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Family size expectations diminished during times of financial stress

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  • Michael (Frish) Frishberg
    Frish Sez: My parents bugged me plenty (but not overly much) about having kids. I can t afford them I d say. They said: No one can afford them, if you wait
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 19, 2011
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      Frish Sez:
      My parents bugged me plenty (but not overly much) about having kids.
      "I can't afford them" I'd say.
      They said: "No one can afford them, if you wait til you can afford them
      you'll never have them!"
      GOOD ANSWER, I still can't afford them, and am happier everyday I avoided
      the pleasures (and anguishes) of parenthood!
      I'm happier for my non-existent offspring that is, just as proud as any
      parent, only more so!
      Some of you may know what I mean when I say: "Lowered Expectations" (SNL).

      Copied from here:
      http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/08/19/earlyshow/living/parenting/main20094545.shtml


      (CBS News)

      When men and women talk about getting married and having a family, they
      usually mean more than one child.

      But the economy is changing that for many women in their 20s and 30s.

      Many women, CBS News Correspondent Elaine Quijano reported, are scaling back
      their baby goals.

      Melissa Rheinlander told CBS News her plan was to have three children by now
      and "living the good life."

      However, instead of the gaggle of kids she expected, she now has only one
      daughter.

      Rheinlander says it's because of money. She said, "There is a lot of
      financial responsibility with having one child and honestly, I did not
      realize how expensive children can be until we had Alexandra."

      Quijano reported on "The Early Show" that Rheinlander's response is a common
      refrain among many women of child bearing age today. With the average cost
      of raising a child nearly $250,000, many women are putting their plans on
      hold.

      According to a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report, the
      jittery economy is responsible for birthrates falling to their lowest rates
      since 2007, falling into the same pattern not seen since the Great
      Depression. Today's birth rates are 65 births per 1,000 women - less than
      rates found in 1935 when birthrates were 77 per 1,000 women.

      Sarah Fowler knows this firsthand. Even though she is only 24 years old, she
      says like a lot of younger women, mapping out her future family plans
      already seem like a constant struggle.

      Fowler said, "When I was thinking about family, I really looked at my mom,
      and kind of what she did, and she had her first child when she was 26 and I
      assumed I would do the same thing."

      Her dream of already being married to her boyfriend of five years diminished
      this past year when their bills and their aspirations stopped adding up.

      Fowler said, "As a young woman, it's really difficult to find that balance
      to really strive towards having a family at a great age."

      Waiting too long can be a risk for women.

      Dr. Jacques Moritz, director of gynecology at New York's St.
      Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, told CBS News, "They might not be able to
      get pregnant, or they may need in-vitro services. ... The second thing which
      we're going to have to think about is: What is the effect of having older
      mothers with younger children?"

      For Rheinlander, she's hoping a change in the economy will come and that
      their dream family will become a reality.

      Rheinlander said, "It's unfortunate right now but I don't want to add to our
      debt and overextend ourselves."

      On "The Early Show," co-anchor Chris Wragge said, "The study did find that
      there was actually an increase of babies being born last year to women in
      their 40s."


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    • Alan
      I always roll my eyes at this talk of how expensive kids are. I have three and am working on conceiving a fourth, and we live below the federal poverty line
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 19, 2011
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        I always roll my eyes at this talk of how expensive kids are. I have three and am working on conceiving a fourth, and we live below the federal poverty line (albeit in an area with a very low cost of living: a 2BR 1BA house with a yard can be had for $30K, and I'm not even talking about a "fixer-upper"). My kids' clothes come from the Salvation Army, and they go to public school. They walk or take the bus to school; we don't even own a vehicle. But their test scores are in the 99th percentile, they are fit and at a healthy weight, and they are well adjusted because they are raised by parents who love and respect them and teach them what's really important in life (and it's not expensive material possessions or attending snobby schools or activities).

        Clothing/feeding/sheltering kids is not that expensive. Get them a library card, a used bike, and (in my tennis nut family anyway) a cheap tennis racquet to use at the public courts, and you're pretty well set.
      • Alison Bevege
        yeah you can have 4 kids cheaply but you know it is better to have 2 than 4. better for the planet and better for them in terms of the amount of time and
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 20, 2011
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          yeah you can have 4 kids cheaply
          but you know it is better to have 2 than 4. better for the planet and better for them in terms of the amount of time and attention you can give them.

          --- On Sat, 20/8/11, Alan <alankingsleythomas@...> wrote:

          From: Alan <alankingsleythomas@...>
          Subject: Why VHEMT? Re: Family size expectations diminished during times of financial stress
          To: "Why_VHEMT@yahoogroups.com" <Why_VHEMT@yahoogroups.com>
          Received: Saturday, 20 August, 2011, 3:49 PM

          I always roll my eyes at this talk of how expensive kids are. I have three and am working on conceiving a fourth, and we live below the federal poverty line (albeit in an area with a very low cost of living: a 2BR 1BA house with a yard can be had for $30K, and I'm not even talking about a "fixer-upper").  My kids' clothes come from the Salvation Army, and they go to public school.  They walk or take the bus to school; we don't even own a vehicle.  But their test scores are in the 99th percentile, they are fit and at a healthy weight, and they are well adjusted because they are raised by parents who love and respect them and teach them what's really important in life (and it's not expensive material possessions or attending snobby schools or activities). 

          Clothing/feeding/sheltering kids is not that expensive.  Get them a library card, a used bike, and (in my tennis nut family anyway) a cheap tennis racquet to use at the public courts, and you're pretty well set.

          ------------------------------------

          VHEMT Volunteers and Supporters may subscribe to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Voluntary_Human_ExtinctionYahoo! Groups Links





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Alan
          What about the attention they give each other? And what about the fact that they are bringing environmentally conscious values with them into the next
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 20, 2011
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            What about the attention they give each other? And what about the fact that they are bringing environmentally conscious values with them into the next generation? If progressives eschew childbearing and right wingers keep on being fruitful and multiplying as you know they will, that doesn't bode well for the future.

            On Aug 20, 2011, at 11:08 AM, Alison Bevege <abevege2002@...> wrote:

            > yeah you can have 4 kids cheaply
            > but you know it is better to have 2 than 4. better for the planet and better for them in terms of the amount of time and attention you can give them.
            >
            > --- On Sat, 20/8/11, Alan <alankingsleythomas@...> wrote:
            >
            > From: Alan <alankingsleythomas@...>
            > Subject: Why VHEMT? Re: Family size expectations diminished during times of financial stress
            > To: "Why_VHEMT@yahoogroups.com" <Why_VHEMT@yahoogroups.com>
            > Received: Saturday, 20 August, 2011, 3:49 PM
            >
            > I always roll my eyes at this talk of how expensive kids are. I have three and am working on conceiving a fourth, and we live below the federal poverty line (albeit in an area with a very low cost of living: a 2BR 1BA house with a yard can be had for $30K, and I'm not even talking about a "fixer-upper"). My kids' clothes come from the Salvation Army, and they go to public school. They walk or take the bus to school; we don't even own a vehicle. But their test scores are in the 99th percentile, they are fit and at a healthy weight, and they are well adjusted because they are raised by parents who love and respect them and teach them what's really important in life (and it's not expensive material possessions or attending snobby schools or activities).
            >
            > Clothing/feeding/sheltering kids is not that expensive. Get them a library card, a used bike, and (in my tennis nut family anyway) a cheap tennis racquet to use at the public courts, and you're pretty well set.
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > VHEMT Volunteers and Supporters may subscribe to http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Voluntary_Human_ExtinctionYahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Alan
            http://sierraclub.typepad.com/sierradaily/2011/08/extraterrestrials-and-global-warming.html ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 20, 2011
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