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SoCal Race Saturday

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  • Robert Shirley
    I raced Saturday in the VSC Classic Plastic Turkey race.  Sadly, I was the only multihull. But, it was a perfect day for sailing: sunny with temps in the mid
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 30, 2010
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      I raced Saturday in the VSC Classic Plastic Turkey race.  Sadly, I was the only
      multihull. But, it was a perfect day for sailing: sunny with temps in the mid
      60s and wind in the mid-teens. It was a pursuit style race so I started last,
      behind the 18 mono-slugs. The first mono started an hour ahead of me, the
      fastest one started about 3 minutes ahead of me.  It was a 3 mile, light wind
      ,spinnaker reach to the first mark. I was going about 5.4 knts. I rounded it in
      3rd place behind a Hobie 33 and an Olsen 30. Next was a 5 mile, very close reach
      in building winds. I smoked the first two boats and had horizoned them by the
      second mark.  The crews on the monos were very graciously cheering me as I
      passed them. I think I found the notorious "death zone" for the WETA that is
      often discussed on the F-boat forum .   The wind was only blowing about 14 knts,
      but on that very close reach I needed every ounce of my 200 lbs to keep her on
      her feet. Of course, I could've de-powered one or both sails, but where is the
      fun in that? The third leg was downwind and the gennaker reaching and surfing
      was very tame compared to the previous, two sail tight reach.  The last leg was
      upwind, and again, it was tame compared to that tight reach.  I sailed the 15
      nautical mile course in 1 hour and 42 minutes. My max speed on the GPS was 12.8
      knts.  After the race, I was having so much fun that I kept blasting around in
      the ocean for another hour before going in.  Sometime I recorded a 13.8 knts. 
      Once inside the harbor, a mono-slug sailor flagged me down and asked for a ride.
      Of course I obliged and immediately handed him the tiller.  When we unfurled the
      turbo-charger, er, gennaker, he was STOKED!

      BTW:  The sailing in SoCal this fall has been phenomenal. Sunny days, steady
      winds....now if we could just get the water temp out of the 50s....

      These are the days.

      BS




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Robert Spencer
      As always Bob - your posts remind us of what makes the Weta special - in so many ways ! I, too work hard to keep the boat / sailor balance - by maintaining my
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2010
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        As always Bob - your posts remind us of what makes the Weta special - in so
        many ways !
        I, too work hard to keep the boat / sailor balance - by maintaining my 200
        lbs :)

        Now all I need to do is to figure out how to mak it go well in the LIGHT
        wind stuff (without having to remove a couple of limbs....)

        Another Robert...


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • David Berntsen
        Robert, Here are some tips on sailing your Weta in light wind. It s important to keep your weight forward in the boat so in really light wind I sit next to the
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 2, 2010
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          Robert,

          Here are some tips on sailing your Weta in light wind.

          It's important to keep your weight forward in the boat so in really light wind I sit next to the daggerboard (pushing the bow down into the water) and as the wind increases I start to hike out on the tramps but still keeping my weight forward.

          Make sure daggerboard is all the way down to increase lateral resistance.

          Don't over sheet the jib/main. They should be full in shape (while maintaining a tight leach) you will get more power from what wind there is.

          Ease jib halyard (luff tension) so the jib has a softer entry.

          Do not use any cunningham as this flattens the main.

          Sail you boat really flat (mast pointing straight up) and don't heel. This will keep both amas out of the water and reduce surface drag from the amas. A flat boat also maximizes lift from the daggerboard which transfers into forward drive of your boat.

          When tacking/jybing and moving around your boat move very smoothe (like a cat) as this will help the boat flow through the water. Jerky moves interupt the flow of the hull through the water and slow the boat down.

          Keep you rweight forward when tackign and jibing. If you run to the stern of the boat in a transition the stern sinks and stops the boat dead in its tracks.

          Most important - keep your weight forward!

          Aloha

          Davo
          WetaWest



          --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Robert Spencer <mfcdubai@...> wrote:
          >
          > As always Bob - your posts remind us of what makes the Weta special - in so
          > many ways !
          > I, too work hard to keep the boat / sailor balance - by maintaining my 200
          > lbs :)
          >
          > Now all I need to do is to figure out how to mak it go well in the LIGHT
          > wind stuff (without having to remove a couple of limbs....)
          >
          > Another Robert...
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Robert Spencer
          Guess what? race day today, and 5-8 kts... Did exactly as suggested, and managed to keep 4-5kts upwind. weight forward and boat level seems to make a big
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 3, 2010
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            Guess what? race day today, and 5-8 kts...

            Did exactly as suggested, and managed to keep 4-5kts upwind. weight forward
            and boat level seems to make a big difference, as does a large slice of
            patience...

            Tried to keep best sail shape - used the second from back hole on the main
            and jib - so light I probably should have used the rear one..

            Relatively loose jib haliard - seems to keep the shape better too.

            no cunningham - sail is a bit wrinkly (a bit like me!), but I guess a better
            curvature is better overall.

            smooth (weight fwd) tacking worked better than before.

            And now the next question.. downwind on a triangular course (windward /
            leeward with a wingmark) is it best to sail higher for speed (with board at
            about 50%), or lower and forget about boatspeed speed, and go for vmg. When
            I do the latter, I have great diffiaulty keeping the gennaker form
            collapsing..

            Anyway I got three fourth places today.... (only four boats racing :)

            Thanks for all the tips..

            Robert S.




            On 2 December 2010 20:59, David Berntsen <dave.berntsen@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > Robert,
            >
            > Here are some tips on sailing your Weta in light wind.
            >
            > It's important to keep your weight forward in the boat so in really light
            > wind I sit next to the daggerboard (pushing the bow down into the water) and
            > as the wind increases I start to hike out on the tramps but still keeping my
            > weight forward.
            >
            > Make sure daggerboard is all the way down to increase lateral resistance.
            >
            > Don't over sheet the jib/main. They should be full in shape (while
            > maintaining a tight leach) you will get more power from what wind there is.
            >
            > Ease jib halyard (luff tension) so the jib has a softer entry.
            >
            > Do not use any cunningham as this flattens the main.
            >
            > Sail you boat really flat (mast pointing straight up) and don't heel. This
            > will keep both amas out of the water and reduce surface drag from the amas.
            > A flat boat also maximizes lift from the daggerboard which transfers into
            > forward drive of your boat.
            >
            > When tacking/jybing and moving around your boat move very smoothe (like a
            > cat) as this will help the boat flow through the water. Jerky moves interupt
            > the flow of the hull through the water and slow the boat down.
            >
            > Keep you rweight forward when tackign and jibing. If you run to the stern
            > of the boat in a transition the stern sinks and stops the boat dead in its
            > tracks.
            >
            > Most important - keep your weight forward!
            >
            > Aloha
            >
            > Davo
            > WetaWest
            >
            >
            > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com <Weta-Trimarans%40yahoogroups.com>,
            > Robert Spencer <mfcdubai@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > As always Bob - your posts remind us of what makes the Weta special - in
            > so
            > > many ways !
            > > I, too work hard to keep the boat / sailor balance - by maintaining my
            > 200
            > > lbs :)
            > >
            > > Now all I need to do is to figure out how to mak it go well in the LIGHT
            > > wind stuff (without having to remove a couple of limbs....)
            > >
            > > Another Robert...
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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