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Re: Breeding for a Reason

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  • andy <andycmith@juno.com>
    Billsalak, Your argument seems to assume the questionable premise that people cannot successfully encourage others who are not their biological offspring to
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 13 10:56 AM
      Billsalak,

      Your argument seems to assume the questionable
      premise that people cannot successfully encourage
      others who are not their biological offspring to
      become educated and aware. Can any one defend that
      premise, or show me how the arqument works without
      it? Thanks.

      -andy

      --- In Why_breed@yahoogroups.com, "billsalak" <bilsalak@h...> wrote:
      > I think it's obvious to most people that voluntary human
      extinction
      > will never be a viable solution to pollution and population
      > overgrowth. This question "Why Breed?" seems to have a very simple
      > answer.
      >
      > If voluntary human extinction is not a realistic answer to the
      > problem then the solution lies in humanity.
      >
      > Let's face it, 2/3rds of the earths' human population is living in
      > conditions we would describe as poverty or near poverty level.
      These
      > people will never have the luxury of a lengthy debate on why they
      > should not procreate or have the understanding of our impending
      > ecological collapse.
      >
      > Educated people who have the time to debate issues like this are
      the
      > people who should be having children. They should be proudly
      raising
      > families who are more aware of the impact we have on the
      environment
      > than ever before. They should encourage their children to become
      > educated and use their education in developing new technologies or
      > applications of technologies that will contribute to a solution.
      >
      > When all the thoughtful educated people voluntary cease to
      reproduce
      > I can only assume that we will be left with a society that doesn't
      > value education or understand the impact of our actions on the
      world.
    • Dan <kaffeend@hotmail.com>
      ... Andy, For centuries this world has seen individuals of a truly humanitarian nature. Individuals who, sometimes in spite of themselves, strive for the
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 24 11:19 AM
        --- In Why_breed@yahoogroups.com, "andy <andycmith@j...>"
        <andycmith@j...> wrote:
        > Billsalak,
        >
        > Your argument seems to assume the questionable
        > premise that people cannot successfully encourage
        > others who are not their biological offspring to
        > become educated and aware. Can any one defend that
        > premise, or show me how the arqument works without
        > it? Thanks.
        >
        > -andy



        Andy,

        For centuries this world has seen individuals of a
        truly "humanitarian" nature. Individuals who, sometimes in spite of
        themselves, strive for the betterment of their fellows - other
        individuals and whole societies.

        Jesus, Krishna, Lao Tze and the Buddha are the examples that most
        often come to mind, though many others like Ghandi, Mother Theresa
        and Princess Diana all did the same thing. Voluntary aid workers who
        otherwise hold mundane and overlooked positions in society are also
        of this ilk.

        There will always be such individuals in our communities, and it is
        desirable that we all strive in similar ways to serve our "neighbors".

        We have the potential to become responsible participants in the
        world, and genecide is by no means the only contingency plan
        available to us. Couldn't we remove ourselves from the planet? Live
        in space and grow everything we need in off-world biospheres? That
        technology is available now, and many teams around the world are
        actively engaged in research of projects to this end.

        Sure, voluntary extinction is a viable option, but only once we have
        exhausted to other, quite accessible alternatives.

        -Dan
      • andy <andycmith@juno.com>
        Dan, You seem to be discussing an entirely different subject than I. As the name of this group suggests, the issue here is whether one should breed (in today s
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 25 7:21 PM
          Dan,

          You seem to be discussing an entirely different subject than I.
          As the name of this group suggests, the issue here is whether
          one should breed (in today's world). Perhaps if you are on the
          same topic, you could clarify for me. Thanks.

          -Andy

          --- In Why_breed@yahoogroups.com, "Dan <kaffeend@h...>"
          <kaffeend@h...> wrote:
          > --- In Why_breed@yahoogroups.com, "andy <andycmith@j...>"
          > <andycmith@j...> wrote:
          > > Billsalak,
          > >
          > > Your argument seems to assume the questionable
          > > premise that people cannot successfully encourage
          > > others who are not their biological offspring to
          > > become educated and aware. Can any one defend that
          > > premise, or show me how the arqument works without
          > > it? Thanks.
          > >
          > > -andy
          >
          >
          >
          > Andy,
          >
          > For centuries this world has seen individuals of a
          > truly "humanitarian" nature. Individuals who, sometimes in spite of
          > themselves, strive for the betterment of their fellows - other
          > individuals and whole societies.
          >
          > Jesus, Krishna, Lao Tze and the Buddha are the examples that most
          > often come to mind, though many others like Ghandi, Mother Theresa
          > and Princess Diana all did the same thing. Voluntary aid workers
          who
          > otherwise hold mundane and overlooked positions in society are also
          > of this ilk.
          > There will always be such individuals in our communities, and it is
          > desirable that we all strive in similar ways to serve
          our "neighbors".
          >
          > We have the potential to become responsible participants in the
          > world, and genecide is by no means the only contingency plan
          > available to us.
          > Couldn't we remove ourselves from the planet? Live
          > in space and grow everything we need in off-world biospheres? That
          > technology is available now, and many teams around the world are
          > actively engaged in research of projects to this end.
          >
          > Sure, voluntary extinction is a viable option, but only once we
          have
          > exhausted to other, quite accessible alternatives.
          >
          > -Dan
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