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On Judging

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  • Else Hunrvogt
    Each horsemanship judge will have 10 points to assign to each competitor in each prelim portion. All the scores from all the judges will make up 50% of your
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 6, 2009
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      Each horsemanship judge will have 10 points to assign to each competitor in each prelim portion. All the scores from all the judges will make up 50% of your score.

      Please note that 10 whole points across an entire pattern does not leave a great deal of room for subtlety in judging.

      Some portions of the patterns are deliberately vague. They don't tell you what rate of trot/jog to go at. They don't specify how big to make the circles. They don't say whether to sit, post or two-point at the trot. They don't specify how many steps to take when backing. This is your chance to show us what to do. The patterns are kept open so that they are applicable to a wide range of riding styles.

      You will not be getting a judging rubric. If it is not specified in what you have so far. It is not specified. Judging is by it's very nature, subjective. Each judge is likely to interprete the subtle differences in subtley different ways and assign available points accordingly. Horse Show organizations have massive rulebooks and well-trained (and sometimes highly payed) judges. We are approaching this challenge by giving lots of qualified individuals with opinions a narrow scope to work in. Please note that while subjective judge plays a large part in who qualifies for finals it is not a portion of determining the ultimate victor.

      For myself (and only speaking for myself), I am looking for a Champion whose horsemanship is a credit to this Kingdom and its riders.

      When *I* judge with numbers, I look at the essence of the excercise. If the pattern calls for Halt. Back. and Trot and circle. If they do most of that, that is a 5. If they are nearly perfect but have a few walk steps between the back and the trot. That is a 9. If they pick up the wrong digonal (or lead or whatever), they will get more points than someone that didn't make a mistake, but fewer points than someone made the mistake and never corrected it. In the same vein *I* would give a higher score to someone who performs a perfect simple change than someone that only gets half of a flying change or fails to change leads at all.

      Now that I have made everyone nervous. Take a look at the patterns. No one says you have to canter or do a rising trot or whatever. There is lots of room in there for each of you to show us the things that you and your horse(s) know how to do.

      Else
    • Nancy Reimers
      And this is why I confined those comments to my own judging. That statement should have read with the corrections listed in red. Is it Monday yet? Else
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 6, 2009
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        And this is why I confined those comments to my own judging.  That statement should have read with the corrections listed in red.  Is it Monday yet?
         
        Else

        On Thu, Aug 6, 2009 at 1:28 PM, Else Hunrvogt <nancyreimers@...> wrote:
         

        When *I* judge with numbers, If they pick up the wrong digonal (or lead or whatever) and correct it, they will get more points deducted than someone that didn't make a mistake, but fewer points deducted than someone made the mistake and never corrected it. 

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