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broom ball is a simple and safe

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  • mark murphy
    I never said it was dangerous nor that I did not know what it was. What I said was Gwen said no polo and this is still polo . Gwen said Write it up as an
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 29, 2007
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      I never said it was dangerous nor that I did not know what it was.

      What I said was ""Gwen said "no polo" and this is still polo"".

      Gwen said "Write it up as an experimental game and present it ".

      SnS


      Broom Ball is to Polo what swimming in a 6" deep blow up baby pool is
      to Olympic swimming!




      How dangerous is broom ball? A person with a ring lance is more than
      100 times more likely to hurt themselves or someone around them!





      Rules for broom ball, as it appears people are not acquainted with this
      simple and fun kids game:




      Honestly, the tag game Siobhan was playing is far more dangerous than
      broom ball,
    • Rachael Keish
      Well, that s why we have a discussion list so people can present differing opinions for discussion. I have never played and don t know how similar or
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 30, 2007
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        Well, that's why we have a discussion list so people can present differing opinions for discussion.  I have never played and don't know how similar or dissimilar broomball is to polo. It seems several people don't think broomball is dangerous based on their experience. 
         
        The call that KEO Gwen made under the old handbook (just days ago, and its already old!) was to write it up as an experimental activity based on its resemblance to polo.  But does that ruling apply under the new handbook, which does not mention/forbid specific activities (and we don't want it to)?  If Gwen was enforcing a rule based on a handbook that we are now (finally!) rid of, she may have a differing ruling for the West now that we are free to assess the game based on its merits, not its resemblance to polo.  I thought that was why we were continuing the discussion, since it seems nobody is charging ahead with writing up formal experimental activity proposed rules.
         
        So as a marshal, if something isn't forbidden by the handbook and seems safe to us, under the new handbook there would be no reason not to allow folks to play.  Be it a ribbon game or a ball toss or whatever other non-martial game with equipment, or Polo or things that resemle polo enough for government work (& several other activities that *used* top be specifically called out by the SCA EQ Handbook)  - now that Game X is not forbidden, what makes it consiudered safer or more dangerous than Game Y?  Do all new activities that people want to do other than a pre-set list of stuff we've already done require a formal proposal? (Well, of course not).
         
        I'm looking forward to Saturday's meeting to discuss how we handle activities that are considered 'new' - to us as individuals or to the SCA - in terms of what is considerd safe & fine vs. what is considered not safe and must therefore be formally proposed as an experimental activity. 
        :-), Marguerite
         
        On 10/29/07, mark murphy <dkarp@...> wrote:
        I never said it was dangerous nor that I did not know what it was.

        What I said was ""Gwen said "no polo" and this is still polo"".

        Gwen said "Write it up as an experimental game and present it ".

        SnS


        Broom Ball is to Polo what swimming in a 6" deep blow up baby pool is
        to Olympic swimming!




        How dangerous is broom ball? A person with a ring lance is more than
        100 times more likely to hurt themselves or someone around them!





        Rules for broom ball, as it appears people are not acquainted with this
        simple and fun kids game:




        Honestly, the tag game Siobhan was playing is far more dangerous than
        broom ball,

      • Mistress Collette de Rayncheval / Autumn
        One thing that I find ridiculous is the not invented here syndrome. If we can find that other equestrian groups use an activity and have little to no safety
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 31, 2007
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          One thing that I find ridiculous is the "not invented here" syndrome.

          If we can find that other equestrian groups use an activity and have little to no safety issues with it, why must we ban the activity until we have spent years putting our own marks on the activity before we acknowledge that the activity actually is safe; especially when the activity is a game considered safe enough for young kids everywhere else in the Eq world?

          I have no issue with games that are not tried and true in the real world ending up getting tested out before being accepted. But only after the activity has been looked at with an unbiased eye and without a knee jerk reaction. (Like the tag game Siobhan played a while back, which is fairly safe, or the Mounted Boffer Combat, where we definitely need to be sure that everyone is playing the same game by the same rules.)

          Personally, I do think that Polo is dangerous. Horses run into each other frequently and riders come off and are trampled. Swinging mallets hit and injure horses legs and riders. The round rock that is used for polo is hit hard and has a hard impact on those unfortunate enough to be in its path. Due to these considerations, if we were to include polo (which was played in several styles in period) we should definitely evaluate it and determine how we could make it safe enough to meet SCA standards.

          Broom Ball (also known as Broom Polo, or derogatively as Cowboy Polo because it does not require an English saddle and is made as safe as can be) is usually played casually by people who don't focus their lives around the game. It is played with a soft, light, straw broom of less than 1/2 the weight of a polo mallet, that also cannot be swung hard because of wind resistance. Rather than the small, round rock that in polo is called a ball, the ball for Broom Ball is large and soft so that it cannot fly with any force. However, because the light soft Broom Ball ball is hit by a broom that cannot be swung hard, the ball cannot be hit with much force, so the ball doesn't have very much force in it for traveling, so it doesn't hit anything hard no matter what. Also, the broom is soft, so if it accidentally hits another horse or rider, it cannot do any real damage. Because the game is so safe, it is often used as a kids game. It has been played around the U.S. for decades.

          When the real world has spend decades proving a game safe, why must we start from scratch. This limits the opportunities to participate in fun activities, even perioid games. (Polo was played with sticks and a small ball, and with spears and a soft ball/sheep/bladder. Broom Ball is not that different from the latter game, except that we can only hit the soft ball, never stab it with a broom.) Also, if we decide to limit one activity we haven't proven to be save within the SCA by going through the full "experimental games" procedure, then we should limit all of them, or we need a procedure to determine which activities don't need to go through the full SCA "experimental games" procedure. I would like to strongly suggest that we consider the real world's experiences with these activities, and their comparative safety records there, as the procedure we use.

          -- Collette
          who really HATES bureaucracy and politics for their own sakes



          mark murphy wrote:
          I never said it was dangerous nor that I did not know what it was.

          What I said was ""Gwen said "no polo" and this is still polo"".

          Gwen said "Write it up as an experimental game and present it ".

          SnS


          Broom Ball is to Polo what swimming in a 6" deep blow up baby pool is
          to Olympic swimming!




          How dangerous is broom ball? A person with a ring lance is more than
          100 times more likely to hurt themselves or someone around them!





          Rules for broom ball, as it appears people are not acquainted with this
          simple and fun kids game:




          Honestly, the tag game Siobhan was playing is far more dangerous than
          broom ball,
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