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Re: [WoodGas] Re: Good wood stove?> Rich

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  • Jacqueline McCormack
    Wow Rich, That is so enlighting..LOL can you tell I came from the 60 s? I will have to wait to see what that link page actually said. You all are most
    Message 1 of 20 , Aug 12, 2005
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      Wow Rich,

      That is so enlighting..LOL can you tell I came from the 60's? I will have to wait to see what that link page actually said. You all are most probably correct. I noticed at times when I type to describe my agenda, I can get all kinds of perceptions but not in this case on the barrel style stove shall we say? I do want to mention due to Sheryl's original post I felt to post a repsonse. I only meant to plug for this style of stove 'n website I was given. I realize it wasn't what Sheryl needed. I do not the box stove goes for $149.00 easy. It just seems to me history stills remains the same in the sense we at times in society go back to the basics of meeting heating demands no matter how we materialize in marketing heat. And how we live in our lifestyle. I never have been into rank 'n status. So I wouldn't care if I had the most expensive way to put a log in for burning or the cheapest way to burn log. Choice and taste is the decision maker. Then again money is a factO at
      times :O)

      Jacqueline

      Richard Muszynski <frog_rider88@...> wrote:

      Greetings. Put my two cents worth in. The cast iron wood stove kit is made of cast iron, the barrel it is used on is steel. The way it is written here and I assume the way people are reading it gives the impression that what is offered is a cast iron wood stove and not simply the kit. The cast iron kit is a big thing though. Cast iron doesn't warp like the sheet metal parts kits tend to, especially the doors and door frames. I wouldn't worry too much about the barrels not being a forever part of the stove. I used one for years and simply take the cast iron components off the old stove and replace the barrels with new ones (actually used ones that I burn out to remove any residue from their former contents.) Barrels are cheap items and many times free at the local dump or land fill. When I pay for them they run usually about $5 each for nice used once ones. One thing I've never seen mentioned about the barrel stoves is that in them one can burn near anything and get heat. I
      lived in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan where the only wood available was evergreen, mainly Red Pine, which is a lousy fire wood. Wet it won't burn in a normal stove and dry it gets to weigh about like balsa wood and burns in a flash. With the barrel stove though you get the stove going with dry wood and then toss in the evergreen logs sopping wet and they burn giving off near as much heat as aged oak or hickory for hours. Heated my cabin when it was down to -40 below zero with the evergreens and kept nice and toasty. If your in a area that does not have prime firewood species like oak or hickory, maple or other heavy hard woods the burning light wood or evergreen might be a mighty important feature for you. Rich.

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    • William Carr
      ... Another two cents: for WoodGas use it sure would be nice if we could find a source of cast iron sleeves to fit inside the 55 gallon barrel. The idea of
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 12, 2005
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        On Aug 12, 2005, at 7:10 AM, Richard Muszynski wrote:

        > The cast iron wood stove kit is made of cast iron, the barrel it is
        > used on is steel.


        Another two cents: for WoodGas use it sure would be nice if we
        could find a source of cast iron sleeves to fit inside the 55 gallon
        barrel.

        The idea of making a super-sized MIDGE, with cast iron sleeve and
        insulated by three inches of ash, is intrigueing.

        William
      • Daron Page
        now that would be nice, we could have a vertical barrel built as a gasifier, and then have the exhaust go thou another barrel (which could be used as an oven)
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 12, 2005
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          now that would be nice, we could have a vertical
          barrel built as a gasifier, and then have the exhaust
          go thou another barrel (which could be used as an
          oven) to radiate heat.

          --- William Carr <Jkirk3279@...> wrote:

          >
          > On Aug 12, 2005, at 7:10 AM, Richard Muszynski
          > wrote:
          >
          > > The cast iron wood stove kit is made of cast iron,
          > the barrel it is
          > > used on is steel.
          >
          >
          > Another two cents: for WoodGas use it sure would
          > be nice if we
          > could find a source of cast iron sleeves to fit
          > inside the 55 gallon
          > barrel.
          >
          > The idea of making a super-sized MIDGE, with cast
          > iron sleeve and
          > insulated by three inches of ash, is intrigueing.
          >
          > William
          >
          >
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          S.E. of Dallas,mild winters,(long)hot and humid summers
          Daron



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        • LarenCorie
          William Carr ... Hi William; I have not mentioned this before, because I was hoping to build one first, but since before starting
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 12, 2005
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            "William Carr" <Jkirk3279@...>

            > Another two cents: for WoodGas use it sure would be nice if
            > we could find a source of cast iron sleeves to fit inside the 55
            > gallon barrel.

            > The idea of making a super-sized MIDGE, with cast iron sleeve
            > and insulated by three inches of ash, is intrigueing.

            Hi William;

            I have not mentioned this before, because I was hoping to
            build one first, but since before starting this groups, I have been
            planning to make a small wall heater, from cast iron plumbing
            drain pipe, with a woodgas burner (like a MIDGE) inside.
            I do not feel that the insulation is necessary. Using the spaces
            between cans as combustion air preheaters, has been performing
            very well, By adding only one more layer to a MIDGE keeps
            the outer surface cool enough that you can pick it up after quite
            a long burn. The heat exchange above the burner is another
            concern, as is a simplified way to reload it, hopefully while
            it is burning, in a manner that is only slightly simiilar to a rocket
            stove, like a fuel tube, with a rod to push the fuel in. I want a
            little batch gasifer to heat my van, with sticks, pellets, and charcoal.


            -Laren Corie-
            Integral Solar and Energy Efficient
            Building Designs and Consultation
            for Owner-Builders, Since 1975

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            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RefrigeratorAlternatives
          • merlyn_of_camelot
            Hi Sheryl, Northern Tool has the Century fireplace insert for $ 729.99, here is the page:
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 12, 2005
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              Hi Sheryl,
              Northern Tool has the Century fireplace insert for $ 729.99, here is
              the page:
              <http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=200307608&R=200307608>
              They also have an Ashley insert for $1099.99:
              <http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&productId=200316567&R=200316567>
              I just noticed the Century is not approved for sale in Wa or Ca, the
              Ashley is.

              Terrance

              In WoodGas@yahoogroups.com, "skmackie" <skmackie@y...> wrote:
              > I want a good wood stove insert for my fireplace to heat my small
              (less than 800 sq.ft.)
              > house. It has to be clean burning because I have asthma. The local
              dealer recommended
              > a Quadra-Fire 2700 or an Enviro Kodiak 1200. The cost of the
              inserts are about $1200.
              > After fan, a hole in my house for some environmental regulation,
              liner and labor ($585),
              > the cost would run around $3000. I live in Spokane, WA.
              >
              > Are there any good alternatives to these expensive inserts?
              >
              > Sheryl
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