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RE: [William Optics] What can you see with a Zenithstar 80 APO?

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  • john robert adamson
    Hi What would I expect to see in an 80mm refractor. I have a 90mm Megrez and it clearly shows Phases of Mercury, Venus. The Galilean moons of Jupiter and
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 6, 2013
      Hi
      What would I expect to see in an 80mm refractor. I have a 90mm Megrez and it
      clearly shows Phases of Mercury, Venus. The Galilean moons of Jupiter and
      their phenomena, some of Jupiter's belts. 3 Moons of Saturn sometimes in
      favourable conditions 4 moons. I have found all the messier objects visible
      at 52deg N.
      In a dark sky it should perform even better.

      robert

      -----Original Message-----
      From: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com [mailto:William-Optics@yahoogroups.com]
      On Behalf Of steve_honeybun
      Sent: 05 January 2013 22:02
      To: William-Optics@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [William Optics] What can you see with a Zenithstar 80 APO?

      Hi! I know this sounds like a dumb question but please bear with me. I'm new
      to Astronomy and I've not had the chance to look through this size refractor
      yet as the people in my group have larger reflectors. However, For practical
      reasons I'd really like to get a Zenithstar; it's portable, doesn't take up
      a lot of storage space and has a reputation for good optics. But what
      exactly can I reasonably expect to see? For example, if I look at the Orion
      nebula will I see a beautiful full frame image (I know it's wishful thinking
      but I can dream) or will I see a fuzzy blob in one area of the field? Thanks
      for your help!



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    • steve_honeybun
      ... Thanks very much Perry and Robert! Your answers make things a lot clearer. Basicly, with good viewing I should be able to comfortably see the main planetry
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 7, 2013
        --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "steve_honeybun" wrote:
        >
        > Hi! I know this sounds like a dumb question but please bear with me. I'm new to Astronomy and I've not had the chance to look through this size refractor yet as the people in my group have larger reflectors. However, For practical reasons I'd really like to get a Zenithstar; it's portable, doesn't take up a lot of storage space and has a reputation for good optics. But what exactly can I reasonably expect to see? For example, if I look at the Orion nebula will I see a beautiful full frame image (I know it's wishful thinking but I can dream) or will I see a fuzzy blob in one area of the field? Thanks for your help!
        >

        Thanks very much Perry and Robert! Your answers make things a lot clearer. Basicly, with good viewing I should be able to comfortably see the main planetry objects and if I have the correct eye piece I should be able to pick out the Messier objects as well.
        Would you recommend any eyepieces for this scope? I read somewhere that the maximum magnification per inch of scope diameter is 50X, but I'd have a ridiculously short eyepiece to achieve that. I guess the choise of longer eyepiece focal lenghts are limited by the max FOV of the scope. What do you think?
        Cheers!
        Steve
      • Gianluca Sordiglioni
        You have Zenithstar 80 wich uses FLT51 glasses, I have a Megrez 90 with the better 53 type. However under dark skies in Orion you can clearly see all the
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 7, 2013
          You have Zenithstar 80 wich uses FLT51 glasses, I have a Megrez 90 with the better 53 type. However under dark skies in Orion you can clearly see all the nebula using a 24mm circa low-power eyepiece (impossible on large dobson!).
          Or you can zoom-in to see the 4-stars deep inside the nebula, sometimes you can see six of them under excellent seeing (1-2 times per year).
          Or you can mid-zoom to appreciate the tiny filaments in M42 as white soft clouds, or wings of a seagull. You can lost yourself for hours trying to follow all the shapes.
          On Jupiter I counted 9 colored band. Some people called me crazy, but on anĀ  apo well built (and seeing) it is possible.
          On Saturn you clearly distinguish Cassini division, the Enke with difficulty but still visible.
          The 4mm WO eyepiece is even enouhgt to split double stars, Mintaka for example, or sigma orionis.
          Enjoy yourself !

        • jtorelli76063
          I have a Z-80 and it is a very nice scope. I have it mounted on top of my LX200-12 classic. I use it as my wide field scope. It has very good optics and the
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 7, 2013
            I have a Z-80 and it is a very nice scope. I have it mounted on top of my LX200-12 classic. I use it as my wide field scope. It has very good optics and the dual speed focuser is very smooth. I mainly image thru this scope. With a barlow I use it as a guider scope for the SCT.
            Looking thru it with a 26mm ep gives very wide view. This will make the planets look small but gives great views of DSO's like M42.
            If I have guests over I like to show them the view of the same object thru both scopes. It gives them a better understanding of what they are seeing.

            JoeT

            --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "steve_honeybun" wrote:
            >
            > Hi! I know this sounds like a dumb question but please bear with me. I'm new to Astronomy and I've not had the chance to look through this size refractor yet as the people in my group have larger reflectors. However, For practical reasons I'd really like to get a Zenithstar; it's portable, doesn't take up a lot of storage space and has a reputation for good optics. But what exactly can I reasonably expect to see? For example, if I look at the Orion nebula will I see a beautiful full frame image (I know it's wishful thinking but I can dream) or will I see a fuzzy blob in one area of the field? Thanks for your help!
            >
          • steve_honeybun
            Hi! I just wanted to thank you all for your help. I bought the ZenithStar 80 with a set of SPL eyepieces and put it on a CG5 mount and I have to say I m
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 20, 2013
              Hi!

              I just wanted to thank you all for your help. I bought the ZenithStar 80 with a set of SPL eyepieces and put it on a CG5 mount and I have to say I'm completely blown away.

              We had a BBC Stargazing live event with my local group last weekend and everyone commented on how good the optics are. Most people just said 'Wow!!' and then crowded me off my scope. It brings a grin to my face just thinking about it.

              Once again, Thank You and Thank You Williams Optics for making such a great telescope.

              Steve


              --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "jtorelli76063" <josephtorelli@...> wrote:
              >
              > I have a Z-80 and it is a very nice scope. I have it mounted on top of my LX200-12 classic. I use it as my wide field scope. It has very good optics and the dual speed focuser is very smooth. I mainly image thru this scope. With a barlow I use it as a guider scope for the SCT.
              > Looking thru it with a 26mm ep gives very wide view. This will make the planets look small but gives great views of DSO's like M42.
              > If I have guests over I like to show them the view of the same object thru both scopes. It gives them a better understanding of what they are seeing.
              >
              > JoeT
              >
              > --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "steve_honeybun" wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi! I know this sounds like a dumb question but please bear with me. I'm new to Astronomy and I've not had the chance to look through this size refractor yet as the people in my group have larger reflectors. However, For practical reasons I'd really like to get a Zenithstar; it's portable, doesn't take up a lot of storage space and has a reputation for good optics. But what exactly can I reasonably expect to see? For example, if I look at the Orion nebula will I see a beautiful full frame image (I know it's wishful thinking but I can dream) or will I see a fuzzy blob in one area of the field? Thanks for your help!
              > >
              >
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