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179RE: [WorldTransport] About transport impacts over urban land

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  • Wetzel Dave
    Aug 27, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      What you have identified is not the difference in the cost of a home - but
      the difference in the value of the land on which the home sits.

      Of course you are right, transport is not the only factor to give land its
      value - transport is just one of many influences.

      However, what we do know is that the individual landowner does not create
      land value. It is the community's demand for land in a specific location
      that gives land its value. If Government's collected this location benefit
      as a levy or a tax on site values, they could pay for their services and
      reduce taxes on trade and incomes.

      Let me know if any reader wants more information (appropriate web-sites
      etc.)

      Dave

      Dave Wetzel
      Vice-chair, TfL.
      Windsor House, 42-50 Victoria Street.
      London. SW1H 0TL. UK.
      Tel 020 7941 4200


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Lee Schipper [mailto:SCHIPPER@...]
      Sent: 09 August 2003 19:57
      To: WorldTransport@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [WorldTransport] About transport impacts over urban land


      I think the issue is the other way around: How much does a given size
      home cost in a dense neighborhood, in a sprawling neighborhood, in an
      older development, in a newer development, as a function of the location
      of that neighborhood, its local population density, its jobs to housing
      ratio etc? Then, if good transit service is establish, how much do
      housing costs rise (if at all); conversely, how do housing costs vary as
      a function of distance from a good transit line.
      On a very practical basis, 150 sq meters in Georgetown, Washington DC
      costs about twice to three times what it costs i Cleveland Park (two
      long metro stops away) and four times what it costs in Tenley town. The
      latter two actually have metro stops, Georgetown is 300 to 2000 meters
      from the nearest Metro station (buses in DC are a slow burning
      disaster). Housing close in to the suburb of Bethesda, which has good
      Metro and bus service, costs more than housing farther from the main
      metro stop, but how much more.
      Could it simply be that consumers figured out that the farther out you
      go, the more land and home you get for a unit of investment, and, aided
      by US policies that encourage borrowing for home ownership, make a
      tradeoff of a little more in cheap fuel and insurance in exchange for a
      lot more land? Could it also be that car insurance is cheaper in the
      low-density suburbs than it is in the higher density city core (it is)?

      In the end I think we paid $50K extra to be two blocks from Cleveland
      Park Metro; lots of options 500-2000 meters farther away offerred more
      house for less money. Since I cycle to work those extra 2000 meters,
      which would have been a long uphill grind, would have been a real ordeal
      day after day. But the hill I do have to climb is worth it, since I
      could not afford to live in Georgetown (where I rented) and pay around
      $1mn for a large three bedroom home rather than $780K for a much larger
      5bdr home (yes, with the study etc all the home is filled up already). I
      could have lived i the farther burbs for half as much, had a larger lot,
      driven or taken public transport 45 minutes each way, paid to go to a
      gym rather than cycled.. You all get my drift.

      That may be the trade off. Why do the various reports on sprawl in the
      US focus only on transport costs and fuel, but consistently omit all the
      other characteristics AND COSTS of residential location? Life is more
      than one-dimensional, is it not?

      >>> john.holtzclaw@... 08/01/03 05:08PM >>>

      Hi Javier,

      We have information on that in the U.S. on our website,
      http://www.SierraClub.org/sprawl
      Go to Transportation; then Articles and Research; then Smart Growth --
      As
      Seen From the Air
      or How Compact Neighborhoods Affect Modal Choice







      John Holtzclaw
      415-977-5534
      John.Holtzclaw@...
      sprawl and transportation action -- http://www.SierraClub.org/sprawl
      This View of Density -- www.sflcv.org/density


      "Javier Pacheco Raguz" <jpraguz@...>

      06/12/2003 01:33 AM



      Hello everybody, I am glad to meet you all. I would like to make a
      request for information about the impacts of transportation (with
      special focus on mass transit systems) over urban land in terms of
      value, density, pollution, etc. I am doing research about it and I
      will be thankful if somebody can provide me some tips about related
      literature. Thanks in advance for your kind help.

      Javier Pacheco
      ITC UPLA.2 Student
      Enschede, The Netherland




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