Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: life is good

Expand Messages
  • George
    My too! For the first time in ages conditions were suitable for getting to know the boat . 12 knots with stronger gusts to 20 (measured at the masthead of a
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 1, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      My too! For the first time in ages conditions were suitable for 'getting to know the boat'. 12 knots with stronger gusts to 20 (measured at the masthead of a 30ft cruiser). I sailed without the jib and without the spinnaker (which was probably a mistake). The boat was a joy to sail - never overpowered and with my 100kg on the rail the leeward float seldom touched the water let alone buried. Unalloyed pleasure sailing. Upwind in the puffs the boat was undoubtedly faster than most of those around me but on any other point of sailing she was no faster than a Laser or even a Wayfarer with two men and a dog in her and a deep reef! The Weta (without jib or spinnaker) has a sail area not much different to that of a Laser, is slightly heavier and probably has more wetted area. The sail shape is very inefficient except when sheeted in, so it is not going to be quick downwind. It is thus going to be very slow around a racecourse, particularly if the wind drops. I think you would have to carry the spinnaker/gennaker in almost all conditions to be competitive. The jib is a faff to rig, generates more string in the cockpit and is hard to control from the rail. It makes the boat significantly more prone to digging a float in, perhaps because you tend to sit in more while sheeting after a tack. On the other hand it transforms upwind and reaching performance. I intend to buy the roller version just to speed up rigging and derigging time and to give me a more variable sailplan. So: a great sail, much more confidence that I know what I am doing with the boat but a long way to go to get any racing performance out of her. Other things I noticed during my sail: a Dart 18 capsized, a Laser 2000 clocked 12.5 knots under gennaker and the kids in Laser Radials were going as fast as me most of the time, so I need to go well over 15 kts in the puffs to get competitive.I was experimenting with the 'sheet a little, steer a lot' advice earlier in this forum. There are undoubtedly some sweetspots where the boat goes a lot faster and it is important that you keep the mainsail unstalled when sailing without a jib. Weaving all over the racecourse is, however, not going to be popular with people to leeward when in close company!I believe that the bit in Rule 17 about sailing below your proper course has been repealed, but Rule 11 still applies.

      Lots to learn, but looking forward to the experience,and life is undoubtedly 'good',

      George Morris

      --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Robert Shirley <wetasocal@...> wrote:
      >
      > I had a great sail this afternoon, so I thought I would share.
      > Just checked iwindsurf.com observations and it was blowing 18 kts while I was out.  Seas were small, 1' to 2'. It seemed windier in the Harbor, so I pussed out and didn't rig the jib.  The good news is it made for an easy, relaxing sail upwind. The bad news is, at 6.5 knts I was going 1 to 1.5 knots slower that if I had been using the jib (I guestimate based on past experience).  More good news, tho, is that when I did turn downwind and unfurl the gennaker, it was really nice not having the jib to deal with. Anybody interested in racing with roller furl jibs? But I digress. I got her up over 15 knts vmg often, which is pretty good in 18 knts of wind.  
      > I had fun.  Life is good.
      > BS
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Richard Stephens
      I know most of the racing in SF bay is single-handed, but I wonder whether you guys have any experience double handed? On my Corsair, the boat feels very
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 1, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        I know most of the racing in SF bay is single-handed, but I wonder whether
        you guys have any experience double handed?

        On my Corsair, the boat feels very lively and fast when I'm single-handing,
        but that is not the fastest way around a race course.

        I've seen the Weta's SCHRS handicaps for single and double-handed, which are
        the results of a formula that I guess only takes into account the crew's
        weight. That obviously shows quite a performance hit for carrying another
        person. I'm surprised a good crew can not make up for their weight, with
        better sail trim and handling, not to mention getting their head out of the
        boat to call tactics.

        Richard.



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mitch
        Hi Richard, i ve sailed doubled up, but never in a race. That will change for the St Francis NOOD as I ll be bringing someone along. I don t know that there
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 1, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Richard,
          i've sailed doubled up, but never in a race. That will change for the St
          Francis NOOD as I'll be bringing someone along. I don't know that there
          will be much performance difference - as the guys that are winning seem to
          be the ones with the most time in the boat...
          Greg

          On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 8:43 AM, Richard Stephens <richard@...>wrote:

          >
          >
          > I know most of the racing in SF bay is single-handed, but I wonder whether
          > you guys have any experience double handed?
          >
          > On my Corsair, the boat feels very lively and fast when I'm single-handing,
          > but that is not the fastest way around a race course.
          >
          > I've seen the Weta's SCHRS handicaps for single and double-handed, which
          > are
          > the results of a formula that I guess only takes into account the crew's
          > weight. That obviously shows quite a performance hit for carrying another
          > person. I'm surprised a good crew can not make up for their weight, with
          > better sail trim and handling, not to mention getting their head out of the
          > boat to call tactics.
          >
          > Richard.
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mfcdubai
          2 up in a race with less than 10 kts is like pulling an anchor. Very embarrassing (been there) 2 up with 15-20 should be a whole different story. Forecast
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 1, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            2 up in a race with less than 10 kts is like pulling an anchor. Very embarrassing (been there)
            2 up with 15-20 should be a whole different story. Forecast conditions for friday are upto 22, and my 'crew' should be none other than Roger K!

            Report on Sat...

            Robert S (233inDXB)
            --- In , Mitch <.> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Richard,
            > i've sailed doubled up, but never in a race. That will change for the St
            > Francis NOOD as I'll be bringing someone along. I don't know that there
            > will be much performance difference - as the guys that are winning seem to
            > be the ones with the most time in the boat...
            > Greg
            >
            > On Tue, Jun 1, 2010 at 8:43 AM, Richard Stephens <.>wrote:
            >
            > >
            > >
            > > I know most of the racing in SF bay is single-handed, but I wonder whether
            > > you guys have any experience double handed?
            > >
            > > On my Corsair, the boat feels very lively and fast when I'm single-handing,
            > > but that is not the fastest way around a race course.
            > >
            > > I've seen the Weta's SCHRS handicaps for single and double-handed, which
            > > are
            > > the results of a formula that I guess only takes into account the crew's
            > > weight. That obviously shows quite a performance hit for carrying another
            > > person. I'm surprised a good crew can not make up for their weight, with
            > > better sail trim and handling, not to mention getting their head out of the
            > > boat to call tactics.
            > >
            > > Richard.
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • George
            Further to my last post about getting to know the boat in fresh but not overpowering winds, and at the risk of boring those who have never found it difficult,
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 3, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Further to my last post about getting to know the boat in fresh but not overpowering winds, and at the risk of boring those who have never found it difficult, this week we have been blessed with relatively warm winds of 10-17kts and I have progressed to using both the gennaker and the jib. That jib is one powerful sail! It is a faff to rig and reduces visibility and significantly complicates sailing the boat, but my - does she go?! I intend to buy the furling version to reduce the faff of getting the boat onto the water. The gennaker has proved to be very easy to use and in the wind strength I am describing, going downwind is relaxing compared to the Volvo 70-style fire hose ride upwind! One technique I have learned, using the 'sheet a little - steer a lot' maxim, is that when the puff hits the boat does not naturally luff up (the helm is neutral) and if you want to feather the sail you have to positively steer the boat into the wind (I am assuming the mainsheet is cleated). Another phenomenon I have observed is the extraordinary effect of apparent wind. I ran aground at speed today and feared serious mayhem, but as soon as the boat slowed, the apparent wind dropped from perhaps 2okts across the deck to about 12 and the apparent wind freed and stalled the sails. The boat became completely docile. Halving the wind does, of course, quarter the 'Q' and stalling the sail removes much of the remaining drive.

              I have invented a device to make the boat quicker to rig: a 'sprit cosy'. I leave the gennaker rigged but lower the rolled sail after use and fold it up against the sprit which I leave in situ. I pull the sailcover over the sprit which keeps off the UV and makes the sprit more visible in the hope that someone is less likely to drive into it. The sheets and furling line remain attached. In time I shall have a proper cover made.

              When I have my furling jib it will only be necessary to remove the sprit cosy and hoist the gennaker and main and I shall be on the water very quickly - no more difficult than rigging a Laser.

              George Morris,

              Wetabix










              --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "George" <wetabix0947@...> wrote:
              >
              > Me too! For the first time in ages conditions were suitable for 'getting to know the boat'. 12 knots with stronger gusts to 20 (measured at the masthead of a 30ft cruiser). I sailed without the jib and without the spinnaker (which was probably a mistake). The boat was a joy to sail - never overpowered and with my 100kg on the rail the leeward float seldom touched the water let alone buried. Unalloyed pleasure sailing. Upwind in the puffs the boat was undoubtedly faster than most of those around me but on any other point of sailing she was no faster than a Laser or even a Wayfarer with two men and a dog in her and a deep reef! The Weta (without jib or spinnaker) has a sail area not much different to that of a Laser, is slightly heavier and probably has more wetted area. The sail shape is very inefficient except when sheeted in, so it is not going to be quick downwind. It is thus going to be very slow around a racecourse, particularly if the wind drops. I think you would have to carry the spinnaker/gennaker in almost all conditions to be competitive. The jib is a faff to rig, generates more string in the cockpit and is hard to control from the rail. It makes the boat significantly more prone to digging a float in, perhaps because you tend to sit in more while sheeting after a tack. On the other hand it transforms upwind and reaching performance. I intend to buy the roller version just to speed up rigging and derigging time and to give me a more variable sailplan. So: a great sail, much more confidence that I know what I am doing with the boat but a long way to go to get any racing performance out of her. Other things I noticed during my sail: a Dart 18 capsized, a Laser 2000 clocked 12.5 knots under gennaker and the kids in Laser Radials were going as fast as me most of the time, so I need to go well over 15 kts in the puffs to get competitive.I was experimenting with the 'sheet a little, steer a lot' advice earlier in this forum. There are undoubtedly some sweetspots where the boat goes a lot faster and it is important that you keep the mainsail unstalled when sailing without a jib. Weaving all over the racecourse is, however, not going to be popular with people to leeward when in close company!I believe that the bit in Rule 17 about sailing below your proper course has been repealed, but Rule 11 still applies.
              >
              > Lots to learn, but looking forward to the experience,and life is undoubtedly 'good',
              >
              > George Morris
              >
              > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Robert Shirley <wetasocal@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I had a great sail this afternoon, so I thought I would share.
              > > Just checked iwindsurf.com observations and it was blowing 18 kts while I was out.  Seas were small, 1' to 2'. It seemed windier in the Harbor, so I pussed out and didn't rig the jib.  The good news is it made for an easy, relaxing sail upwind. The bad news is, at 6.5 knts I was going 1 to 1.5 knots slower that if I had been using the jib (I guestimate based on past experience).  More good news, tho, is that when I did turn downwind and unfurl the gennaker, it was really nice not having the jib to deal with. Anybody interested in racing with roller furl jibs? But I digress. I got her up over 15 knts vmg often, which is pretty good in 18 knts of wind.  
              > > I had fun.  Life is good.
              > > BS
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
            • eric e
              glad to hear you re getting the hang of the weta George................. yesterday i was out sailing a resort version in some very changeable conditions and
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 3, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                glad to hear you're getting the hang of the weta George.................

                yesterday i was out sailing a resort version in some very changeable conditions and upwind in the gusts it was getting quite tricky as the gusts were flicking around the forestay and backwinding the jib.............

                so i furled it and suddenly the boat became amazingly docile.
                and with only about 5 turns needed to furl the stiffer dacron jib it is much less of a hassle than the gennaker. however those same swirling gusts made tacking difficult without the jib so out it came again....................

                the jib really does have alot of effect on the how deep the leeward ama wants to go, get a big fat pocket in the jib filled with lots of wind and it can be very tricky to get that ama bow back up!.................

                had a couple of good surfs/planes under gennaker downwind where the wind catching in the gennaker collapsed the jib completely. but i love the way the boat just hops up on the plane in those situations and the steering gets ultra responsive as the forward 60% of the boat seems to come out of the water and so shorten the wheelbase?..................

                there is nothing else to really compare sailing the weta to in these conditions except the 14' solo skiffs and most of us have never tried them. certainly it behaves differently than my 28year old beachcat. no spinnaker on that and the hull forms never allow any planing.
                so due to it's uniqueness there is really no substitute to time on boat with the weta. i'm still working on my octopus ballet to hold the helm under my arm, 2 hands on the gennaker sheet and 1 of those ready to grab for the main on jib sheet across my knees..............yesterday's surprise was planing under gennaker at 13? knots with my rear foot on the hull just behind the beam socket when a wave? got through under the tramp and swept my foot of the hull, might need a foot-strap there.

                have loaded a pic of the furling jib mast slide at

                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Weta-Trimarans/photos/album/1957000026/pic/482297392/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=21&count=20&dir=asc

                and some pics of the sails furled and unfurled here

                http://wetajp.com/wp/?page_id=123


                 


                --- On Thu, 6/3/10, George <wetabix0947@...> wrote:

                From: George <wetabix0947@...>
                Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Re: life is good
                To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Thursday, June 3, 2010, 11:08 PM







                 











                Further to my last post about getting to know the boat in fresh but not overpowering winds, and at the risk of boring those who have never found it difficult, this week we have been blessed with relatively warm winds of 10-17kts and I have progressed to using both the gennaker and the jib. That jib is one powerful sail! It is a faff to rig and reduces visibility and significantly complicates sailing the boat, but my - does she go?! I intend to buy the furling version to reduce the faff of getting the boat onto the water. The gennaker has proved to be very easy to use and in the wind strength I am describing, going downwind is relaxing compared to the Volvo 70-style fire hose ride upwind! One technique I have learned, using the 'sheet a little - steer a lot' maxim, is that when the puff hits the boat does not naturally luff up (the helm is neutral) and if you want to feather the sail you have to positively steer the boat into the wind (I am assuming the
                mainsheet is cleated). Another phenomenon I have observed is the extraordinary effect of apparent wind. I ran aground at speed today and feared serious mayhem, but as soon as the boat slowed, the apparent wind dropped from perhaps 2okts across the deck to about 12 and the apparent wind freed and stalled the sails. The boat became completely docile. Halving the wind does, of course, quarter the 'Q' and stalling the sail removes much of the remaining drive.



                I have invented a device to make the boat quicker to rig: a 'sprit cosy'. I leave the gennaker rigged but lower the rolled sail after use and fold it up against the sprit which I leave in situ. I pull the sailcover over the sprit which keeps off the UV and makes the sprit more visible in the hope that someone is less likely to drive into it. The sheets and furling line remain attached. In time I shall have a proper cover made.



                When I have my furling jib it will only be necessary to remove the sprit cosy and hoist the gennaker and main and I shall be on the water very quickly - no more difficult than rigging a Laser.



                George Morris,



                Wetabix



                --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "George" <wetabix0947@...> wrote:

                >

                > Me too! For the first time in ages conditions were suitable for 'getting to know the boat'. 12 knots with stronger gusts to 20 (measured at the masthead of a 30ft cruiser). I sailed without the jib and without the spinnaker (which was probably a mistake). The boat was a joy to sail - never overpowered and with my 100kg on the rail the leeward float seldom touched the water let alone buried. Unalloyed pleasure sailing. Upwind in the puffs the boat was undoubtedly faster than most of those around me but on any other point of sailing she was no faster than a Laser or even a Wayfarer with two men and a dog in her and a deep reef! The Weta (without jib or spinnaker) has a sail area not much different to that of a Laser, is slightly heavier and probably has more wetted area. The sail shape is very inefficient except when sheeted in, so it is not going to be quick downwind. It is thus going to be very slow around a racecourse, particularly if the wind
                drops. I think you would have to carry the spinnaker/gennaker in almost all conditions to be competitive. The jib is a faff to rig, generates more string in the cockpit and is hard to control from the rail. It makes the boat significantly more prone to digging a float in, perhaps because you tend to sit in more while sheeting after a tack. On the other hand it transforms upwind and reaching performance. I intend to buy the roller version just to speed up rigging and derigging time and to give me a more variable sailplan. So: a great sail, much more confidence that I know what I am doing with the boat but a long way to go to get any racing performance out of her. Other things I noticed during my sail: a Dart 18 capsized, a Laser 2000 clocked 12.5 knots under gennaker and the kids in Laser Radials were going as fast as me most of the time, so I need to go well over 15 kts in the puffs to get competitive.I was experimenting with the 'sheet a little, steer
                a lot' advice earlier in this forum. There are undoubtedly some sweetspots where the boat goes a lot faster and it is important that you keep the mainsail unstalled when sailing without a jib. Weaving all over the racecourse is, however, not going to be popular with people to leeward when in close company!I believe that the bit in Rule 17 about sailing below your proper course has been repealed, but Rule 11 still applies.

                >

                > Lots to learn, but looking forward to the experience,and life is undoubtedly 'good',

                >

                > George Morris

                >

                > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Robert Shirley <wetasocal@> wrote:

                > >

                > > I had a great sail this afternoon, so I thought I would share.

                > > Just checked iwindsurf.com observations and it was blowing 18 kts while I was out.  Seas were small, 1' to 2'. It seemed windier in the Harbor, so I pussed out and didn't rig the jib.  The good news is it made for an easy, relaxing sail upwind. The bad news is, at 6.5 knts I was going 1 to 1.5 knots slower that if I had been using the jib (I guestimate based on past experience).  More good news, tho, is that when I did turn downwind and unfurl the gennaker, it was really nice not having the jib to deal with. Anybody interested in racing with roller furl jibs? But I digress. I got her up over 15 knts vmg often, which is pretty good in 18 knts of wind.  

                > > I had fun.  Life is good.

                > > BS

                > >

                > >

                > >

                > >

                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                > >

                >

























                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jamie Hallman Personal
                Re: i m still working on my octopus ballet to hold the helm under my arm, 2 hands on the gennaker sheet and 1 of those ready to grab for the main on jib sheet
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 4, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Re:

                  i'm still working on my octopus ballet to hold the helm under my arm, 2 hands on the gennaker sheet and 1 of those ready to grab for the main on jib sheet across my knees

                  I’m the dealer for Canada, and having done lots of demo sails with new sailors they all had a description of some version of your ballet after their test sails. I can’t take credit for this idea as it came from a local beach cat guy who took the boat out for a test sail and offered what he said was a common solution on beach cats.

                  Go to the hardware store and buy yourself a pack of self adhesive Velcro rolls. Stick a 4” long or so strip of the hard plastic hook side of the Velcro on the top of the rear akas near their outboard end. Take the softer fuzzier side and cut 2 to 3 strips long enough to encircle the padded handle of the tiller extension. You will have to align the tiller on the centerline and check out the geometry to find the right spot on the tiller handle to stick it, then remember that depending on your sail plan you might have weather helm or lee helm to deal with so add a strip on either side. By encircling the handle you can pretty much ensure the Velcro won’t pull off, I suppose you could do the same on the AKA end but I haven’t found it necessary.

                  You will hardly notice the Velcro on the handle, and when you are short a hand simply set the tiller extension on the back beam and it will stay put. I call it my dealer installed autopilot- haven’t figured out a way to charge a fortune for it after the customer sees it, so I simply put it on while I’m doing my dealer prep. Just another reason to buy your Weta from the Canadian dealer ;-)

                  BTW I echo Richard Stephens comments about a double handed Weta not being much slower than a singlehanded as you would spend more time properly trimmed, better tactics, potentially better weight distribution and righting moment in heavy stuff. You could then have two octopi on board ;-)

                  Jamie



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Robert Shirley
                  Great idea Jamie. Thank you for sharing. Velcro, DOH! It s almost as useful duct tape :-) Bob S. Go to the hardware store and buy yourself a pack of self
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 4, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Great idea Jamie. Thank you for sharing. Velcro, DOH! It's almost as useful duct tape :-)
                    Bob S.




                    Go to the hardware store and buy yourself a pack of self adhesive Velcro rolls. Stick a 4” long or so strip of the hard plastic hook side of the Velcro on the top of the rear akas near their outboard end. Take the softer fuzzier side and cut 2 to 3 strips long enough to encircle the padded handle of the tiller extension. You will have to align the tiller on the centerline and check out the geometry to find the right spot on the tiller handle to stick it, then remember that depending on your sail plan you might have weather helm or lee helm to deal with so add a strip on either side. By encircling the handle you can pretty much ensure the Velcro won’t pull off, I suppose you could do the same on the AKA end but I haven’t found it necessary.



                    You will hardly notice the Velcro on the handle, and when you are short a hand simply set the tiller extension on the back beam and it will stay put. I call it my dealer installed autopilot- haven’t figured out a way to charge a fortune for it after the customer sees it, so I simply put it on while I’m doing my dealer prep. 




















                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • mfcdubai
                    Cheaper ass solution.. Three feet of bungee, and two small D shackles (all of which are lying about somewhere!). Loop of stretch cord from main loop on the
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 7, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Cheaper ass solution..

                      Three feet of bungee, and two small D shackles (all of which are lying about somewhere!). Loop of stretch cord from main loop on the floor throuh D shackles on the sides (one thru each of the plactic loops on the hull), and then a loop to hoolk over the the tiller end. Do not tie it to anything other than itself. Loop on the tiller. acts as an autopilot to hold the tiller where you leave it. Will post a photo soon, as the words don't work. Evan Roger approved - so I am humbled :)

                      Works to prevent noobs from over-steering too...
                    • ROBERT REED
                      I tried several different things to hold the tiller, as the little cove that I have to use to launch my boat always (ALWAYS) has a head wind that likes to
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 7, 2010
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I tried several different things to hold the tiller, as the little cove that I have to use to launch my boat always (ALWAYS) has a head wind that likes to shift and it is very narrow with a private community dock on one side and overhanging trees on the other. It is effectively 50 to 75 feet wide. Generally takes 3-4 tacks to get out with a lot of paddling. Hard to do by yourself. The most difficult thing about the velcro _ ($2.59 usd at walmart) was getting the darn backing off the self-stick. Worked like a charm. Many many thanks on this one!!
                        Robert in Thomasville NC

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: mfcdubai
                        To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, June 07, 2010 1:40 PM
                        Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Re: Octopus Ballet- partial solution



                        Cheaper ass solution..

                        Three feet of bungee, and two small D shackles (all of which are lying about somewhere!). Loop of stretch cord from main loop on the floor throuh D shackles on the sides (one thru each of the plactic loops on the hull), and then a loop to hoolk over the the tiller end. Do not tie it to anything other than itself. Loop on the tiller. acts as an autopilot to hold the tiller where you leave it. Will post a photo soon, as the words don't work. Evan Roger approved - so I am humbled :)

                        Works to prevent noobs from over-steering too...





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • George
                        Can t quite picture this - did you ever post a photo? Does it restrict the amount of rudder angle available during a tack?
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jun 21, 2010
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Can't quite picture this - did you ever post a photo? Does it restrict the amount of rudder angle available during a tack?

                          --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "mfcdubai" <mfcdubai@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Cheaper ass solution..
                          >
                          > Three feet of bungee, and two small D shackles (all of which are lying about somewhere!). Loop of stretch cord from main loop on the floor throuh D shackles on the sides (one thru each of the plactic loops on the hull), and then a loop to hoolk over the the tiller end. Do not tie it to anything other than itself. Loop on the tiller. acts as an autopilot to hold the tiller where you leave it. Will post a photo soon, as the words don't work. Evan Roger approved - so I am humbled :)
                          >
                          > Works to prevent noobs from over-steering too...
                          >
                        • Robert Spencer
                          No, but I will take one tomorrow and post it. I ll be in Bonnie Scotland all next week, and will be looking out for you :) It doesn t restrict much, and
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jun 21, 2010
                          • 0 Attachment
                            No, but I will take one tomorrow and post it. I'll be in Bonnie Scotland all
                            next week, and will be looking out for you :)

                            It doesn't restrict much, and discourages stalling the rudder - will make
                            sense when you see it. Hell, I might even try to youtube it :)

                            On 21 June 2010 13:56, George <wetabix0947@...> wrote:

                            >
                            >
                            > Can't quite picture this - did you ever post a photo? Does it restrict the
                            > amount of rudder angle available during a tack?
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com <Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>,
                            > "mfcdubai" <mfcdubai@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Cheaper ass solution..
                            > >
                            > > Three feet of bungee, and two small D shackles (all of which are lying
                            > about somewhere!). Loop of stretch cord from main loop on the floor throuh D
                            > shackles on the sides (one thru each of the plactic loops on the hull), and
                            > then a loop to hoolk over the the tiller end. Do not tie it to anything
                            > other than itself. Loop on the tiller. acts as an autopilot to hold the
                            > tiller where you leave it. Will post a photo soon, as the words don't work.
                            > Evan Roger approved - so I am humbled :)
                            > >
                            > > Works to prevent noobs from over-steering too...
                            > >
                            >
                            >
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.