Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

WO Zenithstar 66 SD Apo

Expand Messages
  • w.stanley07
    I would like to purchase a lightweight portable telescope to view planets, moon, Orion from downtown large city in Canada. Do you know if the WO Zenithstar 66
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 24, 2006
      I would like to purchase a lightweight portable telescope to view
      planets, moon, Orion from downtown large city in Canada.
      Do you know if the WO Zenithstar 66 SD APO telescope would be a
      reasonable choice given that I would then only require a lightweight
      tripod?
    • havane45
      ... Hi, Having a 66sd and a 80fd, I could compare them as two grab and go scopes when in holidays. My opinion (just my opinion with my eyes !!) is that both of
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 24, 2006
        --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "w.stanley07" <w.stanley07@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I would like to purchase a lightweight portable telescope to view
        > planets, moon, Orion from downtown large city in Canada.
        > Do you know if the WO Zenithstar 66 SD APO telescope would be a
        > reasonable choice given that I would then only require a lightweight
        > tripod?
        >

        Hi,

        Having a 66sd and a 80fd, I could compare them as two grab and go
        scopes when in holidays.
        My opinion (just my opinion with my eyes !!) is that both of them are
        very nice scopes but the 66 is definitively a bit too small for visual
        (except for day time).
        The 80 will work on a light tripod too ; if you can afford it, you
        will no regret.

        Laurent
      • Alan
        I have the 66 Petzval which I purchased for widefield astroimaging. I am very happy with the scope for that purpose! However...if you plan to use the scope
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 24, 2006
          I have the 66 Petzval which I purchased for widefield astroimaging. I
          am very happy with the scope for that purpose! However...if you plan
          to use the scope for visual of the moon, planets...I think you will be
          vastly disappointed. For those...I have an LX200 10". If $$ is your
          limiting factor...consider the purchase of a 8" or 10" dobsonian!
          Just my 2 cents. Alan
        • danieldgj
          66 mm is too small for much planetary work. Even 80mm is small, though it will show you a few bands on Jupiter and the rings of Saturn. The 66 mm would be
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 24, 2006
            66 mm is too small for much planetary work. Even 80mm is small,
            though it will show you a few bands on Jupiter and the rings of
            Saturn. The 66 mm would be nice for a few photographic subjects that
            are large in size, such as the Andromeda galaxy, but very limited for
            night-time visual use in a city. (It might give nice views of large
            areas under dark skies, much as binoculars do, but both the light
            grasp and the limiting magnification make it marginal for planets.)
            If you want to see planets, aperture helps a lot--not so much for
            light grasp as for useful magnification. Despite the central
            obstruction of a Dobsonian, you will get better views of the planets
            from an inexpensive Dob 6 inches in size. Consider the Orion 6-inch
            noncomputerized Dob for a similar price to the 66:
            http://www.telescope.com/jump.jsp?itemType=CATEGORY&itemID=9
            The view of planets will be vastly superior through the 6-inch Dob.
            Absolutely no comparison.

            Daniel Johnson

            --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "w.stanley07" <w.stanley07@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I would like to purchase a lightweight portable telescope to view
            > planets, moon, Orion from downtown large city in Canada.
            > Do you know if the WO Zenithstar 66 SD APO telescope would be a
            > reasonable choice given that I would then only require a lightweight
            > tripod?
            >
          • markleewebb
            I have been using a new WO 66mm for a few weeks as a finder for my larger refractor. Pros: crisp, clear images. Jet black sky. No color at all on moon. Stars
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 25, 2006
              I have been using a new WO 66mm for a few weeks as a finder for my
              larger refractor.

              Pros: crisp, clear images. Jet black sky. No color at all on moon.
              Stars are pinpoints. Excellent star test. Great focuser. All-around
              well made scope.

              Cons: On all the DSO's I have used it on - other than M42 Orion and
              M31 Andromeda the images in scope are teeny tiny barely perceptable
              fuzzy stars. M31 Andromeda is a faint fuzzy with anything lower power
              than a 20mm ep. With a 16mm UO Konig or 12.5mm UO Ortho it gave a nice
              image you would be pleased with. On M42 Orion, the nebulae is tiny in
              the fov. It's there, you can see it, it's the Orion nebulae, but it is
              small.

              For visual use, I think you would soon tire of this scope and want
              more aperture. Your opportunities to observe objects with it are just
              severely limited because it's just a very small scope. An 80mm scope
              would make a huge difference and allow for more observing of more
              objects; if you only had one scope and wanted it to be a grab and go I
              think you would be happier with an 80mm scope for visual observing. As
              an example, when looking for the Ring nebulae we could not find it in
              the WO 66mm refractor. We had to use the main scope with a very low
              power ep/wide fov to find it - it did not even show up in WO66 as a
              faint fuzzy. I had two other more experienced observers try and find
              it in the WO 66. One could not find it, the other said he may have
              seen it. I may sell the 66 and go with an 80 for a finder because of
              this. It's a great scope, but it's just very small for visual.

              --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "w.stanley07" <w.stanley07@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I would like to purchase a lightweight portable telescope to view
              > planets, moon, Orion from downtown large city in Canada.
              > Do you know if the WO Zenithstar 66 SD APO telescope would be a
              > reasonable choice given that I would then only require a lightweight
              > tripod?
              >
            • Bernard Forman
              Frankly, a simple, solid tube dob, even as big as a 10 inch (a six or eight inch if weight is an issue) is a far better first scope all around, even grab and
              Message 6 of 6 , Nov 25, 2006
                Frankly, a simple, solid tube dob, even as big as a 10
                inch (a six or eight inch if weight is an issue) is a
                far better first scope all around, even "grab and go"
                as there is only the solid tube and base to deal with.
                Small refractors are great for (1) photography and
                (2) wide field views. Certainly not for visual
                planetary viewing where a much less expensive
                reflector will blow away my ZS 105. There is no
                perfect single scope. I'd probably even want to check
                out one of the 5 inch Chinese maks first before
                chosing a 66mm refractor. Of course, for the moon,
                any scope, even a 50mm, will show an amazing amount of
                detail. I've also been impressed with the Starblast
                from Orion. But knowing what I know now, I'd never
                buy a refractor as a first/only scope (which I did).

                The best advice is to join a club and go to a star
                party before buying a telescope. The RASC has centers
                (centres for you Canadians) in the larger cities so I
                would check the local centre out.

                Bernie


                --- markleewebb <webb.m@...> wrote:

                > I have been using a new WO 66mm for a few weeks as a
                > finder for my
                > larger refractor.
                >
                > Pros: crisp, clear images. Jet black sky. No color
                > at all on moon.
                > Stars are pinpoints. Excellent star test. Great
                > focuser. All-around
                > well made scope.
                >
                > Cons: On all the DSO's I have used it on - other
                > than M42 Orion and
                > M31 Andromeda the images in scope are teeny tiny
                > barely perceptable
                > fuzzy stars. M31 Andromeda is a faint fuzzy with
                > anything lower power
                > than a 20mm ep. With a 16mm UO Konig or 12.5mm UO
                > Ortho it gave a nice
                > image you would be pleased with. On M42 Orion, the
                > nebulae is tiny in
                > the fov. It's there, you can see it, it's the Orion
                > nebulae, but it is
                > small.
                >
                > For visual use, I think you would soon tire of this
                > scope and want
                > more aperture. Your opportunities to observe objects
                > with it are just
                > severely limited because it's just a very small
                > scope. An 80mm scope
                > would make a huge difference and allow for more
                > observing of more
                > objects; if you only had one scope and wanted it to
                > be a grab and go I
                > think you would be happier with an 80mm scope for
                > visual observing. As
                > an example, when looking for the Ring nebulae we
                > could not find it in
                > the WO 66mm refractor. We had to use the main scope
                > with a very low
                > power ep/wide fov to find it - it did not even show
                > up in WO66 as a
                > faint fuzzy. I had two other more experienced
                > observers try and find
                > it in the WO 66. One could not find it, the other
                > said he may have
                > seen it. I may sell the 66 and go with an 80 for a
                > finder because of
                > this. It's a great scope, but it's just very small
                > for visual.
                >
                > --- In William-Optics@yahoogroups.com, "w.stanley07"
                > <w.stanley07@...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > I would like to purchase a lightweight portable
                > telescope to view
                > > planets, moon, Orion from downtown large city in
                > Canada.
                > > Do you know if the WO Zenithstar 66 SD APO
                > telescope would be a
                > > reasonable choice given that I would then only
                > require a lightweight
                > > tripod?
                > >
                >
                >
                >




                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                Do you Yahoo!?
                Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
                http://new.mail.yahoo.com
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.