Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Racing in very light wind

Expand Messages
  • George
    Last night I was beaten (on the water) by a Laser Radial and for a while I was cross tacking with a couple of Fevas. Desperate situations require desperate
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 13, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Last night I was beaten (on the water) by a Laser Radial and for a while I was cross tacking with a couple of Fevas. Desperate situations require desperate measures. One solution might be not to race in light winds but that seems a bit extreme - the wind was about 6 knots which is a perfectly adequate sailing breeze for most boats. Question 1. Has anyone actually tried sailing wing and wing (goosewinged) downwind in controlled circumstances and does it work?

      Question 2. When going downwind in light wind with the apparent wind just aft of the beam, should the mainsail tell-tales be flying?

      Question 3. Going to windward. The boat is much quicker through the water if you sail free, but you do lose an awful lot of height to (say) an RS200. Should you, in fact pinch?

      Question 4. How do you set the mainsail in these conditions - there is quite a wide range of settings where the tell-tales will fly. Do you sheet in hard to 'power up the leech' or do you free off to allow the top of the sail to 'breathe' and to angle the lift vector forward? Do you use the forward or aftmost clew hole?

      Or is sailing just a mystery which some people have solved and others haven't and never will?.

      For what it is worth I regard 4-8 knots as the boat's worst wind range when racing against monohull dinghies on a windward/leeward course. In ghosting conditions the boat goes quite well, then, as the wind rises into the death zone other boats start to go better; then, at 8 knots the Weta starts to go deeper downwind and quicker upwind until at about 12 knots she actually starts to overhaul other boats going upwind.



      Rgds

      George
    • eric e
      ... yes, but a well sailed, heeled, standard laser is faster, as without mast stays they can get their sail better positioned to catch the wind... ... in real
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 13, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        > Question 1. Has anyone actually tried sailing wing and wing (goosewinged) downwind in controlled circumstances and does it work?

        yes, but a well sailed, heeled, standard laser is faster, as without mast stays they can get their sail better positioned to catch the wind...

        >Question 2. When going downwind in light wind with the apparent wind just aft of the beam, should the mainsail tell-tales be flying?

        in real light winds the tell-tales are next to useless

        >Question 3. Going to windward. The boat is much quicker through the water if you sail free, but you do lose an awful lot of height to (say) an RS200. Should you, in fact pinch?

        people say to let a multi run and make better vmg...maybe if your legs are kilometers long, but i've always found i get better vmg pinching but i never get to sail 1000mtr+ upwind legs

        >Question 4. How do you set the mainsail in these conditions - there is quite a wide range of settings where the tell-tales will fly. Do you sheet in hard to 'power up the leech' or do you free off to allow the top of the sail to 'breathe' and to angle the lift vector forward? Do you use the forward or aftmost clew hole?

        a lot of variables, in theory the back leech holes for light winds, i find body positioning more important than sail settling...getting as far forward as needed to lift the sucky transom clear, and trying to have zero ama wakes

        For what it is worth I regard 4-8 knots as the boat's worst wind range when racing against monohull dinghies on a windward/leeward course. In ghosting conditions the boat goes quite well, then, as the wind rises into the death zone other boats start to go better; then, at 8 knots the Weta starts to go deeper downwind and quicker upwind until at about 12 knots she actually starts to overhaul other boats going upwind.



        Rgds



        George
      • Tim Corcoran
        On question 1, goosewinging. One technique I ve used when the conditions makes it easier to fetch a leeward mark going dead downwind for at least a little
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 14, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          On question 1, goosewinging. One technique I've used when the conditions makes it easier to fetch a leeward mark going dead downwind for at least a little bit is to goosewing the jib. This is easier and faster than goosewinging the screecher, and it fills the screecher nicely. Hence I think you still have air moving over the back of the main and you don't have to swing it way out to the stay working in pure drag mode. I prefer the broad reach going downwind, but use this method in a pinch because it's quick. Opinions vary--at the recent Huntington Lake regatta, a couple boats were gossewinging the screecher under light air conditions.

          --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, eric e <ericeaso@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Question 1. Has anyone actually tried sailing wing and wing (goosewinged) downwind in controlled circumstances and does it work?
          >
          > yes, but a well sailed, heeled, standard laser is faster, as without mast stays they can get their sail better positioned to catch the wind...
          >
          > >Question 2. When going downwind in light wind with the apparent wind just aft of the beam, should the mainsail tell-tales be flying?
          >
          > in real light winds the tell-tales are next to useless
          >
          > >Question 3. Going to windward. The boat is much quicker through the water if you sail free, but you do lose an awful lot of height to (say) an RS200. Should you, in fact pinch?
          >
          > people say to let a multi run and make better vmg...maybe if your legs are kilometers long, but i've always found i get better vmg pinching but i never get to sail 1000mtr+ upwind legs
          >
          > >Question 4. How do you set the mainsail in these conditions - there is quite a wide range of settings where the tell-tales will fly. Do you sheet in hard to 'power up the leech' or do you free off to allow the top of the sail to 'breathe' and to angle the lift vector forward? Do you use the forward or aftmost clew hole?
          >
          > a lot of variables, in theory the back leech holes for light winds, i find body positioning more important than sail settling...getting as far forward as needed to lift the sucky transom clear, and trying to have zero ama wakes
          >
          > For what it is worth I regard 4-8 knots as the boat's worst wind range when racing against monohull dinghies on a windward/leeward course. In ghosting conditions the boat goes quite well, then, as the wind rises into the death zone other boats start to go better; then, at 8 knots the Weta starts to go deeper downwind and quicker upwind until at about 12 knots she actually starts to overhaul other boats going upwind.
          >
          >
          >
          > Rgds
          >
          >
          >
          > George
          >
        • Ed
          What is the best way to reseal the hatch on an ama? To find the leak, with my Weta on the dock, I put water in the left ama an closed the hatch. Water readily
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 6, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            What is the best way to reseal the hatch on an ama?



            To find the leak, with my Weta on the dock, I put water in the left ama an
            closed the hatch. Water readily leaks out of the seal on the hatch. The
            cover fits the hatch and the cover seal is not the problem.



            Are there any tricks about removing and resealing the hatch? Any special
            kind of seal recommended?



            Thanks,



            Ed



            Weta #273



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Robert Spencer
            Remove and replace - the whole lot - its cheap to do and you ll get another three years from a new set. The originals seem to go brittle after a couple of
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 6, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Remove and replace - the whole lot - its cheap to do and you'll get another three years from a new set. The originals seem to go brittle after a couple of years, so even if you remove carefully, it will only be trouble sooner rather than later. Bed on 3m 5200 or MSP 190 - no screws needed - unless you have one for the tether. Hatches should be standard 4".
              I've done 3 boats so far here - but it gets to 125' here during the day - and that's HOT!!
              Regards
              Robert

              Sent from iPhone (probably without my reading glasses, so please excuse any bizarre word replacements that I did not see!)

              On 6 Aug 2012, at 19:54, "Ed" <ed@...> wrote:

              What is the best way to reseal the hatch on an ama?

              To find the leak, with my Weta on the dock, I put water in the left ama an
              closed the hatch. Water readily leaks out of the seal on the hatch. The
              cover fits the hatch and the cover seal is not the problem.

              Are there any tricks about removing and resealing the hatch? Any special
              kind of seal recommended?

              Thanks,

              Ed

              Weta #273

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ira Heller
              NEVER use 5200 unless you want something rather permanently installed. 4200 is more than adequate for this application.
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 6, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                NEVER use 5200 unless you want something rather permanently
                installed. 4200 is more than adequate for this application.


                At 01:53 PM 8/6/2012, you wrote:

                >Remove and replace - the whole lot - its cheap to do and you'll get
                >another three years from a new set. The originals seem to go brittle
                >after a couple of years, so even if you remove carefully, it will
                >only be trouble sooner rather than later. Bed on 3m 5200 or MSP 190
                >- no screws needed - unless you have one for the tether. Hatches
                >should be standard 4".
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.