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Re: [WitchesWorkshop] Re: All Male coven & masculine practice

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  • Tadeusz Bogumil
    Ohhh, how could I resist! Am I the only one who finds Purple Tom Cat s suggestion in how men should be initiated kind of hilarious in the context of her
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 1, 2006
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      Ohhh, how could I resist!

      Am I the only one who finds Purple Tom Cat's suggestion in how men should be initiated kind of hilarious in the context of her bewilderment as to from whom masculinity should be reclaimed? LOL!

      Irrespective of how "offended" you are at the suggestion that a politically correct notion of gender relations has impacted adversely on male culture, it is a fact proven by opening your eyes. The dominance of your telluric, lunar, and therefore sensualist and materialist ideology has effected the decline of the solar, traditional heroic and, yes, chivalric ideal.

      I said it before, and I will say it again: you, women, are the mother of your own contemporary woes.

      And if you find that offensive, tough titties.

      TAD

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "purpletomcat" <purplepumpkin@...>
      To: <WitchesWorkshop@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, January 29, 2006 11:06 PM
      Subject: Re: [WitchesWorkshop] Re: All Male coven & masculine practice


      >
      > rather than putting down the "politcally correct" with the politicaly
      > incorrect,
      > why not look as organising gender specific groups to teach young men about
      > being men? gentle men.
      > where are the rites of passage for young men? other than bonking at 16,
      > driving at high speed at 17 and a bit, and drinking beer till you vomit when
      > yr 18?
      >
      > the politically correct women's groups which according to you, have reached
      > their use by date, have been performing rites of passage for their younger
      > women for quite some time now.
      > personally - and i can only speak for myself - find your insinuation that
      > women's groups have impinged on your masculinity to the point where you need
      > to 'reclaim' yourself from them insulting and I'm sure I'm not the only one.
      > the women you deride are actually well in touch with their own masculinity,
      > they don't need to steal yours. the fact that you feel that its ok to demean
      > women for coming into their own power is symptomatic of your own lacking and
      > insecurities.
      >
      >
      > the gender roles of both men and women are such that large portions of our
      > psyche are shut down to conform to socially accepted gender stereotypes. if
      > a man has something to reclaim its his feminity - something he ignores to
      > his own detriment.
      >
      > No one male nor female, is to blame anyone else's lacking, that is a matter
      > for introspection and self understanding.
      > ptc

      --
      ___________________________________________________
      Play 100s of games for FREE! http://games.mail.com/
    • Pete
      ... I have not read that book but am currently reading Men s Business, Women s Business - The Spiritual Role of Gender in the Worlds Oldest Culture which so
      Message 2 of 26 , Feb 1, 2006
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        hugo wrote:
        > Yo
        >
        > Here is an interesting viewpoint. Anyone read the book?
        >
        > http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3854/is_199810/ai_n8813504
        >
        > Hugo.


        I have not read that book but am currently reading "Men's Business,
        Women's Business - The Spiritual Role of Gender in the Worlds Oldest
        Culture" which so far has been very interesting.

        For those interested or curious here is a bit about the book:



        Men's Business, Women's Business - The Spiritual Role of Gender in the
        Worlds Oldest Culture

        Beautiful stories of life in Australian Aboriginal society--where gender
        influences every aspect of existence--that show a new way to find
        happiness in our modern Western culture

        • Follows an Australian Aboriginal boy and girl from childhood through
        adolescence, adulthood, old age, and death, contrasting their
        experiences with those of ours at the same life stages

        • Presents the experience of living in a society in which every action
        is governed by the gender laws of nature and myth, and offers us ideas
        for the conduct of our lives

        For thousands of years the Ngarinyin Aboriginal culture of Australia has
        existed with almost a total division of responsibility between genders.
        This division enables both men and women to respect the power, wisdom,
        and essentiality of the other because only when the two genders work in
        harmony does their culture function as it should.

        When Hannah Rachel Bell, a committed activist and feminist, first
        encountered this culture in the 1970s she resisted such blatant gender
        division. But over her 25-year collaboration with the well-known
        Aboriginal Lawman David Mowaljarlai she found her beliefs challenged and
        finally changed. In this book Bell presents the experience of living in
        a society in which every action is governed by the laws of nature and
        myth, rather than those of commerce and politics. She offers modern
        people ideas for the conduct of their lives by raising awareness of the
        cultural processes and institutions that affect men's and women's
        authority, sovereignty, and the fulfillment of their birthright. It is a
        journey that, if traveled collectively, could change the direction and
        experience of modern culture.


        About the Author(s) of /Men's Business, Women's Business/

        Hannah Rachel Bell was consultant to the Canadian government on the
        impact of Northwest pipeline development upon indigenous peoples before
        becoming consultant to the Australian government on cocultural
        development with the Aborigines of northern Australia. She now devotes
        all her time to the Aborigine Bush University and is one of Australia's
        most sought-after speakers on the current issue of reenvisioning
        Australian society and land rights to include the native peoples. She
        lives in Western Australia.



        Pete...

        http://www.primalvision.net
      • Lilitu Babalon
        ... I do agree with that analysis. I got sent the maps book once upon a time for my radio program. I found it essentially useless for any real analysis of men
        Message 3 of 26 , Feb 1, 2006
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          purpletomcat wrote:

          >alan pease' bibliography.
          >
          >alan pease is a show man and is very good at what he does. he is successful
          > because he tells you what you want to hear. he started his career as an
          >insurance salesman, admirable but not what id call a student of psychology -
          >other than the psychology of selling and making himself rich.
          >i dont really think i would use him as a scholarly reference.
          >ptc
          >
          >
          I do agree with that analysis. I got sent the maps book once upon a time
          for my radio program. I found it essentially useless for any real
          analysis of men and women. It's aimed at a particular audience - people
          who don't want to think for themselves.

          There are a whole swag of these potion salesmen (and women) around -
          Anthony Robinns is another one. What they say seems to have a firm basis
          but is fairly flimsy when analysed properly. They are, in my humble
          opinion, the more dangerous side of the new age, and can cost you a lot
          of money before you realise - if you ever do.

          Lilitu
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