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Re: Mike Larosa/Anthony fuel wood processor

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  • flyinterry03
    Hi Mike L, Yup, looks like ya did the same thing you did with the wheel unit... As far as drilling the holes the furnace cement I used seems to be softer than
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 1, 2009
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      Hi Mike L,
      Yup, looks like ya did the same thing you did with the wheel unit...
      As far as drilling the holes the furnace cement I used seems to be softer than what you used... Drilling the outer steel band was easy cement was easy til I hit some cast iron part way through... But the worst part was the thin piece of cast at the nozzle circle broke few bits as it was breaking through.
      Had to push out the remnants and go at it with almost no pressure. Had to use a small air drill to clear between the cab and gasifier.
      After drilling the holes, it started puffing almost violently ;-)
      After a couple of intense sneezes and it's good to go.

      Maybe a carbide tipped masonry type bit would work to ream out the holes? Me thinks it should work.

      Thinking about an insert that would be the same diameter as the nozzle circle(7-1/2"). But concerned about it be to small to let the blocks flow. Might have to make the blocks smaller. (Dammit!)
      Also thinking bout taking a 30 lb propane tank and cutting the ends off and tacking it in the hopper to see if that diameter (14"?) will work.

      I think the bottom of the present hopper is just to wide and flat/horizontal.
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WoodGas/photos/album/2017449977/pic/559311969/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=mtime&start=41&count=20&dir=desc

      If that don't get it I think I'll just put cherry bombs at strategic places in the hopper!!! :-)

      Yup, I was sorry to hear about the old guy's passing. But the daughter and hubby are some real good people. If ya make you're way up here they would be a great place to stop for a bit.

      Have fun
      TerryL




      --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "Mike LaRosa" <ook187@...> wrote:
      >
      > TerryL, Great to hear from you. Just keep burnin ! The extra holes are similar to what I did on the 66 wheel unit.
      > http://www.intergate.com/~mlarosa/images/woodgas/extra-holes.jpg
      > Worked very well. It is tough to drill through cured furnace cement. What did you do there ?? I've been trying to enlarge the ones on the large hopper gasifier. I have the steel part done and have a 3/8" bolt that I tapered and cut slots into and hardened but still can't get it to crank into that silicon cement to clean the 3/8" original hole out. I made the mistake of using a 5/16" bolt to clear the tubes while they were curing. Should have stayed full 3/8" .. I could just hammer it through as it is all drilled to 3/8" but I don't want to mess up the surrounding area. You know, like a rifle .. Mike L ... Drivin the ghost .... Oh, the first IC engines ran on producer gas .... Nice truck pic .. Too bad the old guy's gone ...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "flyinterry03" <flyinterry03@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Howdy,
      > > MikeL MikeA Paul Halverson and Everybody else.
      > >
      > > Bout a month ago I had an opportunity to go for a ride in the this truck... http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WoodGas/photos/album/2017449977/pic/766078126/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=mtime&start=1&count=20&dir=desc
      > >
      > > (a 1957 5 ton International 460 ci straight six running on Woodgas)
      > >
      > > It was a great experience! Really nice people, very helpful.
      > > The truck runs great. The last I heard they had taken to a show in Nipigon, Ontario (2 1/2 hour drive from Thunder Bay) and ran it at the show for 5 hours. Drove it home with no problems.
      > >
      > > The man who built it passed away last fall. I almost got to meet him before. But I guess it weren't ment to be.
      > >
      > > At any rate before his passing he taught the daughter and son in law how to run and maintain it.
      > > During the warm months they run it once a week.
      > >
      > > Now we get to the reason I'm writing this... The old guy had built a Woodchopper... Using a straight six block, turned it upside down and used the third? cylinder to attach a chopping head with a a cross
      > > like chopper that would go up and down above the table, that the wood passed through on.
      > > Not sure how he attached it to the crank.
      > >
      > > He cuts the wood into rounds 3 or 4 inches and pushes them under the reciprocating head with tongs. (watch them piggy's) Birch and Tamarck are the main thing they put through it.
      > > Very simple, but ya still gotta cut the rounds.
      > >
      > > Still wishing I had a camera! Next time I pass that way I 'll make sure I have one.
      > >
      > > I'm leaning towards building one of these...
      > > http://www.ekoautoilijat.fi/tekstit/videot/Saaskilahtihakkuri.AVI
      > >
      > > For MikeL and anyone else on a low bandwidth connection, this is the one like Mr Wayne's, but it splits as well.
      > > Made from a rearend and such. If ya haven't seen it... It's worth the time to download. Just click on it and go for a walk (maybe 2 walks)
      > >
      > > On my project...
      > > Managed to get 45 minutes before it bridged on the last run. Removed the cone, wood was just sticking to it.
      > > Also took Luc's suggestion and drilled 6- 1/8" holes between the existing 5/16" holes... Worked out well, Can now drive in high range.
      > > Still haven't gotten it on the highway. This truck is in rough shape! The next truck is roadworthy A Dodge 4X4 318? so I wont have to deal with that bull again.
      > > Gotta figure out why it won't start, it hit a pole then wouldn't restart... cranks just won't start. I'm not familiar with Dodge's collision shut down system. The airbags didn't deploy, So I gotta figure that out before it goes on the road for a bit than I can start converting it. More fun!!!
      > >
      > > Hope everyone is well and happy.
      > > Take care.
      > > TerryL
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "Mike LaRosa" <ook187@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Mike Anthony, I have a pretty good understanding of what it takes to process wood as I have been doing it near continuously for over 33 years. I have just encountered wood that would bend or warp near any pushrod, especially with an aluminum pot metal piston attached. At the least it would plug up my machines to process it. (see my recent 2-4-D post). One of the things I have learned in just the last year is the difference between a gasoline pop and woodgas whoosh. I'm hoping Wayne or one of the other guys with a few thousands miles behind them might comment. It seems like all the folks I know are going to be transients beginning the end of next week. The new radiator for my truck just showed up a few minutes ago .. I have a lot of crap to do in the next few days so I can make my trip to the old homeland. The chill IS in the air tonight here. Trust me, this elm would cause a problem but the stuff I did chop up will make lots of power ..... It's in the wrist action ... Mike LaRosa
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "mike o" <mikeotter@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Mike,
      > > > > Diesel components would be tougher for the job for sure. It would be worth a try either way though. The thickness of the wood would make it fairly easy to split. Walked some today checking the ditches for sucker fish and Crazy Tree.
      > > > > OOE
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "Mike LaRosa" <ook187@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Mike A, Further thoughts. I caught the whole video. Had no reason to save it but it was fun to watch a few times. Over the years I have knocked a few holes in pistons and have bent a few pushrods. I question their strength for splitting wood. In the hammer application the piston was sufficiently isolated from the impact and of course run by a single belt which bottom line would protect the whole system if the trailer springs and other items didn't do their thing. I have walked over many storm sewer grates that could be ground on the smaller side to make a die. I suppose the whole crank could be left in and a pair of the 2 simultanious pistons be fitted with the appropriate extensions to a thick flat plate to smush whatever falls between into the sharpened grate wherever it lands in the void. The grate could be spring loaded to protect the vital organs. Something's gotta be done. I need to process woods that are not normally logged here. Most of the slab is oak and even though it splts nice it is real tough on the woodgas system and operator. All these dutch elm dead trees here are my favorite fuel. Hopefully you went for a long walk today .. BBB & Regards, Mike LaRosa
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • flyinterry03
      Howdy Mike O, Here is a link to machine I would like to build... http://www.ekoautoilijat.fi/tekstit/videot/Saaskilahtihakkuri.AVI The link above goes to a
      Message 2 of 19 , Oct 1, 2009
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        Howdy Mike O,
        Here is a link to machine I would like to build...
        http://www.ekoautoilijat.fi/tekstit/videot/Saaskilahtihakkuri.AVI

        The link above goes to a smaller version of the first one I saw...
        It's built from a truck rear end. Can't find the link. I saved the file though... If ya want me to skype it to ya, gimme a holler

        This one you can control the length as you feed the wood.

        Have fun
        TerryL



        --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "mike o" <mikeotter@...> wrote:
        >
        > Terry L,
        > I credit Mike with it as he showed me the first video of such an animal. I'm not sure he understood what he was looking at in that video but I did for sure. This is exactly what I was describing. Wayne's rig is suited more for slab and thinner diameter woods in bunches. Any thing thicker than that and it's good for standard firewood. This type of processor like you seen was used by the Scandinavians and I've seen videos. It will do the firewood size stuff but it must first be wafered out with a buzzsaw or chopsaw style saw and then the coin shaped pieces dropped off the saw into the slot going to the plunging splitter.Please shoot me a video so I or you can post it to youtube.
        > Thanks for the shout out,
        > OOE
        >
        >
        > --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "flyinterry03" <flyinterry03@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Howdy,
        > > MikeL MikeA Paul Halverson and Everybody else.
        >
        > > Now we get to the reason I'm writing this... The old guy had built a Woodchopper... Using a straight six block, turned it upside down and used the third? cylinder to attach a chopping head with a a cross
        > > like chopper that would go up and down above the table, that the wood passed through on.
        > > Not sure how he attached it to the crank.
        > >
        > > He cuts the wood into rounds 3 or 4 inches and pushes them under the reciprocating head with tongs. (watch them piggy's) Birch and Tamarck are the main thing they put through it.
        > > Very simple, but ya still gotta cut the rounds.
        > >
        > > Still wishing I had a camera! Next time I pass that way I 'll make sure I have one.
        >
        > > Take care.
        > > TerryL
        >
      • mike o
        Terry, Got it. Thanks. Looks like an old Ford 1/2 ton rear axle. OOE
        Message 3 of 19 , Oct 1, 2009
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          Terry,
          Got it. Thanks. Looks like an old Ford 1/2 ton rear axle.
          OOE


          --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "flyinterry03" <flyinterry03@...> wrote:
          >
          > Howdy Mike O,
          > Here is a link to machine I would like to build...
          > The link above goes to a smaller version of the first one I saw...
          > It's built from a truck rear end. Can't find the link. I saved the file though... If ya want me to skype it to ya, gimme a holler
          > Have fun
          > TerryL
        • ron ohler
          Hi, Anyone know how many hp it takes to run that processor? Ron O ... From: mike o Subject: [WoodGas] Re: Mike Larosa/Anthony fuel wood
          Message 4 of 19 , Oct 1, 2009
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            Hi,
            Anyone know how many hp it takes to run that processor?
            Ron O

            --- On Thu, 10/1/09, mike o <mikeotter@...> wrote:


            From: mike o <mikeotter@...>
            Subject: [WoodGas] Re: Mike Larosa/Anthony fuel wood processor
            To: WoodGas@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Thursday, October 1, 2009, 8:08 AM


             



            Terry,
            Got it. Thanks. Looks like an old Ford 1/2 ton rear axle.
            OOE

            --- In WoodGas@yahoogroups .com, "flyinterry03" <flyinterry03@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > Howdy Mike O,
            > Here is a link to machine I would like to build...
            > The link above goes to a smaller version of the first one I saw...
            > It's built from a truck rear end. Can't find the link. I saved the file though... If ya want me to skype it to ya, gimme a holler
            > Have fun
            > TerryL



















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