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Weta Reviews

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  • wetabob
    Hey Weta people, we would love to here your impressions of the Weta. Here s a quick review reprinted from Sailing Anarchy Dinghy Forum, April 8,2008, by bhyde
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25, 2008
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      Hey Weta people, we would love to here your impressions of the Weta.
      Here's a quick review reprinted from Sailing Anarchy Dinghy Forum,
      April 8,2008, by bhyde (aka wetabob)...

      Flew to Florida last week to hang with the family in Clearwater. One
      of the first owners of a Weta, Rick, sails the boat on a regular
      basis (like three times a week) about a mile from where I'm staying
      (The Causeway). He was nice enough to let me take the boat out for a
      quick test ride – he clearly has no idea how many boats I've
      destroyed.

      The weather was perfect. When Rick and I meet down at the beach the
      wind was about 12kts coming directly onshore. We unloaded the boat
      from his road trailer and started rigging it up. If I hadn't been
      asking all sorts of stupid questions and otherwise slowing the whole
      process down, it would have taken about 20 minutes to rig everything
      up. Except for attaching the jib, main and screacher halyards and
      forestay to the two-piece mast, everything is basically attached to
      the boat and ready to go. Slide the ama assembly in place, put the
      mast on and throw up the sails. It's about that easy and none of the
      assembly requires any real manly strength. The amas are light and
      balance easily. Having no boom eliminates a lot of work since all the
      junk associated with it just isn't there.

      Good thing too. By the time we got the mast on the wind had picked up
      to a solid 15 – 18kts with gusts in the low 20's making boat handling
      a little tricky. Hey why are all the Hobiecat guys coming in?
      We had a little trouble put the screacher on in the building wind,
      and since the wind angle and channel layout was going to make any
      real long runs impossible, we went with the jib and main alone.

      We pushed the boat off the dolly and dragged into water deep enough
      to get the rudder and daggerboard down. Even in the building breeze
      the boat is light enough to push around easily. Rick jumped on and
      took the tiller and I hopped on and took the jib sheets. Trim on and
      off we went upwind. The main was a little overpowered so we cranked
      in some downhaul and the main got nice and flat. Upwind the boat is
      rock stable. With a little bit of weather weight, not hiking
      aggressively, it sails flat with the leeward ama just lightly loaded.
      I never felt like the ama's were digging or slowing the boat down in
      bigger waves.

      I took the tiller and we did a couple of tacks to work our way away
      from the beach. That single tiller extension behind the main sheet is
      something I didn't like. It takes a little practice to get use to it
      and make clean tacks. If you were racing all the time, a double
      extension would be much better. The mainsheet cheating system is
      simple and functional, but again, some minor mods would be required
      for racing.

      Rick' gps showed that we were going between 7 and 9kts uphill and
      about 6.5 to 7 in maximum point mode. Not bad for a 14 foot boat.
      Once we got enough room to play around, I bore away to a close reach
      and watched the speed come up to about 12. Bearing farther away to a
      board reach (90 to 120 degrees) the boat was consistently in the mid
      teens (12 – 15 most of the time). We hit 16.5 max for the day (main
      and jib, two people) and I'm sure with the screacher we could have
      worked into the high teens or maybe the low twenties.
      Capsize? Not even close. On one run down the channel going about 14 I
      found some nice confused waves mixed together with a big powerboat
      wake and some big pressure. This would be pretty typical stuff for SF
      Bay sailing on South Hampton Shoal in mid summer. The boat just
      slammed though the waves and keep going. With two people on the boat,
      and weight to the back of the bus, you can just keep the pedal down.
      A couple of times in big 25+ gusts the nose started to go in, but a
      quick ease on the main or an aggressive bear away brought it right
      back. You would have to be seriously retarded to capsize this thing
      in anything less than 25. Without a boom the main leech is pretty
      open to begin with and a big ease on the mainsheet just vents the
      entire upper half of the sail. Anyone with small high-performance
      boat experience is going to love the heavy air handling of the Weta.
      Rock steady.

      There is quite a bit of stray generated by the bow in blasting
      conditions, and that spray hits you squarely in the face making
      vision a bit of a problem. I used Rick as a Human Shield when things
      got blurry. A small stray skirt from the bow to the ama would be nice
      for big air days in cold water.

      After an hour or so we called it quits since Rick had to get home. We
      took the boat apart and loaded it on the road trailer. 10 minutes and
      done. Here's something weird – I wasn't even remotely tired. If I had
      been on an I14 or something like that I probably wouldn't have even
      left the dock in those conditions. If I had, it would have been a
      completely ass kicking and guaranteed carnage. Even in heavy air the
      loads are light, and with little body movement required, the only
      thing missing is a couple of beer holders.

      All in all the boat handled very well. It feels really, really solid.
      I never felt any flex in the amas or the main hull. The rig is pretty
      simple and the upper half bends nicely to leeward to de-power in the
      big gusts. On reaches I felt like the helm was a little light and
      would have raked the mast back a bit in those conditions (it's
      adjustable). There are a few minor things I would change like the jib
      leads (impossible to ease from the back of the boat) and mainsheet
      system (ratchet block and cleat), but otherwise this a very nice
      package for a very reasonable price. Big fun!
    • wetatri
      Bob, ... Thanks for posting your review!!! -CH
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 25, 2008
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        Bob,

        --- In Weta-Tri@yahoogroups.com, "wetabob" <bobhyde@...> wrote:

        > Hey Weta people, we would love to here your impressions of the Weta.
        > Here's a quick review reprinted from Sailing Anarchy Dinghy Forum,
        > April 8,2008, by bhyde (aka wetabob)...

        Thanks for posting your review!!!

        -CH
      • wet_dog_racing
        I ve posted a few things on SA wrt changes on the boat...however there are only 2 material changes I would consider (were I the boat s designer). 1) Traveller
        Message 3 of 4 , May 30, 2008
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          I've posted a few things on SA wrt changes on the boat...however there
          are only 2 material changes I would consider (were I the boat's
          designer).

          1) Traveller (for hull stiffness and sail control in heavy air)
          2) Chute (to prevent stuffing the bow downwind)

          The chute is likely a bigger deal and something I will be getting made
          for PHRF sailing. I'll let you know how it goes.

          This boat is a blast. Make no mistake about it, probably the best 10k
          sailing spend you'll ever make.

          C.
        • wetatri
          Wet Dog, I agree completely on the traveller. It would definitely help stiffen the back end. It would also allow a way to get the tiller forward of the
          Message 4 of 4 , May 30, 2008
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            Wet Dog,

            I agree completely on the traveller. It would definitely help stiffen
            the back end. It would also allow a way to get the tiller forward of
            the mainsheet. I posted a couple of pictures of the Corsair Sprint
            750 setup in the Photos section. I think this would be the ideal
            setup for the Weta!!!

            Question: Would a Hobie-type headsail furler work on the Weta? The
            reason for the question is that conditions here on S.F. Bay can change
            quickly. When single handing, if caught out when the wind pipes up,
            the furler would allow you to quickly put the jib away. Without it,
            if your are caught out, your option is..........???

            -WT



            --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "wet_dog_racing"
            <wet_dog_racing@...> wrote:
            >
            > I've posted a few things on SA wrt changes on the boat...however there
            > are only 2 material changes I would consider (were I the boat's
            > designer).
            >
            > 1) Traveller (for hull stiffness and sail control in heavy air)
            > 2) Chute (to prevent stuffing the bow downwind)
            >
            > The chute is likely a bigger deal and something I will be getting made
            > for PHRF sailing. I'll let you know how it goes.
            >
            > This boat is a blast. Make no mistake about it, probably the best 10k
            > sailing spend you'll ever make.
            >
            > C.
            >
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