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World Science: Death from across the galaxy; new Saturn views

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  • World Science
    * Death from across the galaxy: Explosions called gamma-ray bursts could beam lethal radiation across a galaxy, frying life forms along the way, a study has
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 2, 2007
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      * Death from across the galaxy:
      Explosions called gamma-ray bursts could beam lethal
      radiation across a galaxy, frying life forms along
      the way, a study has found.

      http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/070226_grb-life.htm


      * Inching closer to regrowing spinal tissue:
      Researchers have regrown a tadpole tail in what they
      say could be a stride for regenerative medicine.

      http://www.world-science.net/othernews/070228_regeneration.htm


      * "Wound" in seafloor to be probed:
      Scientists plan to set sail to study a strange
      geological finding in the depths of the Atlantic.

      http://www.world-science.net/othernews/070301_mantle.htm


      * Seeing red affects achievement:
      Just a flash of red is enough to impair performance
      on tests, psychologists have found.

      http://www.world-science.net/othernews/070301_red.htm


      * Angry God, angry people:
      Scriptures portraying a vengeful Lord may encourage
      their readers to behave in kind, a study reports.

      http://www.world-science.net/othernews/070228_regeneration.htm


      * Mystery illness killing honeybees:
      A mysterious disease is killing many honeybee
      colonies across the U.S., threatening honey
      production and possibly crops.

      http://www.world-science.net/othernews/070228_bees.htm


      * Milky Way's black hole seen as particle smasher:
      The center of our galaxy acts as a juiced-up version
      of the particle accelerators we build on Earth,
      physicists say.

      http://www.world-science.net/othernews/070227_blackhole.htm


      * Science in images:
      New images of Saturn from NASA's Cassini mission
      provide a never-before-seen view of the ringed
      planet.

      http://www.world-science.net


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