitter and one or two other hopefully somewhat efficient places..

         

        Eric Britton

            

        P Avant d'imprimer, pensez à l'environnement

         


      • Richard Layman
        you mention social media as a form of mobility.  I can t claim to have read all the great work that s out there on agglomeration economies and
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 24, 2012
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          you mention social media as a form of mobility.  I can't claim to have read all the great work that's out there on agglomeration economies and transportation.  HOWEVER, David Engwicht's _Reclaiming Our Cities and Towns: Better Living Through Less Traffic_, has an incredibly great discussion and a diagram on how cities were created to facilitate (all forms of) exchange, and the impact of devoting space to auto traffic at the expense of other modes reduces the spaces made available to facilitate exchange.

          Social media is another form of exchange.  It facilitates interaction.  But like induced demand with adding roadway lanes, social media induces "time demand".  In the US, it is argued that part of the decline in car purchasing is because of the increased use of social media within younger demographics.

          Richard Layman



          From: eric britton <eric.britton@...>
          To: worldtransport@yahoogroups.com; NewMobilityCafe@yahoogroups.com; 'Global 'South' Sustainable Transport' <sustran-discuss@...>
          Sent: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 7:15 AM
          Subject: [NewMobilityCafe] "Travel-Time Budget" for Twitter et al

           

          Remember Yacov Zahavi of the World Bank and famous his "Travel-Time Budget"? In a nutshell it read like this: The research showed that…

          a) most of the world spends about an hour a day in travel
          b) most commutes are under half an hour, and
          c) Families spend about 12-15% of their disposable income for mobility.

          What's the point in our present discussion context?  Well, it's a question really.
           
          As we talk about time spent/misspent with things that on the surface are supposed (at least in part) to be useful -- such as Twitter, Facebook, et al -- do we in fact have, individually and as groups, our own Time Budget for these kinds of "information commuting" activities.
           
          From a personal point of view I may be protected because I put a high value (?!) on my personal time, to which I can add a pretty low threshold for wasting my time.  So I think personally I am OK.  Thus far.
           
          But back to Zahavi, which is far more interesting than my personal case: There must be analysts who are working with this, and it would be interesting to know a bit more about them.  It can be argued that the social media are themselves a form of mobility.
           
          In the meantime I muddle on and post this reflection to Facebook, Twitter and one or two other hopefully somewhat efficient places..
           
          Eric Britton
              
          P Avant d'imprimer, pensez à l'environnement
           


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