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ZS 105 - My first seeing report

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  • Jeremy Francisco
    Finally! Clear and dark skies greeted me last night and I drove 30 minutes north to truly dark skies in the middle of Pawnee National Grasslands (CO). After
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 23, 2006
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      Finally!  Clear and dark skies greeted me last night and I drove 30 minutes north to truly dark skies in the middle of Pawnee National Grasslands (CO).  After two hours of sub-twenty degree weather I reluctantly packed up and drove home, but not before some celestial treats.  

      I must say that the more I use my ZS 105, the more I like it.  After reading all of the reports about how great the ZS 10th Anniversary scope is and what great views everyone was getting, I had been questioning my sanity in giving mine up in order to get the ZS 105.  I doubt no more; here are my impressions (basically notes to myself on what I saw.)

      Seeing tonight was steady and very dark.  For the record, I did not observe any chromatic aberration while the telescope was in focus.  There was a little violet on the top of Sirius when the scope was focused to the front, but I could not see any when it was focused to the rear.  The only color visible was the true color of the stars.

      Equipment Used:

      Telescope - William Optics ZS 105 w/ Burgess 2” dielectric diagonal
      Eyepieces - TMB/Burgess 6-mm; WO binoviewers with 20mm WO and 1.6 corrector, the 20mm WO alone
      Mount - Stellarvue M6

      Saturn - At 196x the Cassini division was very clear and obvious.  I was able to observe horizontal stripes on the planet proper as well as shadows created by the rings on the planet and planet on the rings.

      M42/43 & NGC 1977 - Wow!  The nebula looked like water caught in an eddy of a fast moving stream; I’ve never seen that much detail in this nebula before.  The trapezium was resolved to six stars, the first time I have been able to see the sixth star. 

      M31, M32 & M110 - Under lesser light I was unable to see M32 & M110 clearly,  so I wanted to glimpse all three.  Tonight there was no doubt as to what I was seeing, all three galaxies were evident with 110 clearly visible.

      M33 - I realize this galaxy is easily washed out in light polluted skies and that light pollution to night was quite low, but I was surprised as to how bright M33 was.  The amount of detail visible was wonderful;  using averted vision I could make out the arms of the galaxy!

      M45 - The nebulosity was beautiful tonight.

      Sigma Orionis and Beta Monocerotis - Both star systems resolved very nicely.  Speaking of color, the colors of the stars were visible; the red of star D in Sigma Orionis etc.

      Horsehead Nebula - I was finally able to see this nebula.  This has always been one of my favorite photographed nebulas and I was finally able to see it in person.  A faint fuzzy,  but it was there.

      M44 & M41 - I did not spend much time on these and when ahead and took a peak since I was in the neighborhood.  The most interesting thing that I noted was the color of the stars.  Most noted was the orange star in the middle of M41; contrasted nicely with the other stars.

      Sirius - Incredibly bright star; the only color I saw was the hot white/blue of the star.   No coloration on the fringe noticed.

      I realize that I moved around a lot last night and did not take a tremendous amount of time on any one object; ten to fifteen minutes each.  Seeing as how this was my first time under extremely good skies, I was like a kid in a candy store.  I assume I’ll eventually settle down and take my time as I gain more experience.  Considering it has been over fifteen years since I last looked to the heavens in a telescope, I feel I did quite well last night.

      Tired  but fulfilled,

      Jeremy F
    • Barry Carter
      Nice report. I am eager to get out and do something similar; prehaps tonight. The M42 observation was really nice. http://www.barrie-tao.com/wotriplet.html
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 23, 2006
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        Nice report. I am eager to get out and do something similar;
        prehaps tonight. The M42 observation was really nice.

        http://www.barrie-tao.com/wotriplet.html

        Ciao...Barry


        --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, Jeremy Francisco
        <jeremyfrancisco@m...> wrote:
        >
        > Finally! Clear and dark skies greeted me last night and I drove
        30
        > minutes north to truly dark skies in the middle of Pawnee
        National
        > Grasslands (CO). After two hours of sub-twenty degree weather I
        > reluctantly packed up and drove home, but not before some
        celestial
        > treats.
        >
        > I must say that the more I use my ZS 105, the more I like it.
        After
        > reading all of the reports about how great the ZS 10th
        Anniversary
        > scope is and what great views everyone was getting, I had been
        > questioning my sanity in giving mine up in order to get the ZS
        105.
        > I doubt no more; here are my impressions (basically notes to
        myself
        > on what I saw.)
        >
        > Seeing tonight was steady and very dark. For the record, I did
        not
        > observe any chromatic aberration while the telescope was in
        focus.
        > There was a little violet on the top of Sirius when the scope was
        > focused to the front, but I could not see any when it was focused
        to
        > the rear. The only color visible was the true color of the stars.
        >
        > Equipment Used:
        >
        > Telescope - William Optics ZS 105 w/ Burgess 2" dielectric diagonal
        > Eyepieces - TMB/Burgess 6-mm; WO binoviewers with 20mm WO and 1.6
        > corrector, the 20mm WO alone
        > Mount - Stellarvue M6
        >
        > Saturn - At 196x the Cassini division was very clear and obvious.
        I
        > was able to observe horizontal stripes on the planet proper as
        well
        > as shadows created by the rings on the planet and planet on the
        rings.
        >
        > M42/43 & NGC 1977 - Wow! The nebula looked like water caught in
        an
        > eddy of a fast moving stream; I've never seen that much detail in
        > this nebula before. The trapezium was resolved to six stars, the
        > first time I have been able to see the sixth star.
        >
        > M31, M32 & M110 - Under lesser light I was unable to see M32 &
        M110
        > clearly, so I wanted to glimpse all three. Tonight there was no
        > doubt as to what I was seeing, all three galaxies were evident
        with
        > 110 clearly visible.
        >
        > M33 - I realize this galaxy is easily washed out in light
        polluted
        > skies and that light pollution to night was quite low, but I was
        > surprised as to how bright M33 was. The amount of detail visible
        was
        > wonderful; using averted vision I could make out the arms of the
        > galaxy!
        >
        > M45 - The nebulosity was beautiful tonight.
        >
        > Sigma Orionis and Beta Monocerotis - Both star systems resolved
        very
        > nicely. Speaking of color, the colors of the stars were visible;
        the
        > red of star D in Sigma Orionis etc.
        >
        > Horsehead Nebula - I was finally able to see this nebula. This
        has
        > always been one of my favorite photographed nebulas and I was
        finally
        > able to see it in person. A faint fuzzy, but it was there.
        >
        > M44 & M41 - I did not spend much time on these and when ahead and
        > took a peak since I was in the neighborhood. The most
        interesting
        > thing that I noted was the color of the stars. Most noted was
        the
        > orange star in the middle of M41; contrasted nicely with the
        other
        > stars.
        >
        > Sirius - Incredibly bright star; the only color I saw was the hot
        > white/blue of the star. No coloration on the fringe noticed.
        >
        > I realize that I moved around a lot last night and did not take a
        > tremendous amount of time on any one object; ten to fifteen
        minutes
        > each. Seeing as how this was my first time under extremely good
        > skies, I was like a kid in a candy store. I assume I'll
        eventually
        > settle down and take my time as I gain more experience.
        Considering
        > it has been over fifteen years since I last looked to the heavens
        in
        > a telescope, I feel I did quite well last night.
        >
        > Tired but fulfilled,
        >
        > Jeremy F
        >
      • Eddy & Muriel
        Yes, nice report. WO makes wonderful scopes, isn t it? I just found a remote area (hopefully dark as well) over the weekend and it is not too far from my
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 23, 2006
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          Yes, nice report. WO makes wonderful scopes, isn't it?

          I just found a remote area (hopefully dark as well) over the weekend and it
          is not too far from my house. Going to take my ZS80FD there and hope to see
          the same
          details as you have. Although the 80mm cannot compete with the 105mm
          (otherwise WO wouldn't sell any 105 anymore - just kidding)

          Eddy

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Barry Carter" <chiron666@...>
          To: <William-Optics@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, 23 January, 2006 15:18
          Subject: [William-Optics] Re: ZS 105 - My first seeing report


          > Nice report. I am eager to get out and do something similar;
          > prehaps tonight. The M42 observation was really nice.
          >
          > http://www.barrie-tao.com/wotriplet.html
          >
          > Ciao...Barry
          >
          >
          > --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, Jeremy Francisco
          > <jeremyfrancisco@m...> wrote:
          >>
          >> Finally! Clear and dark skies greeted me last night and I drove
          > 30
          >> minutes north to truly dark skies in the middle of Pawnee
          > National
          >> Grasslands (CO). After two hours of sub-twenty degree weather I
          >> reluctantly packed up and drove home, but not before some
          > celestial
          >> treats.
          >>
          >> I must say that the more I use my ZS 105, the more I like it.
          > After
          >> reading all of the reports about how great the ZS 10th
          > Anniversary
          >> scope is and what great views everyone was getting, I had been
          >> questioning my sanity in giving mine up in order to get the ZS
          > 105.
          >> I doubt no more; here are my impressions (basically notes to
          > myself
          >> on what I saw.)
          >>
          >> Seeing tonight was steady and very dark. For the record, I did
          > not
          >> observe any chromatic aberration while the telescope was in
          > focus.
          >> There was a little violet on the top of Sirius when the scope was
          >> focused to the front, but I could not see any when it was focused
          > to
          >> the rear. The only color visible was the true color of the stars.
          >>
          >> Equipment Used:
          >>
          >> Telescope - William Optics ZS 105 w/ Burgess 2" dielectric diagonal
          >> Eyepieces - TMB/Burgess 6-mm; WO binoviewers with 20mm WO and 1.6
          >> corrector, the 20mm WO alone
          >> Mount - Stellarvue M6
          >>
          >> Saturn - At 196x the Cassini division was very clear and obvious.
          > I
          >> was able to observe horizontal stripes on the planet proper as
          > well
          >> as shadows created by the rings on the planet and planet on the
          > rings.
          >>
          >> M42/43 & NGC 1977 - Wow! The nebula looked like water caught in
          > an
          >> eddy of a fast moving stream; I've never seen that much detail in
          >> this nebula before. The trapezium was resolved to six stars, the
          >> first time I have been able to see the sixth star.
          >>
          >> M31, M32 & M110 - Under lesser light I was unable to see M32 &
          > M110
          >> clearly, so I wanted to glimpse all three. Tonight there was no
          >> doubt as to what I was seeing, all three galaxies were evident
          > with
          >> 110 clearly visible.
          >>
          >> M33 - I realize this galaxy is easily washed out in light
          > polluted
          >> skies and that light pollution to night was quite low, but I was
          >> surprised as to how bright M33 was. The amount of detail visible
          > was
          >> wonderful; using averted vision I could make out the arms of the
          >> galaxy!
          >>
          >> M45 - The nebulosity was beautiful tonight.
          >>
          >> Sigma Orionis and Beta Monocerotis - Both star systems resolved
          > very
          >> nicely. Speaking of color, the colors of the stars were visible;
          > the
          >> red of star D in Sigma Orionis etc.
          >>
          >> Horsehead Nebula - I was finally able to see this nebula. This
          > has
          >> always been one of my favorite photographed nebulas and I was
          > finally
          >> able to see it in person. A faint fuzzy, but it was there.
          >>
          >> M44 & M41 - I did not spend much time on these and when ahead and
          >> took a peak since I was in the neighborhood. The most
          > interesting
          >> thing that I noted was the color of the stars. Most noted was
          > the
          >> orange star in the middle of M41; contrasted nicely with the
          > other
          >> stars.
          >>
          >> Sirius - Incredibly bright star; the only color I saw was the hot
          >> white/blue of the star. No coloration on the fringe noticed.
          >>
          >> I realize that I moved around a lot last night and did not take a
          >> tremendous amount of time on any one object; ten to fifteen
          > minutes
          >> each. Seeing as how this was my first time under extremely good
          >> skies, I was like a kid in a candy store. I assume I'll
          > eventually
          >> settle down and take my time as I gain more experience.
          > Considering
          >> it has been over fifteen years since I last looked to the heavens
          > in
          >> a telescope, I feel I did quite well last night.
          >>
          >> Tired but fulfilled,
          >>
          >> Jeremy F
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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