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Bying Used Weta

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  • yottieguy
    Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things one should look for when buying a used Weta?
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 21, 2013
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      Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things one should look for when buying a used Weta?
    • Bruce Fleming
      There s not much to worry about with a 2nd-hand Weta. These boats don t break easily. Here are just a few things I d look for: A small few rudder housings had
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 22, 2013
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        There's not much to worry about with a 2nd-hand Weta. These boats don't
        break easily. Here are just a few things I'd look for:



        A small few rudder housings had a poor connection with the carbon tube that
        makes the tiller. Make sure there's overlap of tubing material with the two
        sides that hold the rudder.



        Does the bow sprit (prod) seat firmly in the hole? Press it firmly in and
        try to sense any sogginess or crunching. I head-on crash into an immovable
        object, such as a pier/piling or dock, can damage the bulkhead at the aft
        end of the sprit. It's a lot of work to repair that, so if you sense damage
        you'll want to negotiate hard to bring down the price.



        Check the in-board ends of all four aka tubes for cracks. Most boats now
        ship with end caps, some of the early boats didn't have them. Cracked tubes
        can be mended if the cracks don't extend too far outoboard. Repair costs
        could be negotiating points for you here, too.



        Inspect the whole length of the mainsail boltrope track up the mast. If
        there are significant portions that are cracked or broken off, smoothly
        hoisting the sail will be a lot of trouble.



        Stainless steel screws that attach the tiller extension to the tiller tube
        tend to rust away and then fail without warning. Consider replacing them if
        you buy the boat, and then repeat that every couple of years.



        If the bow triangle uses stainless steel eye bolts, consider replacing with
        the altertanatives discussed in this forum. A few have failed or indidcated
        trouble brewing.



        The lower ends of the forestay and side stays have pressed bronze fittings
        that can corrode and fail, so inspect them for signs the stainless cable is
        in trouble.



        Aloha,



        Bruce Fleming

        Akahele!, #276

        San Diego, California



        From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of yottieguy
        Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2013 9:57 PM
        To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Bying Used Weta





        Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things one
        should look for when buying a used Weta?





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Richard Stephens
        I agree with Bruce, there is not much in terms of defects or wear-and-tear that cannot be easily fixed. You want to see the boat fully assembled and make sure
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 22, 2013
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          I agree with Bruce, there is not much in terms of defects or wear-and-tear
          that cannot be easily fixed.

          You want to see the boat fully assembled and make sure no parts are
          missing, and it all fits together. Look for cracks in the dolly near the
          axle, and inspect all welds on the road trailer. Make sure the two sections
          of the mast fit together with a snug fit. You can expect some dings on the
          float bows and on the daggerboard. I would carefully look inside the boat
          for signs of repair, gelcoat that doesn't quite match, etc. A good repair
          can be as good as new, but if the boat has had an accident, you want to be
          sure it has been properly repaired. Look for broken battens in the jib
          (which are actually a pain to replace...). Also, if the beam supporting the
          top rudder gudgeon has been stepped on, or has been used to lift the boat,
          you may find cracks there. Turn the boat over and look for cracks
          around/inside the daggerboard case. Hairline cracks in the gelcoat don't
          indicate there is a structural proble, and may be nothing to worry about.
          In fact nothing I've mentioned really affects the sailability or
          competitive performance of the boat. They really are pretty bullet proof.

          Richard.


          On Mon, Apr 22, 2013 at 7:37 PM, Bruce Fleming <wavejump@...>wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > There's not much to worry about with a 2nd-hand Weta. These boats don't
          > break easily. Here are just a few things I'd look for:
          >
          > A small few rudder housings had a poor connection with the carbon tube that
          > makes the tiller. Make sure there's overlap of tubing material with the two
          > sides that hold the rudder.
          >
          > Does the bow sprit (prod) seat firmly in the hole? Press it firmly in and
          > try to sense any sogginess or crunching. I head-on crash into an immovable
          > object, such as a pier/piling or dock, can damage the bulkhead at the aft
          > end of the sprit. It's a lot of work to repair that, so if you sense damage
          > you'll want to negotiate hard to bring down the price.
          >
          > Check the in-board ends of all four aka tubes for cracks. Most boats now
          > ship with end caps, some of the early boats didn't have them. Cracked tubes
          > can be mended if the cracks don't extend too far outoboard. Repair costs
          > could be negotiating points for you here, too.
          >
          > Inspect the whole length of the mainsail boltrope track up the mast. If
          > there are significant portions that are cracked or broken off, smoothly
          > hoisting the sail will be a lot of trouble.
          >
          > Stainless steel screws that attach the tiller extension to the tiller tube
          > tend to rust away and then fail without warning. Consider replacing them if
          > you buy the boat, and then repeat that every couple of years.
          >
          > If the bow triangle uses stainless steel eye bolts, consider replacing with
          > the altertanatives discussed in this forum. A few have failed or indidcated
          > trouble brewing.
          >
          > The lower ends of the forestay and side stays have pressed bronze fittings
          > that can corrode and fail, so inspect them for signs the stainless cable is
          > in trouble.
          >
          > Aloha,
          >
          > Bruce Fleming
          >
          > Akahele!, #276
          >
          > San Diego, California
          >
          > From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
          > Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com]
          > On Behalf Of yottieguy
          > Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2013 9:57 PM
          > To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Bying Used Weta
          >
          >
          > Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things
          > one
          > should look for when buying a used Weta?
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • bjarthur123
          other things to consider include: 1. does it have the new upgraded foils or the old original ones? 2. new continuous furling gennaker drum or the old
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 23, 2013
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            other things to consider include:

            1. does it have the new upgraded foils or the old original ones?

            2. new continuous furling gennaker drum or the old non-continuous one?

            3. in addition to checking that the the inboard ends of the beams have plastic plugs, check that the mast and gennaker pole have these too

            these first three items are easily bought from a weta dealer.


            4. does it have an access hatch into the main hull between the dagger board and mast step? older boats did not. it is quite handy to store stuff there!

            5. have there been any non-standard holes drilled in the boat, for an altered main sheet setup for example or flipping the trampoline blocks around backwards.


            it is difficult to criticize such an excellent boat, as the build quality is in general excellent, but there a few other things of note:

            6. a handful of boats were accidentally built with the orientation of the carbon fiber in the beams layed out incorrectly. cracks formed despite the plastic end plugs because only 30% of the fibers ran longitudinally instead of 70%. simple to fix with a kit from weta marine that involves epoxying an internal reinforcement tube.

            7. the 10mm thick gelcoat around the 90-degree elbow/knee of the beams also tends to crack. if you see cracks there, forcefully wiggle that joint with all your strength. if there is no movement, then the carbon/epoxy underneath are fine and you have no worries.

            8. none of the used boats are so old yet that much galvanic corrosion will be present. but having owned a 20-year old hobie 18 once and i wonder sometimes how wetas will compare in this regard. stainless steel on carbon will corrode, as evidenced by the tiller extension. what about the shroud hounds? the rivets for the jib and gennaker halyard turning blocks? the rivets into the sprit for the gennaker tack? are the backing plates for the jib sheet blocks and tramp blocks aluminum or stainless? if the former, we'll have problems in years to come.

            9. rig the boat with a neutral mast rake and take the boat out for a sail. does it like to turn left? that is, on starboard tack or gybe does it have lee helm, and port it has weather helm? mine does, and i think it's because the port float is bow down with respect to the starboard one. all boats i have ever seen have this asymmetry.

            ben, #358
            chesapeake



            --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "yottieguy" <pewit@...> wrote:
            >
            > Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things one should look for when buying a used Weta?
            >
          • yottieguy
            Thanks all for your suggestions - unfortunately the boat I was looking at may be sold, so now I have to save up for a new one. Also the difference in the
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 23, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks all for your suggestions - unfortunately the boat I was looking at may be sold, so now I have to save up for a new one.

              Also the difference in the advertised price for the used boat and a new boat wasn't that great, apart from the road trailer included, but the used boat was over 800 miles/1400knms away so shipping costs added considerably to the expense not to mention the risk of buying it unseen.

              I can recommend Uship.com for finding inexpensive shipping/towing providers - the specialist boat transport companies were prohibitively expensive.

              --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Richard Stephens <richard@...> wrote:
              >
              > I agree with Bruce, there is not much in terms of defects or wear-and-tear
              > that cannot be easily fixed.
              >
              > You want to see the boat fully assembled and make sure no parts are
              > missing, and it all fits together. Look for cracks in the dolly near the
              > axle, and inspect all welds on the road trailer. Make sure the two sections
              > of the mast fit together with a snug fit. You can expect some dings on the
              > float bows and on the daggerboard. I would carefully look inside the boat
              > for signs of repair, gelcoat that doesn't quite match, etc. A good repair
              > can be as good as new, but if the boat has had an accident, you want to be
              > sure it has been properly repaired. Look for broken battens in the jib
              > (which are actually a pain to replace...). Also, if the beam supporting the
              > top rudder gudgeon has been stepped on, or has been used to lift the boat,
              > you may find cracks there. Turn the boat over and look for cracks
              > around/inside the daggerboard case. Hairline cracks in the gelcoat don't
              > indicate there is a structural proble, and may be nothing to worry about.
              > In fact nothing I've mentioned really affects the sailability or
              > competitive performance of the boat. They really are pretty bullet proof.
              >
              > Richard.
              >
              >
              > On Mon, Apr 22, 2013 at 7:37 PM, Bruce Fleming <wavejump@...>wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > > There's not much to worry about with a 2nd-hand Weta. These boats don't
              > > break easily. Here are just a few things I'd look for:
              > >
              > > A small few rudder housings had a poor connection with the carbon tube that
              > > makes the tiller. Make sure there's overlap of tubing material with the two
              > > sides that hold the rudder.
              > >
              > > Does the bow sprit (prod) seat firmly in the hole? Press it firmly in and
              > > try to sense any sogginess or crunching. I head-on crash into an immovable
              > > object, such as a pier/piling or dock, can damage the bulkhead at the aft
              > > end of the sprit. It's a lot of work to repair that, so if you sense damage
              > > you'll want to negotiate hard to bring down the price.
              > >
              > > Check the in-board ends of all four aka tubes for cracks. Most boats now
              > > ship with end caps, some of the early boats didn't have them. Cracked tubes
              > > can be mended if the cracks don't extend too far outoboard. Repair costs
              > > could be negotiating points for you here, too.
              > >
              > > Inspect the whole length of the mainsail boltrope track up the mast. If
              > > there are significant portions that are cracked or broken off, smoothly
              > > hoisting the sail will be a lot of trouble.
              > >
              > > Stainless steel screws that attach the tiller extension to the tiller tube
              > > tend to rust away and then fail without warning. Consider replacing them if
              > > you buy the boat, and then repeat that every couple of years.
              > >
              > > If the bow triangle uses stainless steel eye bolts, consider replacing with
              > > the altertanatives discussed in this forum. A few have failed or indidcated
              > > trouble brewing.
              > >
              > > The lower ends of the forestay and side stays have pressed bronze fittings
              > > that can corrode and fail, so inspect them for signs the stainless cable is
              > > in trouble.
              > >
              > > Aloha,
              > >
              > > Bruce Fleming
              > >
              > > Akahele!, #276
              > >
              > > San Diego, California
              > >
              > > From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [mailto:
              > > Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com]
              > > On Behalf Of yottieguy
              > > Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2013 9:57 PM
              > > To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
              > > Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Bying Used Weta
              > >
              > >
              > > Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things
              > > one
              > > should look for when buying a used Weta?
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Stephen Galey
              Where are you? I ve got a good used boat for sale, all up to date equipment with trailer, $9,500 and I can possibly deliver, at least part way.
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 23, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Where are you? I've got a good used boat for sale, all up to date equipment with trailer, $9,500 and I can possibly deliver, at least part way. sgaley@....
                ________________________________
                From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of yottieguy [pewit@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 6:13 AM
                To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Re: Bying Used Weta



                Thanks all for your suggestions - unfortunately the boat I was looking at may be sold, so now I have to save up for a new one.

                Also the difference in the advertised price for the used boat and a new boat wasn't that great, apart from the road trailer included, but the used boat was over 800 miles/1400knms away so shipping costs added considerably to the expense not to mention the risk of buying it unseen.

                I can recommend Uship.com for finding inexpensive shipping/towing providers - the specialist boat transport companies were prohibitively expensive.

                --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>, Richard Stephens <richard@...> wrote:
                >
                > I agree with Bruce, there is not much in terms of defects or wear-and-tear
                > that cannot be easily fixed.
                >
                > You want to see the boat fully assembled and make sure no parts are
                > missing, and it all fits together. Look for cracks in the dolly near the
                > axle, and inspect all welds on the road trailer. Make sure the two sections
                > of the mast fit together with a snug fit. You can expect some dings on the
                > float bows and on the daggerboard. I would carefully look inside the boat
                > for signs of repair, gelcoat that doesn't quite match, etc. A good repair
                > can be as good as new, but if the boat has had an accident, you want to be
                > sure it has been properly repaired. Look for broken battens in the jib
                > (which are actually a pain to replace...). Also, if the beam supporting the
                > top rudder gudgeon has been stepped on, or has been used to lift the boat,
                > you may find cracks there. Turn the boat over and look for cracks
                > around/inside the daggerboard case. Hairline cracks in the gelcoat don't
                > indicate there is a structural proble, and may be nothing to worry about.
                > In fact nothing I've mentioned really affects the sailability or
                > competitive performance of the boat. They really are pretty bullet proof.
                >
                > Richard.
                >
                >
                > On Mon, Apr 22, 2013 at 7:37 PM, Bruce Fleming <wavejump@...>wrote:
                >
                > > **
                > >
                > >
                > > There's not much to worry about with a 2nd-hand Weta. These boats don't
                > > break easily. Here are just a few things I'd look for:
                > >
                > > A small few rudder housings had a poor connection with the carbon tube that
                > > makes the tiller. Make sure there's overlap of tubing material with the two
                > > sides that hold the rudder.
                > >
                > > Does the bow sprit (prod) seat firmly in the hole? Press it firmly in and
                > > try to sense any sogginess or crunching. I head-on crash into an immovable
                > > object, such as a pier/piling or dock, can damage the bulkhead at the aft
                > > end of the sprit. It's a lot of work to repair that, so if you sense damage
                > > you'll want to negotiate hard to bring down the price.
                > >
                > > Check the in-board ends of all four aka tubes for cracks. Most boats now
                > > ship with end caps, some of the early boats didn't have them. Cracked tubes
                > > can be mended if the cracks don't extend too far outoboard. Repair costs
                > > could be negotiating points for you here, too.
                > >
                > > Inspect the whole length of the mainsail boltrope track up the mast. If
                > > there are significant portions that are cracked or broken off, smoothly
                > > hoisting the sail will be a lot of trouble.
                > >
                > > Stainless steel screws that attach the tiller extension to the tiller tube
                > > tend to rust away and then fail without warning. Consider replacing them if
                > > you buy the boat, and then repeat that every couple of years.
                > >
                > > If the bow triangle uses stainless steel eye bolts, consider replacing with
                > > the altertanatives discussed in this forum. A few have failed or indidcated
                > > trouble brewing.
                > >
                > > The lower ends of the forestay and side stays have pressed bronze fittings
                > > that can corrode and fail, so inspect them for signs the stainless cable is
                > > in trouble.
                > >
                > > Aloha,
                > >
                > > Bruce Fleming
                > >
                > > Akahele!, #276
                > >
                > > San Diego, California
                > >
                > > From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
                > > Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>]
                > > On Behalf Of yottieguy
                > > Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2013 9:57 PM
                > > To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>
                > > Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Bying Used Weta
                > >
                > >
                > > Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things
                > > one
                > > should look for when buying a used Weta?
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Stephen Galey
                Oh, and I m in Seattle. Sent from my iPhone
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 23, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Oh, and I'm in Seattle.

                  Sent from my iPhone

                  On Apr 23, 2013, at 9:55 AM, "Stephen Galey" <sgaley@...> wrote:

                  > Where are you? I've got a good used boat for sale, all up to date equipment with trailer, $9,500 and I can possibly deliver, at least part way. sgaley@....
                  > ________________________________
                  > From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of yottieguy [pewit@...]
                  > Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 6:13 AM
                  > To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Re: Bying Used Weta
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Thanks all for your suggestions - unfortunately the boat I was looking at may be sold, so now I have to save up for a new one.
                  >
                  > Also the difference in the advertised price for the used boat and a new boat wasn't that great, apart from the road trailer included, but the used boat was over 800 miles/1400knms away so shipping costs added considerably to the expense not to mention the risk of buying it unseen.
                  >
                  > I can recommend Uship.com for finding inexpensive shipping/towing providers - the specialist boat transport companies were prohibitively expensive.
                  >
                  > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>, Richard Stephens <richard@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> I agree with Bruce, there is not much in terms of defects or wear-and-tear
                  >> that cannot be easily fixed.
                  >>
                  >> You want to see the boat fully assembled and make sure no parts are
                  >> missing, and it all fits together. Look for cracks in the dolly near the
                  >> axle, and inspect all welds on the road trailer. Make sure the two sections
                  >> of the mast fit together with a snug fit. You can expect some dings on the
                  >> float bows and on the daggerboard. I would carefully look inside the boat
                  >> for signs of repair, gelcoat that doesn't quite match, etc. A good repair
                  >> can be as good as new, but if the boat has had an accident, you want to be
                  >> sure it has been properly repaired. Look for broken battens in the jib
                  >> (which are actually a pain to replace...). Also, if the beam supporting the
                  >> top rudder gudgeon has been stepped on, or has been used to lift the boat,
                  >> you may find cracks there. Turn the boat over and look for cracks
                  >> around/inside the daggerboard case. Hairline cracks in the gelcoat don't
                  >> indicate there is a structural proble, and may be nothing to worry about.
                  >> In fact nothing I've mentioned really affects the sailability or
                  >> competitive performance of the boat. They really are pretty bullet proof.
                  >>
                  >> Richard.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> On Mon, Apr 22, 2013 at 7:37 PM, Bruce Fleming <wavejump@...>wrote:
                  >>
                  >>> **
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> There's not much to worry about with a 2nd-hand Weta. These boats don't
                  >>> break easily. Here are just a few things I'd look for:
                  >>>
                  >>> A small few rudder housings had a poor connection with the carbon tube that
                  >>> makes the tiller. Make sure there's overlap of tubing material with the two
                  >>> sides that hold the rudder.
                  >>>
                  >>> Does the bow sprit (prod) seat firmly in the hole? Press it firmly in and
                  >>> try to sense any sogginess or crunching. I head-on crash into an immovable
                  >>> object, such as a pier/piling or dock, can damage the bulkhead at the aft
                  >>> end of the sprit. It's a lot of work to repair that, so if you sense damage
                  >>> you'll want to negotiate hard to bring down the price.
                  >>>
                  >>> Check the in-board ends of all four aka tubes for cracks. Most boats now
                  >>> ship with end caps, some of the early boats didn't have them. Cracked tubes
                  >>> can be mended if the cracks don't extend too far outoboard. Repair costs
                  >>> could be negotiating points for you here, too.
                  >>>
                  >>> Inspect the whole length of the mainsail boltrope track up the mast. If
                  >>> there are significant portions that are cracked or broken off, smoothly
                  >>> hoisting the sail will be a lot of trouble.
                  >>>
                  >>> Stainless steel screws that attach the tiller extension to the tiller tube
                  >>> tend to rust away and then fail without warning. Consider replacing them if
                  >>> you buy the boat, and then repeat that every couple of years.
                  >>>
                  >>> If the bow triangle uses stainless steel eye bolts, consider replacing with
                  >>> the altertanatives discussed in this forum. A few have failed or indidcated
                  >>> trouble brewing.
                  >>>
                  >>> The lower ends of the forestay and side stays have pressed bronze fittings
                  >>> that can corrode and fail, so inspect them for signs the stainless cable is
                  >>> in trouble.
                  >>>
                  >>> Aloha,
                  >>>
                  >>> Bruce Fleming
                  >>>
                  >>> Akahele!, #276
                  >>>
                  >>> San Diego, California
                  >>>
                  >>> From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
                  >>> Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>]
                  >>> On Behalf Of yottieguy
                  >>> Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2013 9:57 PM
                  >>> To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>
                  >>> Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Bying Used Weta
                  >>>
                  >>>
                  >>> Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things
                  >>> one
                  >>> should look for when buying a used Weta?
                  >>>
                  >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • bcsiegfried
                  Heck, I drove 550 miles one way to buy a new Weta. My son and I made a trip of it ad had a little sail on the dealer s Weta. I bought my first dinghy without
                  Message 8 of 8 , May 2, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Heck, I drove 550 miles one way to buy a new Weta. My son and I made a trip of it ad had a little sail on the dealer's Weta. I bought my first dinghy without sailing one first, which I ended up feeling was a mistake...



                    --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Galey <sgaley@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Where are you? I've got a good used boat for sale, all up to date equipment with trailer, $9,500 and I can possibly deliver, at least part way. sgaley@...
                    > ________________________________
                    > From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of yottieguy [pewit@...]
                    > Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 6:13 AM
                    > To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Re: Bying Used Weta
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Thanks all for your suggestions - unfortunately the boat I was looking at may be sold, so now I have to save up for a new one.
                    >
                    > Also the difference in the advertised price for the used boat and a new boat wasn't that great, apart from the road trailer included, but the used boat was over 800 miles/1400knms away so shipping costs added considerably to the expense not to mention the risk of buying it unseen.
                    >
                    > I can recommend Uship.com for finding inexpensive shipping/towing providers - the specialist boat transport companies were prohibitively expensive.
                    >
                    > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>, Richard Stephens <richard@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I agree with Bruce, there is not much in terms of defects or wear-and-tear
                    > > that cannot be easily fixed.
                    > >
                    > > You want to see the boat fully assembled and make sure no parts are
                    > > missing, and it all fits together. Look for cracks in the dolly near the
                    > > axle, and inspect all welds on the road trailer. Make sure the two sections
                    > > of the mast fit together with a snug fit. You can expect some dings on the
                    > > float bows and on the daggerboard. I would carefully look inside the boat
                    > > for signs of repair, gelcoat that doesn't quite match, etc. A good repair
                    > > can be as good as new, but if the boat has had an accident, you want to be
                    > > sure it has been properly repaired. Look for broken battens in the jib
                    > > (which are actually a pain to replace...). Also, if the beam supporting the
                    > > top rudder gudgeon has been stepped on, or has been used to lift the boat,
                    > > you may find cracks there. Turn the boat over and look for cracks
                    > > around/inside the daggerboard case. Hairline cracks in the gelcoat don't
                    > > indicate there is a structural proble, and may be nothing to worry about.
                    > > In fact nothing I've mentioned really affects the sailability or
                    > > competitive performance of the boat. They really are pretty bullet proof.
                    > >
                    > > Richard.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > On Mon, Apr 22, 2013 at 7:37 PM, Bruce Fleming <wavejump@>wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > **
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > There's not much to worry about with a 2nd-hand Weta. These boats don't
                    > > > break easily. Here are just a few things I'd look for:
                    > > >
                    > > > A small few rudder housings had a poor connection with the carbon tube that
                    > > > makes the tiller. Make sure there's overlap of tubing material with the two
                    > > > sides that hold the rudder.
                    > > >
                    > > > Does the bow sprit (prod) seat firmly in the hole? Press it firmly in and
                    > > > try to sense any sogginess or crunching. I head-on crash into an immovable
                    > > > object, such as a pier/piling or dock, can damage the bulkhead at the aft
                    > > > end of the sprit. It's a lot of work to repair that, so if you sense damage
                    > > > you'll want to negotiate hard to bring down the price.
                    > > >
                    > > > Check the in-board ends of all four aka tubes for cracks. Most boats now
                    > > > ship with end caps, some of the early boats didn't have them. Cracked tubes
                    > > > can be mended if the cracks don't extend too far outoboard. Repair costs
                    > > > could be negotiating points for you here, too.
                    > > >
                    > > > Inspect the whole length of the mainsail boltrope track up the mast. If
                    > > > there are significant portions that are cracked or broken off, smoothly
                    > > > hoisting the sail will be a lot of trouble.
                    > > >
                    > > > Stainless steel screws that attach the tiller extension to the tiller tube
                    > > > tend to rust away and then fail without warning. Consider replacing them if
                    > > > you buy the boat, and then repeat that every couple of years.
                    > > >
                    > > > If the bow triangle uses stainless steel eye bolts, consider replacing with
                    > > > the altertanatives discussed in this forum. A few have failed or indidcated
                    > > > trouble brewing.
                    > > >
                    > > > The lower ends of the forestay and side stays have pressed bronze fittings
                    > > > that can corrode and fail, so inspect them for signs the stainless cable is
                    > > > in trouble.
                    > > >
                    > > > Aloha,
                    > > >
                    > > > Bruce Fleming
                    > > >
                    > > > Akahele!, #276
                    > > >
                    > > > San Diego, California
                    > > >
                    > > > From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
                    > > > Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>]
                    > > > On Behalf Of yottieguy
                    > > > Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2013 9:57 PM
                    > > > To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com<mailto:Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>
                    > > > Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Bying Used Weta
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > > Apart from scratches on the hull and amas, are there any specific things
                    > > > one
                    > > > should look for when buying a used Weta?
                    > > >
                    > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                    >
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                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
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