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ZS110 first light

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  • Bill Bauer
    I FINALLY got out with my ZS 110! It was amazing. I mounted it on my GM-8/Gemini using the standard Losmandy tripod at maximum height. Absolutely solid all
    Message 1 of 3 , Jun 4, 2006
      I FINALLY got out with my ZS 110! It was amazing. I mounted it on my
      GM-8/Gemini using the standard Losmandy tripod at maximum height.
      Absolutely solid all night. I'd forgotten how solid that tripod can
      be, because I usually mount my GM-8 on an ATS portable pier. Mine,
      however, is too low for visual use.

      I don't have much to say, except "WOW". Virtually no color on
      anything. I pushed it up to about 233x using a 12mm Nagler with a 4x
      Powermate. With that, the double-double showed four beautfiully
      separated points. Jupiter was amazing, although it did look a
      slightly better in an FS-102 which has slightly slower optics. M13,
      M11, NGC 6692, M82, M83 and all the usual suspects were beautiful
      (didn't use the Powermate on those)!

      I used both a 2" TV Everbrite diagonal and Stellarvue's version of the
      same. Most of my viewing was with a Takahashi 7.5 LE EP, although my
      12mm and 17mm Naglers and came out a lot, too. My friend's 3.5 and
      5mm Naglers sure worked out nicely as well.

      Inside focus test was absolutely perfect. In-focus was perfect, but
      an outside focus star test revealed something I can't define except as
      "an amorphous blob of light". No definition in it, no spherical
      shape. Odd. I'm not sure how concerned to be about this, but I've
      contacted William to ask. The Takahashi FS-102 shows the same thing,
      but to a far far lesser degree. Anyone know....is this of any concern
      if the in-focus image is virtually flawless?

      Bill
    • Kurt Friedrich
      2 points from Roland C s posts in the AP group 1) you must wait until the scope is totally cooled to the air temp, all 3 lenses. 2) Yes, but use a filter to
      Message 2 of 3 , Jun 4, 2006
        2 points from Roland C's posts in the AP group

        1) you must wait until the scope is totally cooled to
        the air temp, all 3 lenses.

        2) "Yes, but use a filter to isolate the wavelength
        that you wish to star test since in a refractor the
        various wavelengths do not correspond exactly at the
        same focal point, thus they will introduce various
        amounts of destructive and constructive interference
        on either side of focus. A filter for the various
        colors will reduce this effect.

        Roland Christen"

        I seem to also remember him saying in a post that
        inside and outside being symetrical is not a
        requirement, but I wasn't able to search that quote so
        quickly.

        I notived the same thing in my former 80 fluorite
        triplet, and I suspect the same in my ZS110, but I
        couldn't get enough back focus to check last time. I
        have since gotten a 2nd tube extender.

        Kurt


        --- Bill Bauer <bbauer@...> wrote:

        > I FINALLY got out with my ZS 110! It was amazing.
        > I mounted it on my
        > GM-8/Gemini using the standard Losmandy tripod at
        > maximum height.
        > Absolutely solid all night. I'd forgotten how solid
        > that tripod can
        > be, because I usually mount my GM-8 on an ATS
        > portable pier. Mine,
        > however, is too low for visual use.
        >
        > I don't have much to say, except "WOW". Virtually
        > no color on
        > anything. I pushed it up to about 233x using a 12mm
        > Nagler with a 4x
        > Powermate. With that, the double-double showed four
        > beautfiully
        > separated points. Jupiter was amazing, although it
        > did look a
        > slightly better in an FS-102 which has slightly
        > slower optics. M13,
        > M11, NGC 6692, M82, M83 and all the usual suspects
        > were beautiful
        > (didn't use the Powermate on those)!
        >
        > I used both a 2" TV Everbrite diagonal and
        > Stellarvue's version of the
        > same. Most of my viewing was with a Takahashi 7.5
        > LE EP, although my
        > 12mm and 17mm Naglers and came out a lot, too. My
        > friend's 3.5 and
        > 5mm Naglers sure worked out nicely as well.
        >
        > Inside focus test was absolutely perfect. In-focus
        > was perfect, but
        > an outside focus star test revealed something I
        > can't define except as
        > "an amorphous blob of light". No definition in it,
        > no spherical
        > shape. Odd. I'm not sure how concerned to be about
        > this, but I've
        > contacted William to ask. The Takahashi FS-102
        > shows the same thing,
        > but to a far far lesser degree. Anyone know....is
        > this of any concern
        > if the in-focus image is virtually flawless?
        >
        > Bill
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


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      • Bill Bauer
        I wanted to follow up on this because I discovered that I had forgotten to do so. This post is pretty much duplicated in another thread. Please email me if
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 1, 2007
          I wanted to follow up on this because I discovered that I had
          forgotten to do so. This post is pretty much duplicated in another
          thread. Please email me if you have questions. I don't visit the
          groups often. But as you might tell from my few posts, the ZS110 is
          an outstanding telescope that I can't say enough about.

          My follow-up.
          ===========
          In short:

          1. A subsequent test after better temperature equilibration minimized
          the outside versus inside focus differences. Still there, but much
          much better. These differences could also be seen to varying degrees
          on Takahashi and Tele Vue scopes.

          2. Thomas Back has a document that will enlighten you about star
          testing. Do some web searches to find it. It has good information,
          and it seems my ignorance led to misleading results. In my defense,
          many people seem to share this ignorance when testing refractors!

          3. As someone from WO pointed out to me, there must be a line drawn
          between perfection and value (my paraphrase, so don't quote this as
          anyone's words but my own). More time making the optics absolutely
          perfect increases cost. WO finds that middle ground, and I think they
          are on the winning side by far.

          And IN focus it couldn't be better. I LOVE my ZS110. I'm thinking
          about an FLT132 sight unseen, but I don't know if I will part with the
          110. Puts the Tak in its place.

          One thing that has amazed me with this scope is the fact that on one
          particularly clear night I was able to split the Iota Cass triple with
          only a 12mm Nagler. It usually takes my Tak LE7.5 EP to do this, but
          that night showed amazing clarity and really made this scope shine.

          No one should be worried about purchasing these 110 optics in either
          model tube.

          --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Bauer" <bbauer@...> wrote:
          >
          > I FINALLY got out with my ZS 110! It was amazing. I mounted it on my
          > GM-8/Gemini using the standard Losmandy tripod at maximum height.
          > Absolutely solid all night. I'd forgotten how solid that tripod can
          > be, because I usually mount my GM-8 on an ATS portable pier. Mine,
          > however, is too low for visual use.
          >
          > I don't have much to say, except "WOW". Virtually no color on
          > anything. I pushed it up to about 233x using a 12mm Nagler with a 4x
          > Powermate. With that, the double-double showed four beautfiully
          > separated points. Jupiter was amazing, although it did look a
          > slightly better in an FS-102 which has slightly slower optics. M13,
          > M11, NGC 6692, M82, M83 and all the usual suspects were beautiful
          > (didn't use the Powermate on those)!
          >
          > I used both a 2" TV Everbrite diagonal and Stellarvue's version of the
          > same. Most of my viewing was with a Takahashi 7.5 LE EP, although my
          > 12mm and 17mm Naglers and came out a lot, too. My friend's 3.5 and
          > 5mm Naglers sure worked out nicely as well.
          >
          > Inside focus test was absolutely perfect. In-focus was perfect, but
          > an outside focus star test revealed something I can't define except as
          > "an amorphous blob of light". No definition in it, no spherical
          > shape. Odd. I'm not sure how concerned to be about this, but I've
          > contacted William to ask. The Takahashi FS-102 shows the same thing,
          > but to a far far lesser degree. Anyone know....is this of any concern
          > if the in-focus image is virtually flawless?
          >
          > Bill
          >
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