Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [William-Optics] Re: Large Achromats

Expand Messages
  • Jandorf, Hal (NAVAIR)
    You re absolutely right. A real telescope is in your own perspective. I love to go to Mt Pinos in California (8800 ft elevation) where we can see down to 6th
    Message 1 of 12 , May 2, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      You're absolutely right. A "real" telescope is in your own perspective.
       
      I love to go to Mt Pinos in California (8800 ft elevation) where we can see down to 6th magnitude visual. Hundreds of telescopes are set up for observing and imaging on summer new moon weekends. I've been traveling up there since 1962. Sometimes, I see old friends with their large Dobsonians. I used to be in that crowd, setting up a 20 inch Dob. Now spent some time observing through others scopes. They're very friendly and allow me to use their scopes to find new deep sky objects that they have not seen. Then they show objects that are new for me. Sharing the cosmos.
       
      Most of the time I use the 80mm refractor. Less hassle. I just enjoy recreational observing and wide views of the Milky Way and large objects that excels in a 80mm wide field view. The Veil Nebula (entire loop), North America Nebula, Andromeda Galaxy. If I want to see a brighter, detailed image of the deep sky object, I walk a few feet to a large scope to get a better view. Sometimes I feel guilty to use someone else's scope when he/she set up that leviathan. Sometimes I help them to break them down when they leave.
       
      For me, astronomy is almost meditative. It calms my soul. A small and high quality telescope is very good medicine.
       
      --Hal
      -----Original Message-----
      From: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:William-Optics@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Rick Jack
      Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 10:14 AM
      To: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [William-Optics] Re: Large Achromats

      Hi,
       
        But your "real" telescope is only 80mm. For many of us, a real telescope is over 200mm and something we can see down to magnitude 15 and 95% of the NCG list with. I guess "real" can be taken many ways.
      Rick

      "Jandorf, Hal (NAVAIR)" <harold.jandorf@...> wrote:
      Twenty years ago, I aquired an UNITRON 4" refractor (Photo-equatorial). This gleaming, enamel white long tube (f/15!) and the mammoth wooden tripod and black equatorial head with the compliment of 60mm guidescope and 40mm finderscope made this instrument a "real" telescope! I used to look at the night sky along the refractor tube extending into infinity. In a star party, it attracted a crowd. A "real" telescope!

      But this "real" telescope, although the images were excellent, it was "just" a 4" telescope, packaged in a very heavy mount and monsterous tube. It was a real hassle to transport, set-up, and break-down, let alone storage. So after a few years, I sold it for $900. Now THAT was really stupid! I now miss that real telescope.

      Another "real" telescope is sitting in my living room. It doesn't have long gleaming white tube, just a gleaming white short tube. the tripod is wood and the equatorial mount is smaller and lighter than the by gone days and nights of the Unitron. But this telescope is a "real" telescope too. It's easily carried out every clear night and it is used for observing and imaging. It's a Megrez 80ED.

      --Hal

      -----Original Message-----
      From: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:William-Optics@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of havane45
      Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 4:57 PM
      To: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [William-Optics] Re: Large Achromats


      --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "bcuddihee" <bcuddihee@...> wrote:
      >

      > Hal,
      > Thank for the input. I grew up on a Jason 2.5 inch refractor and then
      > ground a 6 inch mirror and built a reflector..Edmunds style. I always
      > liked the way a refractor looked asthetically. Call me old fashioned,
      > but refractors just seemed to say telescope much the same way MG,
      > Porsche, and Lotus say sports cars. I guess I'm showing my age here
      > but in my book a good scope not only has to perform well, it has to
      > look great too.  Do you think the one inch difference between the 5
      > inch mak and the six inch achro is worth ditching the mak? Maybe
      > William could let us know if they plan on a large achro anytime soon.
      > Take care, Brendan
      >


      Hi, Brendan

      WO promised a few weeks ago bigger scopes.
      I understood what you mean when my 10 yo son told me, when he saw the
      ZS80, "Dad, it's a true telescope !!" He had only seen Mak and Sct before.
      It's also close to my boy's dreams and I'll buy a 5" or 6" asa
      possible because of that.

      Sure Lotus is very nice, sure my age is close to your's, but (just an
      opinion) what about US sports cars and big V8 blocks !!! (Hal, don't
      hit me, please ...) Always our boy's dreams ...

      Laurent
      West Paris








                                   www.william-optics.com
      Yahoo! Groups Links







      Get amazing travel prices for air and hotel in one click on Yahoo! FareChase

    • Rick Yent
      I have to agree. I ve only been at this a short time. Most of the time I set up both my 8 dob and my ZS66sd. Late in the evening when I m breaking down, my
      Message 2 of 12 , May 3, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        I have to agree.

        I've only been at this a short time. Most of the time
        I set up both my 8" dob and my ZS66sd. Late in the
        evening when I'm breaking down, my chair is the last
        thing to go, I'll just sit and look up at the sky for
        awhile. It is very relaxing. Having said that I still
        may have to go to 4" scope to see what I've been
        missing.

        Rick

        --- "Jandorf, Hal (NAVAIR)" <harold.jandorf@...>
        wrote:

        > You're absolutely right. A "real" telescope is in
        > your own perspective.
        >
        > I love to go to Mt Pinos in California (8800 ft
        > elevation) where we can see down to 6th magnitude
        > visual. Hundreds of telescopes are set up for
        > observing and imaging on summer new moon weekends.
        > I've been traveling up there since 1962. Sometimes,
        > I see old friends with their large Dobsonians. I
        > used to be in that crowd, setting up a 20 inch Dob.
        > Now spent some time observing through others scopes.
        > They're very friendly and allow me to use their
        > scopes to find new deep sky objects that they have
        > not seen. Then they show objects that are new for
        > me. Sharing the cosmos.
        >
        > Most of the time I use the 80mm refractor. Less
        > hassle. I just enjoy recreational observing and wide
        > views of the Milky Way and large objects that excels
        > in a 80mm wide field view. The Veil Nebula (entire
        > loop), North America Nebula, Andromeda Galaxy. If I
        > want to see a brighter, detailed image of the deep
        > sky object, I walk a few feet to a large scope to
        > get a better view. Sometimes I feel guilty to use
        > someone else's scope when he/she set up that
        > leviathan. Sometimes I help them to break them down
        > when they leave.
        >
        > For me, astronomy is almost meditative. It calms my
        > soul. A small and high quality telescope is very
        > good medicine.
        >
        > --Hal
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:William-Optics@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
        > Rick Jack
        > Sent: Tuesday, May 02, 2006 10:14 AM
        > To: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: RE: [William-Optics] Re: Large Achromats
        >
        >
        > Hi,
        >
        > But your "real" telescope is only 80mm. For many
        > of us, a real telescope is over 200mm and something
        > we can see down to magnitude 15 and 95% of the NCG
        > list with. I guess "real" can be taken many ways.
        > Rick
        >
        > "Jandorf, Hal (NAVAIR)" <harold.jandorf@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        > Twenty years ago, I aquired an UNITRON 4" refractor
        > (Photo-equatorial). This gleaming, enamel white long
        > tube (f/15!) and the mammoth wooden tripod and black
        > equatorial head with the compliment of 60mm
        > guidescope and 40mm finderscope made this instrument
        > a "real" telescope! I used to look at the night sky
        > along the refractor tube extending into infinity. In
        > a star party, it attracted a crowd. A "real"
        > telescope!
        >
        > But this "real" telescope, although the images were
        > excellent, it was "just" a 4" telescope, packaged in
        > a very heavy mount and monsterous tube. It was a
        > real hassle to transport, set-up, and break-down,
        > let alone storage. So after a few years, I sold it
        > for $900. Now THAT was really stupid! I now miss
        > that real telescope.
        >
        > Another "real" telescope is sitting in my living
        > room. It doesn't have long gleaming white tube, just
        > a gleaming white short tube. the tripod is wood and
        > the equatorial mount is smaller and lighter than the
        > by gone days and nights of the Unitron. But this
        > telescope is a "real" telescope too. It's easily
        > carried out every clear night and it is used for
        > observing and imaging. It's a Megrez 80ED.
        >
        > --Hal
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:William-Optics@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of
        > havane45
        > Sent: Monday, May 01, 2006 4:57 PM
        > To: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [William-Optics] Re: Large Achromats
        >
        >
        > --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "bcuddihee"
        > <bcuddihee@...> wrote:
        > >
        >
        > > Hal,
        > > Thank for the input. I grew up on a Jason 2.5 inch
        > refractor and then
        > > ground a 6 inch mirror and built a
        > reflector..Edmunds style. I always
        > > liked the way a refractor looked asthetically.
        > Call me old fashioned,
        > > but refractors just seemed to say telescope much
        > the same way MG,
        > > Porsche, and Lotus say sports cars. I guess I'm
        > showing my age here
        > > but in my book a good scope not only has to
        > perform well, it has to
        > > look great too. Do you think the one inch
        > difference between the 5
        > > inch mak and the six inch achro is worth ditching
        > the mak? Maybe
        > > William could let us know if they plan on a large
        > achro anytime soon.
        > > Take care, Brendan
        > >
        >
        >
        > Hi, Brendan
        >
        > WO promised a few weeks ago bigger scopes.
        > I understood what you mean when my 10 yo son told
        > me, when he saw the
        > ZS80, "Dad, it's a true telescope !!" He had only
        > seen Mak and Sct before.
        > It's also close to my boy's dreams and I'll buy a 5"
        > or 6" asa
        > possible because of that.
        >
        > Sure Lotus is very nice, sure my age is close to
        > your's, but (just an
        > opinion) what about US sports cars and big V8 blocks
        > !!! (Hal, don't
        > hit me, please ...) Always our boy's dreams ...
        >
        > Laurent
        > West Paris
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > www.william-optics.com
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > Get amazing travel prices for air and hotel in one
        > click on Yahoo!
        >
        <http://farechase.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTFpMnJnZ3IxBF9TAzk3NDA3NTg5BHNlYwNtYWlsLXRhZ2xpbmVzBHNsawNmYXJlY2hhc2UtMDQyNzA2>
        > FareChase
        >
        > www.william-optics.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS
        > Astronomy
        >
        <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Astronomy+telescope&w1=Astronomy+telescope&w2=Fun&w3=Telescope&c=3&s=49&.sig=syKMXNixDs0j1roHrGSFJw>
        > telescope Fun
        >
        <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Fun&w1=Astronomy+telescope&w2=Fun&w3=Telescope&c=3&s=49&.sig=n9n2MCWvsoVzrAJqVYEODg>
        > Telescope
        >
        <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Telescope&w1=Astronomy+telescope&w2=Fun&w3=Telescope&c=3&s=49&.sig=rPLphHzymNbywca3_P8-5w>
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        >
        >
        > * Visit your group " William-Optics
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/William-Optics> " on
        > the web.
        >
        >
        > * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > William-Optics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        <mailto:William-Optics-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>
        >
        >
        >
        > * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
        > Yahoo! Terms of Service
        > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> .
        >
        >
        >
        === message truncated ===


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        http://mail.yahoo.com
      • Rick Yent
        Hello Timm, I too would like to see the comparison between the FD and the new ED. I would buy the FD in a heartbeat but I just can t swing it at this time Rick
        Message 3 of 12 , May 3, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello Timm,

          I too would like to see the comparison between the FD
          and the new ED. I would buy the FD in a heartbeat but
          I just can't swing it at this time

          Rick

          --- Timm Bottoni <t.bottoni@...> wrote:

          > Hi Hal,
          >
          > Good to see you posting again in full force. I can
          > honestly say that
          > at this point in my life, the Megrez II 80 FD (via
          > APOgrade) on the
          > EZTouch (or on my modified Nexstar GT mount) is the
          > best setup for
          > me. Why?
          >
          > Because I can use it a lot. I can use it on my deck
          > with a five
          > minute setup, I can use it if I travel, I can use it
          > as a spotting
          > scope, I can use it as a 555mm lens for my Canon
          > 20D, and I can use
          > it for astrophotography.
          >
          > It has been said many times that the best telescope
          > for you is the
          > one you use a lot, and high quality, 80mm
          > refractors, on an easy to
          > setup, easy to transport mount fall squarely into
          > that category. It
          > used to be that an 80mm short tube was "OK if you
          > don't mind the
          > false color or don't mind paying a fortune for an
          > Apochromat" but
          > thanks to WO, the price performance curve has
          > shifted greatly.
          > Clearly, with the large number of competitors in
          > this market space,
          > the desire to own an 80mm APO must be high on the
          > list of many
          > amateur astronomers.
          >
          > While I would love to own a 5", or 6" APO or an 8"
          > or larger scope
          > like a high quality SCT someday, its just not the
          > best fit for my
          > needs right now, like the high quality / reasonably
          > priced 80mm APO
          > WO scopes are right now.
          >
          > I'm curious who will be the first to write a review
          > and comparison of
          > the new ZS 80 II ED, and what they say.
          > Unfortunately it won't be
          > me, I am sticking with my Megrez II 80 FD!
          >
          > Timm
          >
          > --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "Jandorf, Hal
          > \(NAVAIR\)"
          > <harold.jandorf@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Twenty years ago, I aquired an UNITRON 4"
          > refractor (Photo-
          > equatorial). This gleaming, enamel white long tube
          > (f/15!) and the
          > mammoth wooden tripod and black equatorial head with
          > the compliment
          > of 60mm guidescope and 40mm finderscope made this
          > instrument a "real"
          > telescope! I used to look at the night sky along the
          > refractor tube
          > extending into infinity. In a star party, it
          > attracted a crowd.
          > A "real" telescope!
          > >
          > > But this "real" telescope, although the images
          > were excellent, it
          > was "just" a 4" telescope, packaged in a very heavy
          > mount and
          > monsterous tube. It was a real hassle to transport,
          > set-up, and break-
          > down, let alone storage. So after a few years, I
          > sold it for $900.
          > Now THAT was really stupid! I now miss that real
          > telescope.
          > >
          > > Another "real" telescope is sitting in my living
          > room. It doesn't
          > have long gleaming white tube, just a gleaming white
          > short tube. the
          > tripod is wood and the equatorial mount is smaller
          > and lighter than
          > the by gone days and nights of the Unitron. But this
          > telescope is
          > a "real" telescope too. It's easily carried out
          > every clear night and
          > it is used for observing and imaging. It's a Megrez
          > 80ED.
          > >
          > > --Hal
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >


          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          http://mail.yahoo.com
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.