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Race tuning

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  • Robert Shirley
    Hello WETA sailors, I will be racing my WETA for the first time this Sunday on a local lake. I have never sailed there before so have no idea what the
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 17, 2009
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      Hello WETA sailors,

      I will be racing my WETA for the first time this Sunday on a local lake. I have never sailed there before so have no idea what the conditions will be like, although I suspect the wind will be quite variable. I want to pick your brains about race tuning:

      Q: Which clew grommet to you attach the jib sheets to for optimal upwind performance in:
      a. light air
      b. heavy air
      c. variable air

      Q: Which clew grommet to you attach the Main sheet to for optimal performance in:
      a. light air
      b. heavy air
      c. variable air

      Q: how tight do you tension the rig in the various conditions?
      Q: how tight do you tension the Gennaker halyard in various conditions?
      Q: how tight do you tension the mainsail downhaul in various conditions?

      All opinions welcome, give me some feedback guys so I can correct out on my competition. Let's get a discussion going here.

      Thanks and pray for wind,

      Bob S.
    • tornadokc247
      I m not a WETA sailor (yet ;-) but here are the general rec s for my Tornado, use as you see fit: Placing the sheets on a higher clew attachment point for the
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 17, 2009
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        I'm not a WETA sailor (yet ;-) but here are the general rec's for my
        Tornado, use as you see fit:

        Placing the sheets on a higher clew attachment point for the jib
        places more tension on the sail leech and eases off the sail foot.
        This is generally the direction you move as winds lighten...you want
        to close up the leech and make the sail fuller. Opposite is true in
        higher winds. How far to go is very dependant on the particular boat
        and wind/wave conditions on the day. Also crew weight plays a role.

        On a boomless rig, I'd think you'd want a similar mindset...moving
        the sheet attachment aft/higher up in order to tension the leech in
        lighter air (do not cause it to hook to windward past centerline).
        Further forward/lower to loosen the leech (depowering) and tighten
        the foot (better pointing).


        Generally, rig (shroud) tension should be high enough to
        reduce/nearly prevent jib luff sag to leeward when the main is barely
        tight. You need to keep the main softly sheeted in light air to avoid
        hooking leech to weather...but you do want the jib luff as straight
        as possible...not sagging. Having the shrouds looser for heavy air
        doesn't really make much difference/little to no advantages...so set
        it up for the light conditions.

        Gennaker halyard tension...on the T, we set it so you can grab a fist
        full of luff and still turn your hand about 90 degrees before the
        tension stops you. From there, in light wind, we will tighten further
        (hand twist 10-15 degrees) in order to put more curvature in the
        leading section of the sail...fuller sail is better in lighter air.
        Note this is the opposite affect you get with the main & jib luff
        tension/downhauls. This is due to the way the gennaker is cut. I
        assume the Weta sails behave like the T's here. You want to sail with
        the genny luff on the point of collapsing...it should be
        rolling/curling pretty much all the time. Sheet in/out & steer to
        control. Try not to over sheet it...otherwise you'll be heading
        higher and higher to get some speed out and never getting to the
        downwind mark. If in doubt, ease it out! Then steer to keep her
        inflated. Steer gently...try for a +/-5-10 degrees adjustment at a
        time...let the boat speed adjust before going further.

        Downhaul/luff tension on the main...this will be very different than
        the T...you don't have a rotating, pre-bend wingmast with spreaders.
        So I'm not sure I'll be much help. You can to find out how the main
        responds to more luff tension...does it flatten the whole sail and
        bend the mast top off? If so, then this is where you need to go in
        higher winds to reduce the heeling. Ideally, you want a flat enough
        sail so that you can control the heel with only singe arm length
        adjustments on the main sheet. You'll be sheeting in/out pretty much
        every other second, but not lots of line if the sail is flat enough
        for the conditions. Don't go too flat...the boat will feel dead and
        slow.

        Telltales on the all sails are quite useful to help get the trim
        about right.


        Mike
        Tornado catamaran CAN 99 "Full Tilt"

        --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Robert Shirley <wetasocal@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hello WETA sailors,
        >
        > I will be racing my WETA for the first time this Sunday on a local
        lake. I have never sailed there before so have no idea what the
        conditions will be like, although I suspect the wind will be quite
        variable. I want to pick your brains about race tuning:
        >
        > Q: Which clew grommet to you attach the jib sheets to for optimal
        upwind performance in:
        > a. light air
        > b. heavy air
        > c. variable air
        >
        > Q: Which clew grommet to you attach the Main sheet to for optimal
        performance in:
        > a. light air
        > b. heavy air
        > c. variable air
        >
        > Q: how tight do you tension the rig in the various conditions?
        > Q: how tight do you tension the Gennaker halyard in various
        conditions?
        > Q: how tight do you tension the mainsail downhaul in various
        conditions?
        >
        > All opinions welcome, give me some feedback guys so I can correct
        out on my competition. Let's get a discussion going here.
        >
        > Thanks and pray for wind,
        >
        > Bob S.
        >
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