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Re: [WestMichiganHams] Only Slightly OT, cable problems after Hurricane Sandy?

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  • Richards
    Cool, and scary. Shows the problems with progress as it piles up new on old on older yet and it becomes rather complicated to manage and even worse to
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 2, 2012
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      Cool, and scary. Shows the problems with "progress" as it piles up
      new on old on older yet and it becomes rather complicated to manage and
      even worse to repair. I would hate to be the guy who has to sort out
      all those now unlabeled splices...

      Thanks Tom.
      -------------------------- JHR -------------------------------



      On 12/2/2012 7:01 PM, K8TB wrote:
      > Ever have a flooded basement? Take a look at what happened to the
      > telephone cables underground in New York City;

      ____________________________________________
    • Mark
      Not to minimize the effects of the hurricane, but this type of repair goes on every day. As an electrician, I got to see it up close and personal. When the
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 3, 2012
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        Not to minimize the effects of the hurricane, but this type of repair goes on every day.
         
        As an electrician, I got to see it up close and personal.  When the big paper machine at Sappi burned up, the mess there made the pics of the Verizon vaults look like child's play.  Sappi was WAY worse because before it got soaked by water, it was in a fire hot enough to melt steel beams.
         
        Two guys with radios can sort out hundreds of wires and cables per hour.  They use electronic tracers which incorporate radio.  A signal is injected at one end of the wire and can be detected with a receiver at the other.  The method is called 'ringing out' for some reason.  It can be done without the tracers, but the process is much slower.
         
        Most underground cable works fine underwater.  The trendways (covered cement trenches) at the Zeeland power plant that carry many thousands of amps are usually full of water and have to be pumped out in order to work on the cables.  It's not the water that is the worry, it's if the water made it through the insulation or not.  Normally, not. 
         
        Testing the insulation of the cables can be time consuming, but is way better than just ripping out cables because they got wet.
         
        Imagine the electricians that are working in flooded vaults with electric cables carrying thousands of volts.  That's going on there, too.  I don't think the Verizon guys have to worry much about as far as getting fried from a phone line down there.
         
        73
         
        Mark K8MHZ
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Richards
        Sent: Sunday, December 02, 2012 7:50 PM
        To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Only Slightly OT, cable problems after Hurricane Sandy?

         

        Cool, and scary. Shows the problems with "progress" as it piles up
        new on old on older yet and it becomes rather complicated to manage and
        even worse to repair. I would hate to be the guy who has to sort out
        all those now unlabeled splices...

        Thanks Tom.
        -------------------------- JHR -------------------------------

        On 12/2/2012 7:01 PM, K8TB wrote:
        > Ever have a flooded basement? Take a look at what happened to the
        > telephone cables underground in New York City;

        ____________________________________________

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