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2904Re: [Weta-Trimarans] Re: Smaller heavy air mainsail and club roller-furling jib

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  • eric e
    Nov 1, 2011
      there are a few laser like, small yamaha dinghies that also have different mast spots for sloop or uni rig to the helm issue is addressed

      in theory the weta mast could simply raked forward more to compensate a jib-less rig, mast top 1 foot forward? but in practice you can only go a few inches before the forestay would meet the eyelets

      a furling jib allows you to furl on over-powered reaches and then unfurl for easier tacks but you can also gybe about to the new tack easy enough


      ________________________________
      From: Tim Corcoran <tim.corcoran@...>
      To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, November 1, 2011 2:48 PM
      Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Re: Smaller heavy air mainsail and club roller-furling jib


       
      Hi John

      Interesting you note the Mirror dinghy's two mast steps. I still own my Mirror, but never had the occasion or inclination to try the forward step--some Mirror owners simply left it off altogether, viewing it as unnecessary and unwanted. Perhaps in more blustery conditions it made some sense. For the Weta, obviously, such an idea is out of class rules.
      I was just looking over the Weta manual tonight, and it explicitly discusses the changes in mast rake required to deal with the weather helm issues arising from going main + jib to main only. That said, many have noted that handling without the jib is not great, even if it's blowing.

      Tim

      --- In Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com, "John Fairclough" <john.fairclough@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear Jaffar
      >
      > I have the smaller main which I have used a few times although not often.
      >
      > I would first mention that I found that excessive weather helm was a
      > problem, not surprisingly, in very strong winds with the normal full main
      > and no jib. I was sailing with my son as crew at the time and found in very
      > strong gusts (+35mph) that weather helm was so strong that a plume of water
      > was thrown up from the rudder blade and the boat was going very slowly,
      > mainly because of the braking effect of the rudder. We had previously been
      > sailing with full main and full jib, but in the squall, that was too much
      > sail to have up.
      >
      > As a "get us home measure" we rolled out about half of the jib. That
      > improved the balance and the boat started sailing quite well again. That
      > would have put extra loads on the half rolled jib, so would not do that
      > normally.
      >
      > I am pleased to have the smaller main, and used this recently at the recent
      > swarm of UK owners at Calshot on Southampton water. I was, to an extent,
      > influenced by the close proximity of the very busy shipping lane and also
      > felt a bit lazy at the time.
      >
      > Still no surprise, but with the normal (roller) jib, fully unfurled, and the
      > small main, and fresh although not extreme winds when I was out (those came
      > later when I was safely ashore) lee helm was a feature, although not
      > extreme.
      >
      > I prefer sailing with a jib even in strong winds. It helps to tack, among
      > other things. It seems that if the standing rigging is adjusted correctly
      > for the normal set up, that will change when the sail plan changes. It
      > must!
      >
      > Interestingly, the Mirror dinghy has two mast steps. The forward one is for
      > use with just the mainsail.
      >
      > There is no need for a new halyard with the smaller main. I have a rope
      > strop permanently attached to the small main, and use the normal halyard and
      > halyard lock.
      >
      > Regards
      >
      > John Fairclough
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com]
      > On Behalf Of Jaffar
      > Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 11:47 PM
      > To: Weta-Trimarans@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Weta-Trimarans] Smaller heavy air mainsail and club roller-furling
      > jib
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > According to the Wetamarine FAQ, there is a smaller official Weta
      > mainsail :
      > The standard main sail has no provision for reefing. A smaller 6.5sqm
      > main sail is available. This can be used for sailing schools so they can
      > still teach comfortably in 20knots of wind and is also great for lighter
      > sailors so they can also sail in higher winds using the jib as well.
      > Under main alone the Weta is nicely balanced and sails well. This is a
      > good sail combination for the single handed sailor when the wind gets
      > up. Owners have the option of adding reefing holes to their existing
      > mainsail.
      > As the option of adding reefing holes to the existing main is not very
      > appealing, I am considering the smaller main for solo sailing and racing
      > in heavier air.
      >
      > Who has experience with it and can say something on the subject? Is it a
      > flatter cut than the regular mylar main? Should I assume that I should
      > also have a new halyard made with a longer wire strop?
      >
      > I am also considering getting a club roller-furling jib that was
      > described in an earlier discussion as a good sail to have in heavier
      > air. I am thus also interested in any new comment people may have on the
      > subject, as the sail has not originally been designed with such purpose
      > in mind.
      >
      > Jaffar
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




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