Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: TRANSPORT: De-regulation

Expand Messages
  • p.withrington
    Rail Privatisation led to an increase of 30% in passenger-km over 6 years. As to deaths - although there have been a spate of train accidents the deaths to
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 2, 2002
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Rail Privatisation led to an increase of 30% in passenger-km over 6 years.  As to deaths - although there have been a spate of "train accidents" the deaths to rail passengers as a whole are now less per year than before privatisation largely due to the elimination of slam doors.  Additionally over the 25 years prior to privatisation fares rose in real terms by 1% compound per year providing an increase for the period of 28% in real terms. 
       
      Why do people believe that a nationalised rail industry would perform any better.  After all it is the Nationalised industry which pretended at privatisation that track maintenance would now be only £0.9 bn per year only to find it is actually £3 bn per year.
       
      The only way to hold rail fares down is to subsidise from the tax payer but why should the tax payer do that when passenger rail  uses 2 to 3 times the fuel of competing express buses and imposes casualty costs 3 times higher and when only 1.5% of all journeys go by rail?
       
      If you would like copy of a paper with the title Railways Myth and Maths which sets all that out, and which is now becoming influential, please request details.
       
      Meanwhile have we any but anecdotal evidence that bus services are (a) worse than they were or (b) worse than they would have been if they had not been deregulated?
       
      Regards
       
      Paul Withrington
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 8:40 AM
      Subject: TRANSPORT: De-regulation

      A popular topic whose action is well over due.  In case others are not on this e-group I thought this might help.
       
      Kate
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, June 24, 2002 6:32 AM
      Subject: Re: [WorldTransport] Britainand public Transport deregulation

      Dear Colleagues,
       
      Many thanks to Elaine for this.  I think it emphasises the need for this special issue.  The British experience has produced:
       
      record levels of unreliability and lack of punctuality
      record levels of passenger complaints
      very high rail fares
      a bankrupt and incompetent Railtrack authority
      more rail passengers
      more rail freight
      5 fatal accidents due to poor track, poor signals and poor quality control
      large tax subsidies to private companies (larger than in the days of British Rail)
       
       
       
      Let's see if we can get a special issue together on this.
       
      Any offers of papers, suggestions etc to me, please.
       
       
      very best wishes
       
      John Whitelegg
      Editor
      WTPP
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 10:45 AM
      Subject: [WorldTransport] Britainand public Transport deregulation

      To the group,
       
      I was happy to see the note from Eric about the possiblity of dedicating a whole issue of the WTPP  journal to the overall impacts of the deregulation of Public Transport in Great Britain. I know that I've heard very mixed reports about this experiment, but here in the Middle East, the British experience seems to be regarded by bureaucrats as something that has achieved great success, and the Israeli Ministry Transport, for one, is very keen on following the British model. 
       
      I'm afraid that this may be the case in many developing countries, which have become entranced by the magic wand of the marketplace.
       
      Elaine Fletcher
      Jerusalem 

      The Journal of World Transport Policy & Practice
      For more information: http://ecoplan.org/wtpp
      To post a message to group: wtpp@egroups.com
      To subscribe:  wtpp-subscribe@egroups.com 
      To unsubscribe:  wtpp-unsubscribe@egroups.com 



      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

      The Journal of World Transport Policy & Practice
      For more information: http://ecoplan.org/wtpp
      To post a message to group: wtpp@egroups.com
      To subscribe:  wtpp-subscribe@egroups.com 
      To unsubscribe:  wtpp-unsubscribe@egroups.com 



      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
    • Donald Bain
      ... From: p.withrington [mailto:p.withrington@ntlworld.com] Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 11:57 AM To: kt.freeman Cc: Foe Transport;
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 2, 2002
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: p.withrington [mailto:p.withrington@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 11:57 AM
        To: kt.freeman
        Cc: Foe Transport; worldtransport@yahoogroups.com; ecoplan.ads@...
        Subject: [WorldTransport] Re: TRANSPORT: De-regulation

        Rail Privatisation led to an increase of 30% in passenger-km over 6 years.  As to deaths - although there have been a spate of "train accidents" the deaths to rail passengers as a whole are now less per year than before privatisation largely due to the elimination of slam doors.  Additionally over the 25 years prior to privatisation fares rose in real terms by 1% compound per year providing an increase for the period of 28% in real terms. 
         
        Why do people believe that a nationalised rail industry would perform any better.  After all it is the Nationalised industry which pretended at privatisation that track maintenance would now be only £0.9 bn per year only to find it is actually £3 bn per year.
         
        The only way to hold rail fares down is to subsidise from the tax payer but why should the tax payer do that when passenger rail  uses 2 to 3 times the fuel of competing express buses and imposes casualty costs 3 times higher and when only 1.5% of all journeys go by rail?
         
        If you would like copy of a paper with the title Railways Myth and Maths which sets all that out, and which is now becoming influential, please request details.
         
        Meanwhile have we any but anecdotal evidence that bus services are (a) worse than they were or (b) worse than they would have been if they had not been deregulated?
         
        Regards
         
        Paul Withrington
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 8:40 AM
        Subject: TRANSPORT: De-regulation

        A popular topic whose action is well over due.  In case others are not on this e-group I thought this might help.
         
        Kate
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, June 24, 2002 6:32 AM
        Subject: Re: [WorldTransport] Britainand public Transport deregulation

        Dear Colleagues,
         
        Many thanks to Elaine for this.  I think it emphasises the need for this special issue.  The British experience has produced:
         
        record levels of unreliability and lack of punctuality
        record levels of passenger complaints
        very high rail fares
        a bankrupt and incompetent Railtrack authority
        more rail passengers
        more rail freight
        5 fatal accidents due to poor track, poor signals and poor quality control
        large tax subsidies to private companies (larger than in the days of British Rail)
         
         
         
        Let's see if we can get a special issue together on this.
         
        Any offers of papers, suggestions etc to me, please.
         
         
        very best wishes
         
        John Whitelegg
        Editor
        WTPP
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 10:45 AM
        Subject: [WorldTransport] Britainand public Transport deregulation

        To the group,
         
        I was happy to see the note from Eric about the possiblity of dedicating a whole issue of the WTPP  journal to the overall impacts of the deregulation of Public Transport in Great Britain. I know that I've heard very mixed reports about this experiment, but here in the Middle East, the British experience seems to be regarded by bureaucrats as something that has achieved great success, and the Israeli Ministry Transport, for one, is very keen on following the British model. 
         
        I'm afraid that this may be the case in many developing countries, which have become entranced by the magic wand of the marketplace.
         
        Elaine Fletcher
        Jerusalem 

        The Journal of World Transport Policy & Practice
        For more information: http://ecoplan.org/wtpp
        To post a message to group: wtpp@egroups.com
        To subscribe:  wtpp-subscribe@egroups.com 
        To unsubscribe:  wtpp-unsubscribe@egroups.com 



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

        The Journal of World Transport Policy & Practice
        For more information: http://ecoplan.org/wtpp
        To post a message to group: wtpp@egroups.com
        To subscribe:  wtpp-subscribe@egroups.com 
        To unsubscribe:  wtpp-unsubscribe@egroups.com 



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

        The Journal of World Transport Policy & Practice
        For more information: http://ecoplan.org/wtpp
        To post a message to group: wtpp@egroups.com
        To subscribe:  wtpp-subscribe@egroups.com 
        To unsubscribe:  wtpp-unsubscribe@egroups.com 



        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
      • tonyvickers@cix.co.uk
        Why should the passenger - or the general taxpayer - pay to maintain and upgrade rail fixed assets? It is, after all, the owners of land adjoining rail
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 3, 2002
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          Why should the passenger - or the general taxpayer - pay to maintain and
          upgrade rail fixed assets? It is, after all, the owners of land adjoining
          rail stations who benefit most from the presence of a working railway
          network.

          Passengers should pay for the cost of running trains through their fares.
          Property owners should pay for the rest, through taxes based on property
          values. This happens in many countries already, in various ways. Most
          notable examples: Hong Kong and Brisbane.

          Tony Vickers
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.