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Re: [WestMichiganHams] Winter Storm Watch

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  • wd8usa@aol.com
    Perhaps a snowfall net event? JB ... From: Jeffs lists To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, 17 Dec 2008 11:28 am Subject:
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 17, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Perhaps a snowfall net event? JB


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jeffs lists <lists@...>
      To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Wed, 17 Dec 2008 11:28 am
      Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Winter Storm Watch

      I’m sure you’ve all seen the info on tv.  Sounds like this one could be exciting.  
       
       
      WWUS43 KGRR 171615
      WSWGRR

      URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
      NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND RAPIDS MI
      1115 AM EST WED DEC 17 2008

      Winter Storm Watch... IN EFFECT...

      .A STRENGTHENING LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL TRACK FROM THE CENTRAL
      PLAINS TO NORTHERN OHIO THURSDAY NIGHT AND FRIDAY. SIGNIFICANT
      ACCUMULATIONS OF SNOW AND ICE ARE POSSIBLE ALONG AND NORTH OF THE
      LOW TRACK.

      MIZ037>040-043>046-050>052-056>059-064>067-071>074-180015-
      /O.CON.KGRR. WS.A.0014. 081218T2200Z- 081219T2100Z/
      MASON-LAKE-OSCEOLA- CLARE-OCEANA- NEWAYGO-MECOSTA- ISABELLA- MUSKEGON-
      MONTCALM-GRATIOT- OTTAWA-KENT- IONIA-CLINTON- ALLEGAN-BARRY- EATON-
      INGHAM-VAN BUREN-KALAMAZOO- CALHOUN- JACKSON-
      INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...LUDINGTON. ..BALDWIN. ..REED CITY...
      CLARE...HART. ..FREMONT. ..BIG RAPIDS...MOUNT PLEASANT...MUSKEGON ...
      GREENVILLE.. .ALMA...JENISON. ..GRAND RAPIDS...IONIA. ..ST. JOHNS...
      HOLLAND...HASTINGS. ..CHARLOTTE. ..LANSING. ..SOUTH HAVEN...
      KALAMAZOO... BATTLE CREEK...JACKSON
      1115 AM EST WED DEC 17 2008

      Winter Storm Watch... REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON
      THROUGH FRIDAY AFTERNOON...

      A WINTER STORM WATCH FOR THE POTENTIAL OF SIGNIFICANT SNOW AND ICE
      ACCUMULATIONS REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
      FRIDAY AFTERNOON.

      THE POTENTIAL EXISTS FOR 8 OR MORE INCHES OR SNOW ACROSS THE WATCH
      AREA THURSDAY NIGHT AND FRIDAY. IT NOW APPEARS THAT THE HIGHEST
      LIKELIHOOD OF FREEZING RAIN WITH ICE ACCUMULATION IN EXCESS OF ONE
      QUARTER INCH WILL BE ALONG AND SOUTH OF INTERSTATE 94. MOSTLY SNOW
      IS NOW EXPECTED NORTH OF INTERSTATE 94.

      A WINTER STORM WATCH IS ISSUED WHEN SEVERE WINTER WEATHER IS
      POSSIBLE BUT NOT IMMINENT. AT THE TIME THERE IS A POTENTIAL FOR
      SIGNIFICANT SNOW AND OR ICE ACCUMULATIONS. FUTURE DRIVING AND
      WALKING CONDITIONS MAY BECOME HAZARDOUS... SO IT IS IMPORTANT TO
      MONITOR THE LATEST FORECASTS.

    • Jeffs lists
      How about Friday on the 5.27 Joe? Will you be around to run it? From: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 17, 2008
      • 0 Attachment

        How about Friday on the 5.27 Joe?  Will you be around to run it?   

         

         

         

        From: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of wd8usa@...
        Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2008 10:22 PM
        To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Winter Storm Watch

         

        Perhaps a snowfall net event? JB


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Jeffs lists <lists@...>
        To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wed, 17 Dec 2008 11:28 am
        Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Winter Storm Watch

        I’m sure you’ve all seen the info on tv.  Sounds like this one could be exciting.  

         

         

        WWUS43 KGRR 171615
        WSWGRR

        URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
        NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND RAPIDS MI
        1115 AM EST WED DEC 17 2008

        Winter Storm Watch... IN EFFECT...

        .A STRENGTHENING LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL TRACK FROM THE CENTRAL
        PLAINS TO NORTHERN OHIO THURSDAY NIGHT AND FRIDAY. SIGNIFICANT
        ACCUMULATIONS OF SNOW AND ICE ARE POSSIBLE ALONG AND NORTH OF THE
        LOW TRACK.

        MIZ037>040-043>046-050>052-056>059-064>067-071>074-180015-
        /O.CON.KGRR.WS.A.0014.081218T2200Z-081219T2100Z/
        MASON-LAKE-OSCEOLA-CLARE-OCEANA-NEWAYGO-MECOSTA-ISABELLA-MUSKEGON-
        MONTCALM-GRATIOT-OTTAWA-KENT-IONIA-CLINTON-ALLEGAN-BARRY-EATON-
        INGHAM-VAN BUREN-KALAMAZOO-CALHOUN- JACKSON-
        INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...LUDINGTON...BALDWIN...REED CITY...
        CLARE...HART...FREMONT...BIG RAPIDS...MOUNT PLEASANT...MUSKEGON...
        GREENVILLE...ALMA...JENISON...GRAND RAPIDS...IONIA...ST. JOHNS...
        HOLLAND...HASTINGS...CHARLOTTE...LANSING...SOUTH HAVEN...
        KALAMAZOO...BATTLE CREEK...JACKSON
        1115 AM EST WED DEC 17 2008

        Winter Storm Watch... REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON
        THROUGH FRIDAY AFTERNOON...

        A WINTER STORM WATCH FOR THE POTENTIAL OF SIGNIFICANT SNOW AND ICE
        ACCUMULATIONS REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
        FRIDAY AFTERNOON.

        THE POTENTIAL EXISTS FOR 8 OR MORE INCHES OR SNOW ACROSS THE WATCH
        AREA THURSDAY NIGHT AND FRIDAY. IT NOW APPEARS THAT THE HIGHEST
        LIKELIHOOD OF FREEZING RAIN WITH ICE ACCUMULATION IN EXCESS OF ONE
        QUARTER INCH WILL BE ALONG AND SOUTH OF INTERSTATE 94. MOSTLY SNOW
        IS NOW EXPECTED NORTH OF INTERSTATE 94.

        A WINTER STORM WATCH IS ISSUED WHEN SEVERE WINTER WEATHER IS
        POSSIBLE BUT NOT IMMINENT. AT THE TIME THERE IS A POTENTIAL FOR
        SIGNIFICANT SNOW AND OR ICE ACCUMULATIONS. FUTURE DRIVING AND
        WALKING CONDITIONS MAY BECOME HAZARDOUS...SO IT IS IMPORTANT TO
        MONITOR THE LATEST FORECASTS.

         


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      • wd8usa@aol.com
        Yep! With the projected heavy snow fall I ain t going any where! JB ... From: Jeffs lists To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, 17
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 17, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Yep! With the projected heavy snow fall I ain't going any where! JB


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Jeffs lists <lists@...>
          To: WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wed, 17 Dec 2008 10:37 pm
          Subject: RE: [WestMichiganHams] Winter Storm Watch

          How about Friday on the 5.27 Joe?  Will you be around to run it?   
           
           
           
          From: WestMichiganHams@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:WestMichiga nHams@yahoogroup s.com] On Behalf Of wd8usa@...
          Sent: Wednesday, December 17, 2008 10:22 PM
          To: WestMichiganHams@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: Re: [WestMichiganHams] Winter Storm Watch
           
          Perhaps a snowfall net event? JB


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Jeffs lists <lists@n8jsn. org>
          To: WestMichiganHams@ yahoogroups. com
          Sent: Wed, 17 Dec 2008 11:28 am
          Subject: [WestMichiganHams] Winter Storm Watch
          I’m sure you’ve all seen the info on tv.  Sounds like this one could be exciting.  
           
           
          WWUS43 KGRR 171615
          WSWGRR

          URGENT - WINTER WEATHER MESSAGE
          NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAND RAPIDS MI
          1115 AM EST WED DEC 17 2008

          Winter Storm Watch... IN EFFECT...

          .A STRENGTHENING LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM WILL TRACK FROM THE CENTRAL
          PLAINS TO NORTHERN OHIO THURSDAY NIGHT AND FRIDAY. SIGNIFICANT
          ACCUMULATIONS OF SNOW AND ICE ARE POSSIBLE ALONG AND NORTH OF THE
          LOW TRACK.

          MIZ037>040-043>046-050>052-056>059-064>067-071>074-180015-
          /O.CON.KGRR. WS.A.0014. 081218T2200Z- 081219T2100Z/
          MASON-LAKE-OSCEOLA- CLARE-OCEANA- NEWAYGO-MECOSTA- ISABELLA- MUSKEGON-
          MONTCALM-GRATIOT- OTTAWA-KENT- IONIA-CLINTON- ALLEGAN-BARRY- EATON-
          INGHAM-VAN BUREN-KALAMAZOO- CALHOUN- JACKSON-
          INCLUDING THE CITIES OF...LUDINGTON. ..BALDWIN. ..REED CITY...
          CLARE...HART. ..FREMONT. ..BIG RAPIDS...MOUNT PLEASANT...MUSKEGON ...
          GREENVILLE.. .ALMA...JENISON. ..GRAND RAPIDS...IONIA. ..ST. JOHNS...
          HOLLAND...HASTINGS. ..CHARLOTTE. ..LANSING. ..SOUTH HAVEN...
          KALAMAZOO... BATTLE CREEK...JACKSON
          1115 AM EST WED DEC 17 2008

          Winter Storm Watch... REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON
          THROUGH FRIDAY AFTERNOON...

          A WINTER STORM WATCH FOR THE POTENTIAL OF SIGNIFICANT SNOW AND ICE
          ACCUMULATIONS REMAINS IN EFFECT FROM THURSDAY AFTERNOON THROUGH
          FRIDAY AFTERNOON.

          THE POTENTIAL EXISTS FOR 8 OR MORE INCHES OR SNOW ACROSS THE WATCH
          AREA THURSDAY NIGHT AND FRIDAY. IT NOW APPEARS THAT THE HIGHEST
          LIKELIHOOD OF FREEZING RAIN WITH ICE ACCUMULATION IN EXCESS OF ONE
          QUARTER INCH WILL BE ALONG AND SOUTH OF INTERSTATE 94. MOSTLY SNOW
          IS NOW EXPECTED NORTH OF INTERSTATE 94.

          A WINTER STORM WATCH IS ISSUED WHEN SEVERE WINTER WEATHER IS
          POSSIBLE BUT NOT IMMINENT. AT THE TIME THERE IS A POTENTIAL FOR
          SIGNIFICANT SNOW AND OR ICE ACCUMULATIONS. FUTURE DRIVING AND
          WALKING CONDITIONS MAY BECOME HAZARDOUS... SO IT IS IMPORTANT TO
          MONITOR THE LATEST FORECASTS.
           

          Listen to 350+ music, sports, news radio stations – including songs for the holidays – FREE while you browse. Start Listening Now!
        • Jeffs lists
          So everyone.. Pass the word. Snowfall Net on 145.27/r Friday night 6:00 PM. Lets give the NWS a bunch of solid reports of what this storm does to the area.
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 17, 2008
          • 0 Attachment

             

            So everyone.. Pass the word.  Snowfall Net on 145.27/r Friday night 6:00 PM.  Lets give the NWS a bunch of solid reports of what this storm does to the area.

             

             

            If for some reason you cannot make it.  Call the 800#.  (which I can’t seem to find right now)

             

            How to measure snow from http://www.crh.noaa.gov/grr/coop/howto/measuresnow/

             

            How to Measure Snow

            The following procedures were developed from previous National Weather Service procedures and input from a broad array of expertise from climatologists, snow specialists, weather observers, and data users. Some of the materials have been extracted from "The Snow Booklet" by Nolan J. Doesken and Arthur Judson, CSU, 1996).

            It is essential for all observers to understand the importance of taking standard measurements in the prescribed consistent manner. Inconsistent observing and reporting methods result in incompatible data which can result in profoundly incorrect differences between stations and observers.

            Each season before the first snows come: Review these instructions for measuring snow. It is easy to forget what needs to be measured, especially in those parts of the country where snow falls infrequently.

            ·         At the beginning of each snowfall/freezing season, remove the funnel and inner measuring tube of the eight-inch manual rain gauge to expose the 8-inch diameter overflow can so that it can more accurately catch frozen precipitation.

            ·         Put your snowboard(s) out and mark their location with a flag or some other indicator so they can be found after a new snowfall. They should be located in the vicinity of your station in an open location (not under trees, obstructions, or on the north side of structures in the shadows).

            ·         Check your gauge to make sure there are no leaks. If there are leaks, take appropriate action.

            ·         Once your equipment has been readied for winter you are prepared for taking snowfall measurements.

            Observers should determine three values when reporting solid precipitation. They are:

            1.     Measure and record the snowfall ( snow, ice pellets) since the previous snowfall observation

            2.     Determine the depth of snow on the ground at the normal observation time

            3.     Measure and record the water equivalent of snowfall since the previous day's observation

            Measure and record the greatest amount of snowfall that has accumulated on your snowboard (wooden deck or ground if board is not available) since the previous snowfall observation. This measurement should be taken minimally once-a-day (but can be taken up to four times a day, see note below) and should reflect the greatest accumulation of new snow observed (in inches and tenths, for example, 3.9 inches) since the last snowfall observation. If you are not available to watch snow accumulation at all times of the day and night, use your best estimate, based on a measurement of snowfall at the scheduled time of observation along with knowledge of what took place during the past 24 hours. If you are not present to witness the greatest snow accumulation, input may be obtained from other people who were near the station during the snow event. If your observation is not based on a measurement, record in your remarks that the "snow amount based on estimate".

            Remember, you want to report the greatest accumulation since the last observation. If snowfall occurred several times during the period, and each snowfall melted either completely or in part before the next snowfall, record the total of the greatest snowdepths of each event and enter in your remarks "snowfall melted during the OBS period". For example, three separate snow squalls affect your station during your 24 hour reporting day, say 3.0, 2.2, and 1.5 inches. The snow from each event melts off before the next accumulation and no snow is on the ground at your scheduled time of observation. The total snowfall for that reporting 24-hour day is the sum of the three separate snow squalls, 6.7 inches, even though the snow depth on your board at observation time was zero. Snow often melts as it lands. If snow continually melts as it lands, and the accumulation never reaches 0.1 inches on your measuring surface, snowfall should be recorded as a trace (T) and record in your remarks that the "snow melted as it landed".

            It is essential to measure snowfall (and snow depth) in locations where the effects of blowing and drifting are minimized. Finding a good location where snow accumulates uniformly simplifies all other aspects of the observation and reduces the numerous opportunities for error. In open areas where windblown snow cannot be avoided, several measurements may often be necessary to obtain an average depth and they should not include the largest drifts. In heavily forested locations, try and find an exposed clearing in the trees. Measurements beneath trees are inaccurate since large amounts of snow can accumulate on trees and never reach the ground.

            If your daily schedule permits, you may wish to make a snowfall observation every 6-hours, beginning with your regularly scheduled time of observation. This is the procedure followed by NOAA's National Weather Service Forecast Offices. Follow the same rules for a once-a-day observation, but the snow accumulation reported will be the greatest for the previous six hours instead of 24 hours. If you take your observations at this frequency, make sure that you clear your snowboard (or other measuring surface) no more than once every 6 hours. Record the frequency of observations during the day in the comments section of your report. Never sum more than four, six-hourly observations to determine your 24 hour snowfall total. If you use more than four observations, it would falsely increase snowfall totals.

            Freezing rain (glaze ice) should never be reported as snowfall. This precipitation type is liquid precipitation and should be reported as such.

            1.     Determine the total depth of snow, ice pellets, or ice on the ground. This observation is taken once-a-day at the scheduled time of observation with a measuring stick. It is taken by measuring the total depth of snow on exposed ground at a permanently-mounted snow stake or by taking the average of several depth readings at or near the normal point of observation with a measuring stick. When using a measuring stick, make sure the stick is pushed vertically into the snow until the bottom of the stick rests on the ground. Do not mistake an ice layer or crusted snow as "ground". The measurement should reflect the average depth of snow, ice pellets, and glaze ice on the ground at your usual measurement site (not disturbed by human activities). Measurements from rooftops, paved areas, and the like should not be made. Note: Even though the depth of hail (usually associated with spring, summer, or fall thunderstorms) at observation time is also reported in the same manner as snow depth, make sure you record in your remarks that the "accumulation on ground is from hail". 

            Report snow depth to the nearest whole inch, rounding up when one-half inch increments are reached (example 0.4 inches gets reported as a trace (T), 3.5 inches gets reported as 4 inches). Frequently, in hilly or mountainous terrain, you will be faced with the situation where no snow is observed on south-facing slopes while snow, possibly deep, remains in shaded or north-facing areas. Under these circumstances, you should use good judgement to visually average and then measure snow depths in exposed areas within several hundred yards surrounding the weather

            station. For example, if half the exposed ground is bare and half is covered with six inches of snow, the snow depth should be entered as the average of the two readings, or three inches. When in your judgement, less than 50% of the exposed ground is covered by snow, even though the covered areas have a significant depth, the snow depth should be recorded as a trace (T). When no snow or ice is on the ground in exposed areas (snow may be present in surrounding forested or otherwise protected areas), record a "0".

            When strong winds have blown the snow, take several measurements where the snow was least affected by drifting and average them. If most exposed areas are either blown free of snow while others have drifts, again try to combine visual averaging with measurements to make your estimate.

            2.     Measuring the water equivalent of snowfall since the previous day's observation. This measurement is taken once-a-day at your specified time of observation. Melt the contents of your gauge (by bringing it inside your home or adding a measured amount of warm water) and then pour the liquid into the funnel and smaller inner measuring tube and measure the amount to the nearest .01 inch (use NWS provided measuring stick) just as you use for measuring rainfall. Do not measure the melted precipitation directly in the large 8-inch outer cylinder. Make sure the inner measuring tube can't fall over when pouring the liquid back into it. If the melted water equivalent (including any added warm water) exceeds two inches and cannot fit into the measuring tube all at one time, then empty the full measuring tube and pour the remaining liquid from the large 8-inch outer cylinder into the emptied measuring tube. Then, add and record the water equivalent of the multiple measurements.

            If you added warm water to the gauge to melt the snow, make sure you accurately measure the amount of warm water added before pouring it into the gauge. Then, when you take your liquid measurement, subtract the amount of warm water added from the total liquid measurement to get your final liquid water equivalent of the snowfall.

            As winds increase, gauges collect less and less of the precipitation that actually falls. Generally speaking, the stronger the wind and the drier the snow, the less is captured in the gauge. If you notice that less snow is in the gauge than accumulated on the ground, you should first empty any existing snow from inside the 8-inch cylinder, then use it to take a snow sample, sometimes referred to as "take a core" or "cut a biscuit" from your snow board with the 8-inch overflow can. Melt the biscuit of snow, pour the liquid into the small measuring tube to measure the water equivalent.

             

          • Tom VanderMel KB8VEE
            All Hams Pass on please For anybody that did not get this lets get the snow reports into the NWS Friday night. Thanks Tom KB8VEE So everyone.. Pass the word.
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 18, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              
              All Hams Pass on please
               
              For anybody that did not get this lets get the snow reports into the NWS Friday night. Thanks Tom KB8VEE

              So everyone.. Pass the word.  Snowfall Net on 145.27/r Friday night 6:00 PM.  Lets give the NWS a bunch of solid reports of what this storm does to the area.

              If for some reason you cannot make it.  Call the 800#.  (which I can’t seem to find right now)

              How to measure snow from http://www.crh. noaa.gov/ grr/coop/ howto/measuresno w/

              How to Measure Snow

              The following procedures were developed from previous National Weather Service procedures and input from a broad array of expertise from climatologists, snow specialists, weather observers, and data users. Some of the materials have been extracted from "The Snow Booklet" by Nolan J. Doesken and Arthur Judson, CSU, 1996).

              It is essential for all observers to understand the importance of taking standard measurements in the prescribed consistent manner. Inconsistent observing and reporting methods result in incompatible data which can result in profoundly incorrect differences between stations and observers.

              Each season before the first snows come: Review these instructions for measuring snow. It is easy to forget what needs to be measured, especially in those parts of the country where snow falls infrequently.

              ·         At the beginning of each snowfall/freezing season, remove the funnel and inner measuring tube of the eight-inch manual rain gauge to expose the 8-inch diameter overflow can so that it can more accurately catch frozen precipitation.

              ·         Put your snowboard(s) out and mark their location with a flag or some other indicator so they can be found after a new snowfall. They should be located in the vicinity of your station in an open location (not under trees, obstructions, or on the north side of structures in the shadows).

              ·         Check your gauge to make sure there are no leaks. If there are leaks, take appropriate action.

              ·         Once your equipment has been readied for winter you are prepared for taking snowfall measurements.

              Observers should determine three values when reporting solid precipitation. They are:

              1.     Measure and record the snowfall ( snow, ice pellets) since the previous snowfall observation

              2.     Determine the depth of snow on the ground at the normal observation time

              3.     Measure and record the water equivalent of snowfall since the previous day's observation

              Measure and record the greatest amount of snowfall that has accumulated on your snowboard (wooden deck or ground if board is not available) since the previous snowfall observation. This measurement should be taken minimally once-a-day (but can be taken up to four times a day, see note below) and should reflect the greatest accumulation of new snow observed (in inches and tenths, for example, 3.9 inches) since the last snowfall observation. If you are not available to watch snow accumulation at all times of the day and night, use your best estimate, based on a measurement of snowfall at the scheduled time of observation along with knowledge of what took place during the past 24 hours. If you are not present to witness the greatest snow accumulation, input may be obtained from other people who were near the station during the snow event. If your observation is not based on a measurement, record in your remarks that the "snow amount based on estimate".

              Remember, you want to report the greatest accumulation since the last observation. If snowfall occurred several times during the period, and each snowfall melted either completely or in part before the next snowfall, record the total of the greatest snowdepths of each event and enter in your remarks "snowfall melted during the OBS period". For example, three separate snow squalls affect your station during your 24 hour reporting day, say 3.0, 2.2, and 1.5 inches. The snow from each event melts off before the next accumulation and no snow is on the ground at your scheduled time of observation. The total snowfall for that reporting 24-hour day is the sum of the three separate snow squalls, 6.7 inches, even though the snow depth on your board at observation time was zero. Snow often melts as it lands. If snow continually melts as it lands, and the accumulation never reaches 0.1 inches on your measuring surface, snowfall should be recorded as a trace (T) and record in your remarks that the "snow melted as it landed".

              It is essential to measure snowfall (and snow depth) in locations where the effects of blowing and drifting are minimized. Finding a good location where snow accumulates uniformly simplifies all other aspects of the observation and reduces the numerous opportunities for error. In open areas where windblown snow cannot be avoided, several measurements may often be necessary to obtain an average depth and they should not include the largest drifts. In heavily forested locations, try and find an exposed clearing in the trees. Measurements beneath trees are inaccurate since large amounts of snow can accumulate on trees and never reach the ground.

              If your daily schedule permits, you may wish to make a snowfall observation every 6-hours, beginning with your regularly scheduled time of observation. This is the procedure followed by NOAA's National Weather Service Forecast Offices. Follow the same rules for a once-a-day observation, but the snow accumulation reported will be the greatest for the previous six hours instead of 24 hours. If you take your observations at this frequency, make sure that you clear your snowboard (or other measuring surface) no more than once every 6 hours. Record the frequency of observations during the day in the comments section of your report. Never sum more than four, six-hourly observations to determine your 24 hour snowfall total. If you use more than four observations, it would falsely increase snowfall totals.

              Freezing rain (glaze ice) should never be reported as snowfall. This precipitation type is liquid precipitation and should be reported as such.

              1.     Determine the total depth of snow, ice pellets, or ice on the ground. This observation is taken once-a-day at the scheduled time of observation with a measuring stick. It is taken by measuring the total depth of snow on exposed ground at a permanently- mounted snow stake or by taking the average of several depth readings at or near the normal point of observation with a measuring stick. When using a measuring stick, make sure the stick is pushed vertically into the snow until the bottom of the stick rests on the ground. Do not mistake an ice layer or crusted snow as "ground". The measurement should reflect the average depth of snow, ice pellets, and glaze ice on the ground at your usual measurement site (not disturbed by human activities). Measurements from rooftops, paved areas, and the like should not be made. Note: Even though the depth of hail (usually associated with spring, summer, or fall thunderstorms) at observation time is also reported in the same manner as snow depth, make sure you record in your remarks that the "accumulation on ground is from hail". 

              Report snow depth to the nearest whole inch, rounding up when one-half inch increments are reached (example 0.4 inches gets reported as a trace (T), 3.5 inches gets reported as 4 inches). Frequently, in hilly or mountainous terrain, you will be faced with the situation where no snow is observed on south-facing slopes while snow, possibly deep, remains in shaded or north-facing areas. Under these circumstances, you should use good judgement to visually average and then measure snow depths in exposed areas within several hundred yards surrounding the weather

              station. For example, if half the exposed ground is bare and half is covered with six inches of snow, the snow depth should be entered as the average of the two readings, or three inches. When in your judgement, less than 50% of the exposed ground is covered by snow, even though the covered areas have a significant depth, the snow depth should be recorded as a trace (T). When no snow or ice is on the ground in exposed areas (snow may be present in surrounding forested or otherwise protected areas), record a "0".

              When strong winds have blown the snow, take several measurements where the snow was least affected by drifting and average them. If most exposed areas are either blown free of snow while others have drifts, again try to combine visual averaging with measurements to make your estimate.

              2.     Measuring the water equivalent of snowfall since the previous day's observation. This measurement is taken once-a-day at your specified time of observation. Melt the contents of your gauge (by bringing it inside your home or adding a measured amount of warm water) and then pour the liquid into the funnel and smaller inner measuring tube and measure the amount to the nearest .01 inch (use NWS provided measuring stick) just as you use for measuring rainfall. Do not measure the melted precipitation directly in the large 8-inch outer cylinder. Make sure the inner measuring tube can't fall over when pouring the liquid back into it. If the melted water equivalent (including any added warm water) exceeds two inches and cannot fit into the measuring tube all at one time, then empty the full measuring tube and pour the remaining liquid from the large 8-inch outer cylinder into the emptied measuring tube. Then, add and record the water equivalent of the multiple measurements.

              If you added warm water to the gauge to melt the snow, make sure you accurately measure the amount of warm water added before pouring it into the gauge. Then, when you take your liquid measurement, subtract the amount of warm water added from the total liquid measurement to get your final liquid water equivalent of the snowfall.

              As winds increase, gauges collect less and less of the precipitation that actually falls. Generally speaking, the stronger the wind and the drier the snow, the less is captured in the gauge. If you notice that less snow is in the gauge than accumulated on the ground, you should first empty any existing snow from inside the 8-inch cylinder, then use it to take a snow sample, sometimes referred to as "take a core" or "cut a biscuit" from your snow board with the 8-inch overflow can. Melt the biscuit of snow, pour the liquid into the small measuring tube to measure the water equivalent.

            • ravennaelectronics
              You may also pass the information along on the Michigan VHF Traffic Net and the QMN Net. Both have a NWS Liaison that will pick up the traffic and report it
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 18, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                You may also pass the information along on the Michigan VHF Traffic
                Net and the QMN Net. Both have a NWS Liaison that will pick up the
                traffic and report it to the NWS.

                --- In WestMichiganHams@yahoogroups.com, "Tom VanderMel KB8VEE"
                <kb8vee@...> wrote:
                >
                > All Hams Pass on please
                >
                > For anybody that did not get this lets get the snow reports into
                the NWS Friday night. Thanks Tom KB8VEE
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > So everyone.. Pass the word. Snowfall Net on 145.27/r Friday night
                6:00 PM. Lets give the NWS a bunch of solid reports of what this
                storm does to the area.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > If for some reason you cannot make it. Call the 800#. (which I
                can’t seem to find right now)
                >
                >
                >
                > How to measure snow from
                http://www.crh.noaa.gov/grr/coop/howto/measuresnow/
                >
                >
                >
                > How to Measure Snow
                >
                > The following procedures were developed from previous National
                Weather Service procedures and input from a broad array of expertise
                from climatologists, snow specialists, weather observers, and data
                users. Some of the materials have been extracted from "The Snow
                Booklet" by Nolan J. Doesken and Arthur Judson, CSU, 1996).
                >
                > It is essential for all observers to understand the importance of
                taking standard measurements in the prescribed consistent manner.
                Inconsistent observing and reporting methods result in incompatible
                data which can result in profoundly incorrect differences between
                stations and observers.
                >
                > Each season before the first snows come: Review these instructions
                for measuring snow. It is easy to forget what needs to be measured,
                especially in those parts of the country where snow falls
                infrequently.
                >
                > · At the beginning of each snowfall/freezing season,
                remove the funnel and inner measuring tube of the eight-inch manual
                rain gauge to expose the 8-inch diameter overflow can so that it can
                more accurately catch frozen precipitation.
                >
                > · Put your snowboard(s) out and mark their location with a
                flag or some other indicator so they can be found after a new
                snowfall. They should be located in the vicinity of your station in
                an open location (not under trees, obstructions, or on the north side
                of structures in the shadows).
                >
                > · Check your gauge to make sure there are no leaks. If
                there are leaks, take appropriate action.
                >
                > · Once your equipment has been readied for winter you are
                prepared for taking snowfall measurements.
                >
                > Observers should determine three values when reporting solid
                precipitation. They are:
                >
                > 1. Measure and record the snowfall ( snow, ice pellets) since
                the previous snowfall observation
                >
                > 2. Determine the depth of snow on the ground at the normal
                observation time
                >
                > 3. Measure and record the water equivalent of snowfall since
                the previous day's observation
                >
                > Measure and record the greatest amount of snowfall that has
                accumulated on your snowboard (wooden deck or ground if board is not
                available) since the previous snowfall observation. This measurement
                should be taken minimally once-a-day (but can be taken up to four
                times a day, see note below) and should reflect the greatest
                accumulation of new snow observed (in inches and tenths, for example,
                3.9 inches) since the last snowfall observation. If you are not
                available to watch snow accumulation at all times of the day and
                night, use your best estimate, based on a measurement of snowfall at
                the scheduled time of observation along with knowledge of what took
                place during the past 24 hours. If you are not present to witness the
                greatest snow accumulation, input may be obtained from other people
                who were near the station during the snow event. If your observation
                is not based on a measurement, record in your remarks that the "snow
                amount based on estimate".
                >
                > Remember, you want to report the greatest accumulation since the
                last observation. If snowfall occurred several times during the
                period, and each snowfall melted either completely or in part before
                the next snowfall, record the total of the greatest snowdepths of
                each event and enter in your remarks "snowfall melted during the OBS
                period". For example, three separate snow squalls affect your station
                during your 24 hour reporting day, say 3.0, 2.2, and 1.5 inches. The
                snow from each event melts off before the next accumulation and no
                snow is on the ground at your scheduled time of observation. The
                total snowfall for that reporting 24-hour day is the sum of the three
                separate snow squalls, 6.7 inches, even though the snow depth on your
                board at observation time was zero. Snow often melts as it lands. If
                snow continually melts as it lands, and the accumulation never
                reaches 0.1 inches on your measuring surface, snowfall should be
                recorded as a trace (T) and record in your remarks that the "snow
                melted as it landed".
                >
                > It is essential to measure snowfall (and snow depth) in locations
                where the effects of blowing and drifting are minimized. Finding a
                good location where snow accumulates uniformly simplifies all other
                aspects of the observation and reduces the numerous opportunities for
                error. In open areas where windblown snow cannot be avoided, several
                measurements may often be necessary to obtain an average depth and
                they should not include the largest drifts. In heavily forested
                locations, try and find an exposed clearing in the trees.
                Measurements beneath trees are inaccurate since large amounts of snow
                can accumulate on trees and never reach the ground.
                >
                > If your daily schedule permits, you may wish to make a snowfall
                observation every 6-hours, beginning with your regularly scheduled
                time of observation. This is the procedure followed by NOAA's
                National Weather Service Forecast Offices. Follow the same rules for
                a once-a-day observation, but the snow accumulation reported will be
                the greatest for the previous six hours instead of 24 hours. If you
                take your observations at this frequency, make sure that you clear
                your snowboard (or other measuring surface) no more than once every 6
                hours. Record the frequency of observations during the day in the
                comments section of your report. Never sum more than four, six-hourly
                observations to determine your 24 hour snowfall total. If you use
                more than four observations, it would falsely increase snowfall
                totals.
                >
                > Freezing rain (glaze ice) should never be reported as snowfall.
                This precipitation type is liquid precipitation and should be
                reported as such.
                >
                > 1. Determine the total depth of snow, ice pellets, or ice on
                the ground. This observation is taken once-a-day at the scheduled
                time of observation with a measuring stick. It is taken by measuring
                the total depth of snow on exposed ground at a permanently-mounted
                snow stake or by taking the average of several depth readings at or
                near the normal point of observation with a measuring stick. When
                using a measuring stick, make sure the stick is pushed vertically
                into the snow until the bottom of the stick rests on the ground. Do
                not mistake an ice layer or crusted snow as "ground". The measurement
                should reflect the average depth of snow, ice pellets, and glaze ice
                on the ground at your usual measurement site (not disturbed by human
                activities). Measurements from rooftops, paved areas, and the like
                should not be made. Note: Even though the depth of hail (usually
                associated with spring, summer, or fall thunderstorms) at observation
                time is also reported in the same manner as snow depth, make sure you
                record in your remarks that the "accumulation on ground is from
                hail".
                >
                > Report snow depth to the nearest whole inch, rounding up when one-
                half inch increments are reached (example 0.4 inches gets reported as
                a trace (T), 3.5 inches gets reported as 4 inches). Frequently, in
                hilly or mountainous terrain, you will be faced with the situation
                where no snow is observed on south-facing slopes while snow, possibly
                deep, remains in shaded or north-facing areas. Under these
                circumstances, you should use good judgement to visually average and
                then measure snow depths in exposed areas within several hundred
                yards surrounding the weather
                >
                > station. For example, if half the exposed ground is bare and half
                is covered with six inches of snow, the snow depth should be entered
                as the average of the two readings, or three inches. When in your
                judgement, less than 50% of the exposed ground is covered by snow,
                even though the covered areas have a significant depth, the snow
                depth should be recorded as a trace (T). When no snow or ice is on
                the ground in exposed areas (snow may be present in surrounding
                forested or otherwise protected areas), record a "0".
                >
                > When strong winds have blown the snow, take several measurements
                where the snow was least affected by drifting and average them. If
                most exposed areas are either blown free of snow while others have
                drifts, again try to combine visual averaging with measurements to
                make your estimate.
                >
                > 2. Measuring the water equivalent of snowfall since the
                previous day's observation. This measurement is taken once-a-day at
                your specified time of observation. Melt the contents of your gauge
                (by bringing it inside your home or adding a measured amount of warm
                water) and then pour the liquid into the funnel and smaller inner
                measuring tube and measure the amount to the nearest .01 inch (use
                NWS provided measuring stick) just as you use for measuring rainfall.
                Do not measure the melted precipitation directly in the large 8-inch
                outer cylinder. Make sure the inner measuring tube can't fall over
                when pouring the liquid back into it. If the melted water equivalent
                (including any added warm water) exceeds two inches and cannot fit
                into the measuring tube all at one time, then empty the full
                measuring tube and pour the remaining liquid from the large 8-inch
                outer cylinder into the emptied measuring tube. Then, add and record
                the water equivalent of the multiple measurements.
                >
                > If you added warm water to the gauge to melt the snow, make sure
                you accurately measure the amount of warm water added before pouring
                it into the gauge. Then, when you take your liquid measurement,
                subtract the amount of warm water added from the total liquid
                measurement to get your final liquid water equivalent of the snowfall.
                >
                > As winds increase, gauges collect less and less of the
                precipitation that actually falls. Generally speaking, the stronger
                the wind and the drier the snow, the less is captured in the gauge.
                If you notice that less snow is in the gauge than accumulated on the
                ground, you should first empty any existing snow from inside the 8-
                inch cylinder, then use it to take a snow sample, sometimes referred
                to as "take a core" or "cut a biscuit" from your snow board with the
                8-inch overflow can. Melt the biscuit of snow, pour the liquid into
                the small measuring tube to measure the water equivalent.
                >
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