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Mounting one or two compasses

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  • Tim Corcoran
    Hi Everyone Under the Weta class rules, section C.3.2 OPTIONAL : (e) Maximum two compasses with brackets. No electronic assistance permitted
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 27, 2011
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      Hi Everyone

      Under the Weta class rules, section C.3.2 OPTIONAL <equipment>:
      (e) Maximum two compasses with brackets. No electronic assistance permitted except timing device.
      Does this rule prohibit electronic compasses? Some have said no, but the phrasing above seems to rule out everything electronic except timers.

      I was thinking about tactical compasses to help my tacking and wind shift skill set (pretty thin at present). Does anyone have advise about compasses (especially tactical compasses)--mounting positions, brands they like or loathe?
      The Weta poses problems different from a monohull, any single mounting position has visibility problems from many parts of the boat. I'm not at all sure where I'd mount one compass. If one mounted two compasses, my first thought would be on the forward akas (the forward beams that hold the floats), plenty visible while hiking but less useful downwind. Alternatively, they might go on the rear akas if lubber lines were visible from both sides (not often the case) or on the sides of the cockpit (where they'd be in the way a lot). Hmmm.

      Opinions?

      Tim
    • Red Tuna
      A Ritchie XP-98w mounted just aft of the mast secured with 3M Dual Lock tape works very well and is visible from everywhere.
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 27, 2011
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        A Ritchie XP-98w mounted just aft of the mast secured with 3M Dual Lock tape works very well and is visible from everywhere.
      • Robert Shirley
        Tim,Save your money.  While racing, keep your eyes on the rest of the fleet, and the fleets ahead to determine tacking angles, headers and lifts.  While
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 27, 2011
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          Tim,Save your money.  While racing, keep your eyes on the rest of the fleet, and the fleets ahead to determine tacking angles, headers and lifts.  While daysailing or practicing, use your hand held GPS.
          I applaud your efforts to improve your skills as rapidly as possible. Max time on the water racing, learning from and imitating the leaders is the quickest way to improve.  Do what Bruce does.
          BS
          --- On Thu, 10/27/11, Tim Corcoran <tim.corcoran@...> wrote:
          .



          I was thinking about tactical compasses to help my tacking and wind shift skill set (pretty thin at present). Does anyone have advise about compasses (especially tactical compasses)--mounting positions, brands they like or loathe?


          Opinions?



          Tim



























          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David
          Yep. Xp98 is the one. Cheapest tactical compass available. Only real limitation is its tilt angle due to being surface mount which, of couse, is not an issue
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 27, 2011
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            Yep. Xp98 is the one. Cheapest tactical compass available. Only real limitation is its tilt angle due to being surface mount which, of couse, is not an issue on a trimaran. Lubber lines make it easy to read from anywhere on the boat. I agree with Robert that it's best to have your head out of the boat, but for certain situations (lake sailing is a good example) the tactical compass is an invaluable periodic reference. My XP98 was my secret weapon at Huntington Lake where I was unstoppable on the upwind legs. Now, I just need to learn how to use it downwind.

            Regarding the rules, they appear to be based, as many other one design dinghy classes are, on the Laser class rules where no electronics except timig device means exactly that--compass must be magnetic only.

            --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "Red Tuna" <redtuna23@...> wrote:
            >
            > A Ritchie XP-98w mounted just aft of the mast secured with 3M Dual Lock tape works very well and is visible from everywhere.
            >
          • Richard Stephens
            Tim, I ve used both the tactick micronet and a standalone tactick micro compass on bigger multihulls. I found the wind-shift features are not very useful in
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 27, 2011
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              Tim,

              I've used both the tactick micronet and a standalone tactick micro compass
              on bigger multihulls. I found the wind-shift features are not very useful in
              practice. In the end we just use the compass heading and keep track by
              writing it down. I actually prefer the ritchie xp98 that I have on the weta.
              The heading is just one number between 1-9, repeated on each quadrant, so it
              is the same number on each tack, and often on both gybes downwind. It is
              much simpler to remember, and you are not always mentally adding or
              subtracting 90.

              Even when I know if I am headed or lifted, I have never been able to figure
              out what the wind is going to do next. It seldom oscillates like they say in
              the textbooks (at least, in the places I sail). Rather than try to tack on
              shifts, I always try to sail to the strongest wind. The textbooks are often
              written for keelboats, that just heel over more and don't go much faster
              when they get into an area of stronger wind. The Weta goes much faster in
              more wind! Also, it is much easier to see the stronger wind on the water
              than it is to see a shift. Whenever I am thinking about a tack or gybe, I
              look to see which side of me has the better wind, and if I can catch a puff
              better by carrying on, or by tacking/gybing.

              Richard.


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            • Tim Corcoran
              Thanks to everyone for your input, very helpful. I m trying to keep my head out but I still feel that need for a range of feedback tools as there s so much to
              Message 6 of 12 , Oct 28, 2011
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                Thanks to everyone for your input, very helpful. I'm trying to keep my head out but I still feel that need for a range of feedback tools as there's so much to learn. Copying Bruce is quite helpful except when he's way the heck ahead of me, which is the usual case.

                Tim

                --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "David" <mariner1460@...> wrote:
                >
                > Yep. Xp98 is the one. Cheapest tactical compass available. Only real limitation is its tilt angle due to being surface mount which, of couse, is not an issue on a trimaran. Lubber lines make it easy to read from anywhere on the boat. I agree with Robert that it's best to have your head out of the boat, but for certain situations (lake sailing is a good example) the tactical compass is an invaluable periodic reference. My XP98 was my secret weapon at Huntington Lake where I was unstoppable on the upwind legs. Now, I just need to learn how to use it downwind.
                >
                > Regarding the rules, they appear to be based, as many other one design dinghy classes are, on the Laser class rules where no electronics except timig device means exactly that--compass must be magnetic only.
                >
                > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "Red Tuna" <redtuna23@> wrote:
                > >
                > > A Ritchie XP-98w mounted just aft of the mast secured with 3M Dual Lock tape works very well and is visible from everywhere.
                > >
                >
              • Oscar Kramer
                I just bought the XP-98 compass after a few of you discussed its merits. I hate looking at a compass while sailing a boat like the Weta where you can easily
                Message 7 of 12 , Nov 7, 2011
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                  I just bought the XP-98 compass after a few of you discussed its merits. I hate looking at a compass while sailing a boat like the Weta where you can easily feel what's going on. But it seems necessary for racing.

                  Red Tuna: you talked about using 3M Dual Lock for mounting behind the mast, but the compass is wider than the flat spot available just aft of the raised mast step molding. Does part of the compass hang off the edge then? Don't the jib sheets ever get caught on it?

                  How did the others (Hi Richard!) mount their XP-98s? Are we allowed to drill holes for this purpose? I would think so despite the "no holes" rule.

                  Thanks for any ideas.

                  Oscar
                  Miami Beach #502
                • Richard Stephens
                  ... get caught on it? Hi Oscar. Yes it overhangs the raised area just aft of the mast, but I have never had a problem with lines catching it. However I did set
                  Message 8 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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                    > Does part of the compass hang off the edge then? Don't the jib sheets ever
                    get caught on it?

                    Hi Oscar. Yes it overhangs the raised area just aft of the mast, but I have
                    never had a problem with lines catching it. However I did set up a little
                    safety line to tie it onto the mast step just in case.

                    Richard.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • eric e
                    look at the beams on this weta http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts-sail-boats/small-sailboats/auction-415762800.htm  [Non-text portions of
                    Message 9 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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                      look at the beams on this weta

                      http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts-sail-boats/small-sailboats/auction-415762800.htm%c2%a0



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Robert S
                      Apparently the original design, but curved carbon would have made it uneconomic to manufacture. Hull # must be in the low single digits.. Sent from my iPad
                      Message 10 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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                        Apparently the original design, but curved carbon would have made it uneconomic to manufacture. Hull # must be in the low single digits..

                        Sent from my iPad
                      • Bruce Fleming
                        Looks like they have a real traveler (is that a rigid track across the cockpit?) on it, too. Aloha, Bruce Bruce Fleming Akahele!, #276 San Diego, California
                        Message 11 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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                          Looks like they have a real traveler (is that a rigid track across the
                          cockpit?) on it, too.



                          Aloha,





                          Bruce



                          Bruce Fleming

                          Akahele!, #276

                          San Diego, California



                          From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com]
                          On Behalf Of eric e
                          Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2011 5:23 AM
                          To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] real old weta





                          look at the beams on this weta

                          http://www.trademe.co.nz/motors/boats-marine/yachts-sail-boats/small-sailboa
                          ts/auction-415762800.htm

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Robert S.
                          Interesting! - well spotted - I ll do a bit of fishing and see what I can find... ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          Message 12 of 12 , Nov 8, 2011
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                            Interesting! - well spotted - I'll do a bit of fishing and see what I can
                            find...

                            On 8 November 2011 21:15, Bruce Fleming <wavejump@...> wrote:

                            > **
                            >
                            >
                            > Looks like they have a real traveler (is that a rigid track across the
                            > cockpit?) on it, too.
                            >
                            > Aloha,
                            >
                            > Bruce
                            >
                            > Bruce Fleming
                            >
                            > Akahele!, #276
                            >
                            > San Diego, California
                            >
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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