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Hastings re-enactment

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  • Bob Orser
    The Hastings info that Duke Henrik forwarded was quite interesting. Re-enacting a battle, while avoiding injury to horses or humans, clearly presents very
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 30, 2006
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      The Hastings info that Duke Henrik forwarded was quite interesting.   Re-enacting a battle, while avoiding injury to horses or humans,  clearly presents very different challenges from actually fighting a battle in the period, where you were trying to hurt each other.    In the SCA we manage this pretty well with infantry, archers, and javelin throwers,  all with human brains understanding the rules of the game.   I doubt we could safely integrate horses into our scenarios unless it was a very carefully staged performance.    I've seen some re-enactments in the UK  (English Civil War,  War of the Roses, Napoleonic)  where opposing cavalry interacted  (clashing sabers, pursuing each other over a bridge, etc.)  but did not mix up with the foot.     In the War of the Roses,  even the leaders fought on foot (with their horses held ready in the rear if needed to flee) since both sides had the archers who had slaughtered the French chivalry earlier.    Of course  in 1066 William had cavalry and archers while Harold's infantry  lacked the range of archery and the mobility of cavalry.   Still, the Saxons might not have lost if one whole wing had not broken formation to chase part of William's forces down the hill in a feigned retreat.   Once scattered, they were easy prey for the more mobile riders.    
        Anyway, making a good show for the spectators within safety constraints is certainly an impressive endeavor.   I'm sure we all wish Henrik good fortune in this battle.  With him on the Norman side, I'm wagering that  they'll win yet again.
          - Robert
       
       
       
      Bob Orser
      EarthLink Revolves Around You.
       

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