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RE: WorldTransport Forum capacities for different modes of transport

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  • Douglas Economics
    Please note flat earthlings, that the most used form of mechanized transport in the City is the vertical lift. Ask yourself how many times did you go up and
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 20, 2009
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      Please note flat earthlings, that the most used form of mechanized transport in the City is the vertical lift. Ask  yourself how many times did you go up and down in a lift today?  Ten brownie points if you chose to walk up  or down some stairs instead.

       

      The ‘dense’ city has a vertical transport ‘cost’ which is oft forgotten that offsets the horizontal benefits flat earthlings are obsessed about.

       

      Neil Douglas

       

      From: WorldTransport@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WorldTransport@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Simon Norton
      Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2009 7:55 AM
      To: worldtransport@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: WorldTransport Forum capacities for different modes of transport

       

       

      When considering the capacity of a certain area of land for different modes of
      transport, there are a couple of factors that have to be equalised between modes
      (car on street, car on highway, conventional bus, BRT, light rail, heavy rail
      and bike).

      1. Is it required that people should be able to get on and off the system at
      almost any point ? (Roughly speaking, yes for conventional bus, light rail and
      bike; this objective is sought by traffic planners for cars on streets but often
      not achieved.)

      2. Do people need to cross the route, especially on foot ? (Roughly speaking,
      no for car on highway or heavy rail, though especially in the former case people
      often do need to cross the route but are unable to do so. For the other modes
      adequate provision for crossing pedestrians may reduce capacity, especially for
      car on street and bike. Do places exist where buses are so frequent that
      crossing the street is a problem ?

      Simon Norton

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