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Salt Lake Tribune article on Valentine's Day cites Rev. and Mrs. Moon

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  • Damian J. Anderson
    http://www.sltrib.com/faith/ci_14382241 Couples in love, couples in faith Compiled By Peggy Fletcher Stack
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 13, 2010

      http://www.sltrib.com/faith/ci_14382241





      Couples in love, couples in faith

      Updated: 02/11/2010 04:38:51 PM MST

      Related

      Adam & Eve

      Eve's diary » My first sorrow. Yesterday he avoided me and seemed to wish I would not talk to him. I could not believe it, and thought there was some mistake, for I loved to be with him, and loved to hear him talk, and so how could it be that he could feel unkind toward me when I had not done anything?

      Adam's diary » The new creature says its name is Eve. That is all right, I have no objections. ... It says it is not an It, it is a She. ... I find she is a good deal of a companion. I see I should be lonesome and depressed without her, now that I have lost my property. Another thing, she says it is ordered that we work for our living hereafter. She will be useful. I will superintend. ... Wherever she was, there was Eden.

      Source: The Diaries of Adam and Eve: Translated by Mark Twain; classiclit.about.com

       Joseph & Mary

      Joseph was a carpenter and there was lots of work in the area, but he and Mary had no place to live and Mary was pregnant. She told Joseph that he would be the child's father, but he wasn't the child's father. The spark that began the life of their child, she said, came from -- well, it was too embarrassing for Joseph to repeat. It sounded impossible and ridiculous. Friends told him he was being taken for a fool, but Joseph loved Mary. He knew that the last few months had been hard for her. Joseph decided that whatever fantastic stories

      Mary told him, he would love the child as his own.

      Source: From a "A Modern Day Mary and Joseph" by Scott Simon, National Public Radio, December 2005 

      Nikos Kazantzakis & Helen Samiou

      Nikos Kazantzakis, the foremost figure in modern Greek literature whose work is marked by his search for God and immortality, fell in love with Helen Samiou, a young Greek journalist, in the summer of 1924. In April 1928, Samiou joined the future author of The Last Temptation of Christ and Zorba the Greek on a tour of the Soviet Union and they never separated again. She became his collaborator, muse and, in 1944, his second wife.

      Source: www.bookrags.com/biography/nikos-kazantzakis/

      Nefertiti & Amenhotep IV

      When Nefertiti was 15, she married the Egyptian king Amenhotep IV, who was a year older and became king upon his father's death. They had six daughters and, according to some, one son. During the first five years of Amenhotep's reign, Nefertiti enjoyed a high profile. Evidence of her political importance is seen in the large number of carved scenes in which she is ... shown taking part in the daily worship and making offerings similar to those of the king -- acts quite unlike those usually performed by previous chief queens, all of whom had a secondary role.

      In the fifth year of his reign, Amenhotep changed his name to Akhenaten. He went against the beliefs of previous kings by announcing that the sun god Aten was the greatest of all Egyptian gods and the only one who should be worshipped, rather than Amen-Ra, who long had been considered supreme. Nefertiti shared his belief. ... After the 14th year of Akhenaten's rule, there are no more pictures of Nefertiti; she simply disappears from view.

      www.notablebiographies.com/Mo-Ni/Nefertiti.html 

      David O. McKay & Emma Ray Riggs McKay

      David O. McKay, future LDS Church president, had his first date with Emma Ray Riggs, who was called "Ray," as in sunshine, at his missionary farewell. She later joined him for a buggy ride and stroll through "low purple hills at sunset." That night, they "told each other secrets" and held hands.

      After his mission, David O. became a teacher at Weber Stake Academy in Ogden, while Ray taught at the Madison School on the other side of Lester Park. They met frequently in the park, where he eventually proposed marriage. They wed on Jan. 2, 1901, the first couple to be married in this century in the Salt Lake Temple, and, as the well-known story goes, lived joyously ever after.

      Source: David L. McKay, "Remembering Father and Mother, President David O. McKay and Sister Emma Ray Riggs McKay," Ensign, 1984, at lds.org

      The Rev. & Mrs. Sun Myung Moon

      The year 1960, when the Rev. Moon turned 40, was a turning point in the history of the world, members of the Unification Church believe. On March 27, "Heaven selected Miss Hak Ja Han to become the bride of Reverend Moon, and, on April 11, the Holy Wedding was conducted by God himself."

      Today, believers understand them as the "True Parents" of all humankind. The description derives from the view that the Rev. and Mrs. Moon are the first humans to realize the "original ideal of creation," a responsibility originally given the first human ancestors, the biblical Adam and Eve.

      Source: www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Sun_Myung_Moon and www.trueloveking.net 

      Martin Luther King & Coretta Scott King

      Martin, about their first date: "So you can do something else besides sing? You've got a good mind also. You have everything I ever wanted in a woman. We ought to get married someday."

      Coretta, about meeting Martin: "He was looking for a wife. I wasn't looking for a husband, but he was a wonderful human being. ... I still resisted his overtures, but after he persisted, I had to pray about it. ... I had a dream, and in that dream, I was made to feel that I should allow myself to be open and stop fighting the relationship. That's what I did."

      Source: usliberals.about.com/od/peopleinthenews/p/CorettaKing.htm

      William Booth & Catherine Mumford Booth

      Salvation Army founder William Booth met Catherine Mumford when the fiery preacher-to-the-poor spoke at Catherine's church. They soon fell in love and became engaged for three years. At last, on June 16, 1855, they married. Theirs was a simple ceremony with no great expense; they preferred, they said, to use all their time and money for God. Even on their honeymoon, William found himself asked to speak at meetings.

      During their ministry, Catherine was convinced that women had an equal right to speak. She and her husband were known as "generals" in the movement they founded. They marched side by side in England's slums until her death in 1890, when William kissed her tenderly and gave "his beloved wife and companion in life's long stress and storm ... to the eternal keeping of the Eternal Father."

      Source: salvos.org.au/about-us/our-history/william-and-catherine-booth.php

      Shiva & Uma

      According to Hindu tradition, Daksha, a progenitor destined to propagate the world, was displeased when his favorite daughter, Uma, chose to wed Shiva against his wishes. So Daksha invited all the world, except Shiva, for a great "fire sacrifice" ceremony. Hoping to heal the rift between her father and husband, Uma went to the gathering, but even her sisters were hesitant to talk to her, snickering and whispering. Uma could not bear the humiliation so jumped into the fire and immolated herself.

      When Shiva discovered this tragedy, he withdrew himself into deep meditation while the Earth suffered for lack of "the female principle" to make things happen.

      Soon, though, Uma was reborn as the daughter of the Himalaya Mountains and the heavenly hordes sent Kama, the God of Love (Cupid), to remove Shiva from his trance and recognize his consort reborn. Kama aimed his arrows made of flowers from a bow of sugar cane toward Shiva and finally aroused him. But he was not pleased. Shiva opened his eyes in anger and reduced Kama to ashes. However, Cupid's arrows had done their deed. Shiva looked around and spied his beloved Uma. To the joy of all, Shiva and Uma were wedded once again. It is said that anyone who listens to or reads this story is blessed with a long and happy wedded life.

      Source: Indra Neelemeggham, for the Sri Ganesha Hindu Temple in Salt Lake City

      Billy & Ruth Graham

      The two met as students at Illinois' Wheaton College, when he already was an ordained Baptist minister. ... She liked his earnestness, energy, the muscular message he preached. She came to know his gentleness and sincerity. They courted through college and married after graduation. Billy soon was traveling the country and the world leading crusades, meeting with Truman and Eisenhower at the White House, with the Queen at Buckingham Palace, with Hollywood stars and business moguls. It was a drenching wave of power and celebrity that might have swept away a lesser man; but Billy had Ruth as his firm anchor, teasing him mercilessly to puncture any temptations to pride, matching him verse for verse in his study of scripture, hauling him back from the cliff whenever he was tempted to dive too deep into the politics that fascinated him so.

      Ruth liked to tell their five children that "there comes a time to stop submitting and start outwitting" -- a rule that applied to herself as well, such as when she tried to hide a broken arm from Billy because she didn't want him to know that she had gone hang gliding.

      Source: www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1633197,00.html#ixzz0f4I5EtiM

      Saint Gianna Beretta Molla & Pietro Molla

      In 1954, Gianna, an Italian physician and devout Catholic, went on a pilgrimage to Lourdes, France, with a train of sick people. After returning from Lourdes, she confided to a friend: "I have been to Lourdes to ask Our Lady what I shall do: to go to the missions or to marry. I reached home ... and Pietro came in!"

      She married Pietro Molla, an engineer 10 years her senior, and they had four children while she continued her medical ministering. But Gianna died shortly after giving birth to the fourth one on April 21, 1962, rather than aborting the baby as her doctors suggested. She was canonized by Pope John Paul II on May 16, 2004.

      In 2002, Pietro Molla compiled 73 missives Gianna had written to him during their numerous separations titled "Love Letters to My Husband."

      Source: www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/saints/ns_lit_doc_20040516_beretta-molla_en.html




      --
      Damian J. Anderson
      Damian.Anderson@...
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