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First tentative steps...

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  • runningivor
    After a long frustrating wait of a couple of years I now find myself the proud owner of a FLT 110, which inevitably lead to three frustrating weeks of cloudy
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 6, 2010
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      After a long frustrating wait of a couple of years I now find myself the proud owner of a FLT 110, which inevitably lead to three frustrating weeks of cloudy nights in the South East of England. I picked the FLT110 based of it's portability and the quality of astrophotography I've seen produced in this forum, this is my first telescope so I know I've a lot to learn (which is part of the fun) and there's a lot to play around with before I start taking any decent images. As part of my learning curve I tried to take some pictures of Saturn a couple of nights ago, from my prior research I understand a video camera through a good eyepiece would be the best choice, but I'm assuming my EOS400 and the WO VI flattener should be able to produce half decent images as well. I've set the flattener to 73.5 as recommend for the FLT 110, refocused as best I could (which appeared to be around 10mm on the focuser) and took a number of shots at various ISO values and exposure times, alas even the short exposures of less than a second appearing fuzzy and over exposed.

      I thought about reducing the exposure down to 1/25 sec and taking loads of shots in a simulated webcam sort of way but I'm not sure that's a better approach either. I'd be grateful for any tips and advise on how to approach this (even telling me it's a pointless exercise) and I'd also be interested in learning how other's have approached getting the shots via a EOS 350/400 in focus, I've started writing a C# programme to control the camera from the netbook but without a live feed it can only be the last shot taken.

      Thanks in advance
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