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Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed

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  • timothy courtier
    Hello, Motorola was king of police radios from about 1929 to mid 70s. The early units from 1920s to mid 40s were about the size of a small suitcase, and were
    Message 1 of 14 , May 7, 2012
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      Hello,
      Motorola was king of police radios from about 1929 to mid 70s.
      The early units from 1920s to mid 40s were about the size of a small suitcase, and were in the trunk of the car.
      The controls were under the dash, and the mic was about the size of a pint of milk.
      The frequency was from 1.7 to 1.85 kc, and was on AM.
      After WW2, the frequency changed to 40.000 to 45.000 Mhz.
      and was still AM untill about the latter 50s to early 60s.
      About that time, the new FM radios started to arrive with smaller units and new bands.
      The Michigan State Police were on 2 frequencies untill about the end of the 90s.
      42.580Mhz Base to Car and Car to Car.
      42.740Mhz Car to Base.
      My timeline may be off by about a few years, but i hope this helps abit.
      Timothy KB8AFS
      --- On Mon, 5/7/12, N8GMY <N8GMY@...> wrote:

      From: N8GMY <N8GMY@...>
      Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
      To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 11:09 AM

       
      My son is in the automotive program at NMC in Traverse City. He and some other students have a 1962 Ford Galaxy. They are going to restore it and paint it to replicate the car that Barney Fife drove in the TV series in the town of Mayberry.

      The car has a spring whip antenna. It looks like an 11 meter antenna. Most of the photos show it bent around and hooked to the drip gutter near the driver's door.

      His question to me is what kind of police radios were being used in 1962. I am going to look for one for him, but I do not have any idea about these. I presume they were tube radios and they probably were quite large. I don't need one that works, just one that would replicate what was used at the time.

      Can anyone give me any guidance about what to look for and maybe even where to look? I can find a CB antenna like the one they had, so that isn't a problem.

      Ross
      N8GMY

    • Al Pepping
      The MSP was the first police department in the nation to have radios. They even had receivers on their motorcycles. They were only receivers. No
      Message 2 of 14 , May 7, 2012
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        The MSP was the first police department in the nation to have radios.  They even had receivers on their motorcycles.  They were only receivers.  No transmitters at first.   And not secure . .  In the cruisers at the time, when an officer received a notification, he had to go to a call box and call the department to get his information.   Any person with an AM radio usually had enough room to the top of the band to tune in the police.  Many console shortwave consoles even had he band marked out "for your listening pleasure.
            The scanner laws have changed, but before scanners were around, it was illegal to have a receiver equipped in your vehicle capable of receiving police frequencies unless the vehicle owner had a general class amateur license or higher or you had a permit from the MSP.  The reason ????  When the Detroit PD began dispatching, their dispatchers were all hams and were located in an attic space at one of the Detroit precincts .    Since the Michigan Vehicle Code book was/still is complex, many police officers were not aware of the amateur exemption.  It was advised that hams carried a copy of the law with them and courteously show it to an officer if he was not aware of the law.       KV8X
         
         
         
         
        -------Original Message-------
         
        Date: 5/7/2012 10:52:24 PM
        Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
         
         

        Hello,
        Motorola was king of police radios from about 1929 to mid 70s.
        The early units from 1920s to mid 40s were about the size of a small suitcase, and were in the trunk of the car.
        The controls were under the dash, and the mic was about the size of a pint of milk.
        The frequency was from 1.7 to 1.85 kc, and was on AM.
        After WW2, the frequency changed to 40.000 to 45.000 Mhz.
        and was still AM untill about the latter 50s to early 60s.
        About that time, the new FM radios started to arrive with smaller units and new bands.
        The Michigan State Police were on 2 frequencies untill about the end of the 90s.
        42.580Mhz Base to Car and Car to Car.
        42.740Mhz Car to Base.
        My timeline may be off by about a few years, but i hope this helps abit.
        Timothy KB8AFS
        --- On Mon, 5/7/12, N8GMY <N8GMY@...> wrote:

        From: N8GMY <N8GMY@...>
        Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
        To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 11:09 AM

         
        My son is in the automotive program at NMC in Traverse City. He and some other students have a 1962 Ford Galaxy. They are going to restore it and paint it to replicate the car that Barney Fife drove in the TV series in the town of Mayberry.

        The car has a spring whip antenna. It looks like an 11 meter antenna. Most of the photos show it bent around and hooked to the drip gutter near the driver's door.

        His question to me is what kind of police radios were being used in 1962. I am going to look for one for him, but I do not have any idea about these. I presume they were tube radios and they probably were quite large. I don't need one that works, just one that would replicate what was used at the time.

        Can anyone give me any guidance about what to look for and maybe even where to look? I can find a CB antenna like the one they had, so that isn't a problem.

        Ross
        N8GMY

         
      • timothy courtier
        i still have my MSP permit. ... From: Al Pepping Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed To:
        Message 3 of 14 , May 7, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          i still have my MSP permit.

          --- On Tue, 5/8/12, Al Pepping <kv8x@...> wrote:

          From: Al Pepping <kv8x@...>
          Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
          To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 12:03 AM

           
          The MSP was the first police department in the nation to have radios.  They even had receivers on their motorcycles.  They were only receivers.  No transmitters at first.   And not secure . .  In the cruisers at the time, when an officer received a notification, he had to go to a call box and call the department to get his information.   Any person with an AM radio usually had enough room to the top of the band to tune in the police.  Many console shortwave consoles even had he band marked out "for your listening pleasure.
              The scanner laws have changed, but before scanners were around, it was illegal to have a receiver equipped in your vehicle capable of receiving police frequencies unless the vehicle owner had a general class amateur license or higher or you had a permit from the MSP.  The reason ????  When the Detroit PD began dispatching, their dispatchers were all hams and were located in an attic space at one of the Detroit precincts .    Since the Michigan Vehicle Code book was/still is complex, many police officers were not aware of the amateur exemption.  It was advised that hams carried a copy of the law with them and courteously show it to an officer if he was not aware of the law.       KV8X
           
           
           
           
          -------Original Message-------
           
          Date: 5/7/2012 10:52:24 PM
          Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
           
           
          Hello,
          Motorola was king of police radios from about 1929 to mid 70s.
          The early units from 1920s to mid 40s were about the size of a small suitcase, and were in the trunk of the car.
          The controls were under the dash, and the mic was about the size of a pint of milk.
          The frequency was from 1.7 to 1.85 kc, and was on AM.
          After WW2, the frequency changed to 40.000 to 45.000 Mhz.
          and was still AM untill about the latter 50s to early 60s.
          About that time, the new FM radios started to arrive with smaller units and new bands.
          The Michigan State Police were on 2 frequencies untill about the end of the 90s.
          42.580Mhz Base to Car and Car to Car.
          42.740Mhz Car to Base.
          My timeline may be off by about a few years, but i hope this helps abit.
          Timothy KB8AFS
          --- On Mon, 5/7/12, N8GMY <N8GMY@...> wrote:

          From: N8GMY <N8GMY@...>
          Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
          To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 11:09 AM

           
          My son is in the automotive program at NMC in Traverse City. He and some other students have a 1962 Ford Galaxy. They are going to restore it and paint it to replicate the car that Barney Fife drove in the TV series in the town of Mayberry.

          The car has a spring whip antenna. It looks like an 11 meter antenna. Most of the photos show it bent around and hooked to the drip gutter near the driver's door.

          His question to me is what kind of police radios were being used in 1962. I am going to look for one for him, but I do not have any idea about these. I presume they were tube radios and they probably were quite large. I don't need one that works, just one that would replicate what was used at the time.

          Can anyone give me any guidance about what to look for and maybe even where to look? I can find a CB antenna like the one they had, so that isn't a problem.

          Ross
          N8GMY

           
        • Thomas Reed
          Found this guy online . I use to have a bunch of these years ago , but don t anymore. http://www.dcaptain.com/radios.htm W8WXM ________________________________
          Message 4 of 14 , May 8, 2012
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            Found this guy online .
            I use to have a bunch of these years ago , but don't anymore.

            http://www.dcaptain.com/radios.htm

            W8WXM


            From: timothy courtier <pobox740@...>
            To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, May 8, 2012 1:44 AM
            Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed

            i still have my MSP permit.

            --- On Tue, 5/8/12, Al Pepping <kv8x@...> wrote:

            From: Al Pepping <kv8x@...>
            Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
            To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 12:03 AM

             
            The MSP was the first police department in the nation to have radios.  They even had receivers on their motorcycles.  They were only receivers.  No transmitters at first.   And not secure . .  In the cruisers at the time, when an officer received a notification, he had to go to a call box and call the department to get his information.   Any person with an AM radio usually had enough room to the top of the band to tune in the police.  Many console shortwave consoles even had he band marked out "for your listening pleasure.
                The scanner laws have changed, but before scanners were around, it was illegal to have a receiver equipped in your vehicle capable of receiving police frequencies unless the vehicle owner had a general class amateur license or higher or you had a permit from the MSP.  The reason ????  When the Detroit PD began dispatching, their dispatchers were all hams and were located in an attic space at one of the Detroit precincts .    Since the Michigan Vehicle Code book was/still is complex, many police officers were not aware of the amateur exemption.  It was advised that hams carried a copy of the law with them and courteously show it to an officer if he was not aware of the law.       KV8X
             
             
             
             
            -------Original Message-------
             
            Date: 5/7/2012 10:52:24 PM
            Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
             
             
            Hello,
            Motorola was king of police radios from about 1929 to mid 70s.
            The early units from 1920s to mid 40s were about the size of a small suitcase, and were in the trunk of the car.
            The controls were under the dash, and the mic was about the size of a pint of milk.
            The frequency was from 1.7 to 1.85 kc, and was on AM.
            After WW2, the frequency changed to 40.000 to 45.000 Mhz.
            and was still AM untill about the latter 50s to early 60s.
            About that time, the new FM radios started to arrive with smaller units and new bands.
            The Michigan State Police were on 2 frequencies untill about the end of the 90s.
            42.580Mhz Base to Car and Car to Car.
            42.740Mhz Car to Base.
            My timeline may be off by about a few years, but i hope this helps abit.
            Timothy KB8AFS
            --- On Mon, 5/7/12, N8GMY <N8GMY@...> wrote:

            From: N8GMY <N8GMY@...>
            Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
            To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 11:09 AM

             
            My son is in the automotive program at NMC in Traverse City. He and some other students have a 1962 Ford Galaxy. They are going to restore it and paint it to replicate the car that Barney Fife drove in the TV series in the town of Mayberry.

            The car has a spring whip antenna. It looks like an 11 meter antenna. Most of the photos show it bent around and hooked to the drip gutter near the driver's door.

            His question to me is what kind of police radios were being used in 1962. I am going to look for one for him, but I do not have any idea about these. I presume they were tube radios and they probably were quite large. I don't need one that works, just one that would replicate what was used at the time.

            Can anyone give me any guidance about what to look for and maybe even where to look? I can find a CB antenna like the one they had, so that isn't a problem.

            Ross
            N8GMY

             


          • Thomas Reed
            Here s another neat site on vintage Motorola police radios http://www.wb6nvh.com/Moto42/Moto42.htm de W8WXM ________________________________ From: Thomas Reed
            Message 5 of 14 , May 8, 2012
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              Here's another neat site on vintage Motorola police radios

              http://www.wb6nvh.com/Moto42/Moto42.htm

              de W8WXM


              From: Thomas Reed <specweldinc@...>
              To: "WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com" <WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, May 8, 2012 7:20 AM
              Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed

              Found this guy online .
              I use to have a bunch of these years ago , but don't anymore.

              http://www.dcaptain.com/radios.htm

              W8WXM


              From: timothy courtier <pobox740@...>
              To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Tuesday, May 8, 2012 1:44 AM
              Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed

              i still have my MSP permit.

              --- On Tue, 5/8/12, Al Pepping <kv8x@...> wrote:

              From: Al Pepping <kv8x@...>
              Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
              To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 12:03 AM

               
              The MSP was the first police department in the nation to have radios.  They even had receivers on their motorcycles.  They were only receivers.  No transmitters at first.   And not secure . .  In the cruisers at the time, when an officer received a notification, he had to go to a call box and call the department to get his information.   Any person with an AM radio usually had enough room to the top of the band to tune in the police.  Many console shortwave consoles even had he band marked out "for your listening pleasure.
                  The scanner laws have changed, but before scanners were around, it was illegal to have a receiver equipped in your vehicle capable of receiving police frequencies unless the vehicle owner had a general class amateur license or higher or you had a permit from the MSP.  The reason ????  When the Detroit PD began dispatching, their dispatchers were all hams and were located in an attic space at one of the Detroit precincts .    Since the Michigan Vehicle Code book was/still is complex, many police officers were not aware of the amateur exemption.  It was advised that hams carried a copy of the law with them and courteously show it to an officer if he was not aware of the law.       KV8X
               
               
               
               
              -------Original Message-------
               
              Date: 5/7/2012 10:52:24 PM
              Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
               
               
              Hello,
              Motorola was king of police radios from about 1929 to mid 70s.
              The early units from 1920s to mid 40s were about the size of a small suitcase, and were in the trunk of the car.
              The controls were under the dash, and the mic was about the size of a pint of milk.
              The frequency was from 1.7 to 1.85 kc, and was on AM.
              After WW2, the frequency changed to 40.000 to 45.000 Mhz.
              and was still AM untill about the latter 50s to early 60s.
              About that time, the new FM radios started to arrive with smaller units and new bands.
              The Michigan State Police were on 2 frequencies untill about the end of the 90s.
              42.580Mhz Base to Car and Car to Car.
              42.740Mhz Car to Base.
              My timeline may be off by about a few years, but i hope this helps abit.
              Timothy KB8AFS
              --- On Mon, 5/7/12, N8GMY <N8GMY@...> wrote:

              From: N8GMY <N8GMY@...>
              Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
              To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 11:09 AM

               
              My son is in the automotive program at NMC in Traverse City. He and some other students have a 1962 Ford Galaxy. They are going to restore it and paint it to replicate the car that Barney Fife drove in the TV series in the town of Mayberry.

              The car has a spring whip antenna. It looks like an 11 meter antenna. Most of the photos show it bent around and hooked to the drip gutter near the driver's door.

              His question to me is what kind of police radios were being used in 1962. I am going to look for one for him, but I do not have any idea about these. I presume they were tube radios and they probably were quite large. I don't need one that works, just one that would replicate what was used at the time.

              Can anyone give me any guidance about what to look for and maybe even where to look? I can find a CB antenna like the one they had, so that isn't a problem.

              Ross
              N8GMY

               




            • Robert Bailey
              Intresting project,,made me take a look.I found this web site,,tells it all..Intresting reading.
              Message 6 of 14 , May 8, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Intresting project,,made me take a look.I found this web site,,tells it all..Intresting reading.
                According to the artical,your son is looking for a motorola Twin V,and a 102"whip from Radio Shack cut to about 72"
                Have a good day,n8xlx

                --- On Mon, 5/7/12, N8GMY <N8GMY@...> wrote:

                From: N8GMY <N8GMY@...>
                Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
                To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 11:09 AM

                 
                My son is in the automotive program at NMC in Traverse City. He and some other students have a 1962 Ford Galaxy. They are going to restore it and paint it to replicate the car that Barney Fife drove in the TV series in the town of Mayberry.

                The car has a spring whip antenna. It looks like an 11 meter antenna. Most of the photos show it bent around and hooked to the drip gutter near the driver's door.

                His question to me is what kind of police radios were being used in 1962. I am going to look for one for him, but I do not have any idea about these. I presume they were tube radios and they probably were quite large. I don't need one that works, just one that would replicate what was used at the time.

                Can anyone give me any guidance about what to look for and maybe even where to look? I can find a CB antenna like the one they had, so that isn't a problem.

                Ross
                N8GMY

              • Al Pepping
                I would check with the MSP but like the 1st,2nd and 3rd class radiotelephone licenses, I think there is no longer permits issued or required. I do not have
                Message 7 of 14 , May 8, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  I would check with the  MSP  but like the 1st,2nd and 3rd class radiotelephone licenses,  I think there is no longer permits issued or required.  I do not have a new edition of the Michigan Vehicle Code Book, but if you're interested you can check it on the Internet.  I remember early in my career the veteran officers telling how they would get in their squad cars, start them up and wait until the dynamotors wound up and the radios would come to life.  You couldn't park very long with the radios on and the engine off or you would drain the car battery in short order, they drew a lot of current,   ah the good old days.......
                   
                   
                   
                   
                  -------Original Message-------
                   
                  Date: 5/8/2012 1:44:31 AM
                  Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
                   
                  i still have my MSP permit.

                  --- On Tue, 5/8/12, Al Pepping <kv8x@...> wrote:

                  From: Al Pepping <kv8x@...>
                  Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
                  To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 12:03 AM

                   
                  The MSP was the first police department in the nation to have radios.  They even had receivers on their motorcycles.  They were only receivers.  No transmitters at first.   And not secure . .  In the cruisers at the time, when an officer received a notification, he had to go to a call box and call the department to get his information.   Any person with an AM radio usually had enough room to the top of the band to tune in the police.  Many console shortwave consoles even had he band marked out "for your listening pleasure.
                      The scanner laws have changed, but before scanners were around, it was illegal to have a receiver equipped in your vehicle capable of receiving police frequencies unless the vehicle owner had a general class amateur license or higher or you had a permit from the MSP.  The reason ????  When the Detroit PD began dispatching, their dispatchers were all hams and were located in an attic space at one of the Detroit precincts .    Since the Michigan Vehicle Code book was/still is complex, many police officers were not aware of the amateur exemption.  It was advised that hams carried a copy of the law with them and courteously show it to an officer if he was not aware of the law.       KV8X
                   
                   
                   
                   
                  -------Original Message-------
                   
                  Date: 5/7/2012 10:52:24 PM
                  Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
                   
                   
                  Hello,
                  Motorola was king of police radios from about 1929 to mid 70s.
                  The early units from 1920s to mid 40s were about the size of a small suitcase, and were in the trunk of the car.
                  The controls were under the dash, and the mic was about the size of a pint of milk.
                  The frequency was from 1.7 to 1.85 kc, and was on AM.
                  After WW2, the frequency changed to 40.000 to 45.000 Mhz.
                  and was still AM untill about the latter 50s to early 60s.
                  About that time, the new FM radios started to arrive with smaller units and new bands.
                  The Michigan State Police were on 2 frequencies untill about the end of the 90s.
                  42.580Mhz Base to Car and Car to Car.
                  42.740Mhz Car to Base.
                  My timeline may be off by about a few years, but i hope this helps abit.
                  Timothy KB8AFS
                  --- On Mon, 5/7/12, N8GMY <N8GMY@...> wrote:

                  From: N8GMY <N8GMY@...>
                  Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Old Radio Advice Needed
                  To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, May 7, 2012, 11:09 AM

                   
                  My son is in the automotive program at NMC in Traverse City. He and some other students have a 1962 Ford Galaxy. They are going to restore it and paint it to replicate the car that Barney Fife drove in the TV series in the town of Mayberry.

                  The car has a spring whip antenna. It looks like an 11 meter antenna. Most of the photos show it bent around and hooked to the drip gutter near the driver's door.

                  His question to me is what kind of police radios were being used in 1962. I am going to look for one for him, but I do not have any idea about these. I presume they were tube radios and they probably were quite large. I don't need one that works, just one that would replicate what was used at the time.

                  Can anyone give me any guidance about what to look for and maybe even where to look? I can find a CB antenna like the one they had, so that isn't a problem.

                  Ross
                  N8GMY

                   
                   
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