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4293Re: Oars

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  • yottieguy
    Jan 4, 2013
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      The EC regulations (http://www.watertribe.com/PDF/WaterTribeRules.pdf) require that you must be able to reduce the sail area. I have no idea how this was achieved on the Weta.

      Reduction of Sail Area
      All sailing boats must have methods for reducing sail area while underway.
      All boats with sails over 1 square meter must have a practical, tested means of reducing sail area for strong wind. Sail reduction must be possible while under way in rough water, without causing loss of control or stability, or other danger to the crew.
      Boats must be able to reduce main sail area in increments of not more than 33% by any of the following means: Slab/jiffy reefing, zippered panels, roller reefing.
      Total working sail area must be able to be reduced in increments of not more than 25% by any of the following means: Slab/jiffy reefing, zippered panels, roller reefing, lowering/furling/removing one sail in multiple-sail rigs, or replacing one sail with a smaller one in multiple-sail rigs.
      A storm sail that is set in place of the mainsail is allowed but does not qualify in meeting the above sail reduction rules.
      It must be possible to reduce sail area to 60% of total working sail or less. The boat must be balanced, controllable and able to sail efficiently to windward under the reduced sail plan. Sailboat crews may be required to demonstrate sail reduction techniques during pre-race equipment check.

      --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Mark Iverson wrote:
      >
      > Reef? Custom sails? Please Elaborate!
      >
      > Thx
      > Mark Iverson
      > Seattle
      >
      > On Jan 4, 2013, at 12:55 PM, "yottieguy" wrote:
      >
      > > The problem on the Everglades Challenge (EC) is usually too little wind on the route inside the shoreline using the Intercoastal Waterway (hence the oars) or too much wind without any warning on the Gulf side.
      > >
      > > I don't think a Weta has actually finished the race yet - the one pictured got hit by a storm on day 2 and overturned in shallow water so that the mast dug into the mud and had to be disconnected from the hull - then the mast was broken on retrieval by a power boat.
      > >
      > > This begs the question - would you be better off having a masthead float to prevent the boat overturning in shallow water? (most of the EC route is shallow) but that risks that the boat would be blown away from you unless you're tied on.
      > >
      > > Of course if you don't go over you won't have any problem! But that requires you to recognise the squalls early and reef before they hit. This when you haven't had much sleep, you're cold and wet and its dark.
      > >
      > > --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, Jonathan Weston wrote:
      > > >
      > > > That's cool stuff. I hope there is wind so that the Weta kicks ass. JW
      > > > never pokes fun, just gators.
      > > >
      > > > On Thu, Jan 3, 2013 at 2:49 PM, Bruce Fleming wrote:
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
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